Now I can start creating vector shapes over the sketch. I start by selecting the Freehand Tool (Toolbox > Freehand Tool or keyboard shortcut F5). The Freehand Tool works in a few different ways. If you click and hold down the mouse button, the line will follow the path of your mouse curser and you can create curved lines. However, if you click once and let go and move your mouse cursor to another point on your workspace then click a second time, you will create a straight line. The goal is to create “closed” shapes, so start the next line by clicking on the end point of the line you just created. Finally, the last line of the shape should end by clicking on the very first point you started with. You know the shape is closed when you can apply fill or color to the shape.

I would like to number a voucher book, i have place 4 vouchers on a page, the thing is that i want each of these vouchers to start with different number, 100, 200, 300, 400, and then i want to number them 99 times. The problem is that they have to be numbered only 1 per page, so that when i have printed them all i can easily crop them and staple them right up with having to go through it all.
The book have many examples, and those examples come with tutorials. However, the tutorials are design specific, and apply to the example. For instance, a logo is created of a lighthouse. You learn some features of Corel, but its not meant to show all the features of Corel. One drawback of the book is that it relies on keyboard shortcuts and does not tell you where to go in the application on many instances. But, I believe the book is more or less trying to go through the methodology of using Corel, not showing you a step by step for every function. If the book had more concentration on using the mouse and where to find features in the user interface, and for screen captures, I would have rated it a 5-star.

This video gives and example of raffle ticket numbering using number pro with InDesign to create the numbering needed for 200 tickets. From creating the data file needed to laying out the document and finally the finished file ready for printing. Number-pro is an easy to use, stand alone application that can be used with InDesign, Corel Draw, Word, Publisher and any other desktop publishing or graphics software that allows for a mail merge function. From raffle tickets to multi part forms Number-Pro can make the whole process much easier.

Now, right-click the Background object and choose Duplicate. Go to New Lens > Grayscale. You now have two obejcts of the brick wall. Choose New Lens > Grayscale, drag the Opacity slider, in my case, to 80. Go to Merge Mode > Overlay. This creates a more intense feel to the brick wall. This places the Grayscale Lens Object over the duplicated brick wall photo object.


The next step depends on what you are most comfortable using. You could start sketching things out in CorelDRAW, maybe use a graphics tablet, or in my case I like to use an old fashioned pencil and pad of paper. I have a small notepad that I doodle in, but sometimes I might make small sketches on post-it notes. I like to make my sketches small because I feel like those small thumbnail drawings lend themselves well to simple and clean layouts. The larger my sketches are, the more detail I tend to create and for projects like this you don't always need a bunch of detail. My sketches aren't pretty. They are just supposed to get me in the ball park (no pun intended). You just want to get a basic look and feel to work from. Don't get discouraged if your sketches aren't exactly what you had in mind. You will be able to fine-tune the design as you go. I created several little thumbnail sketches. And pick one, sometimes two, to build from.
Now go to File > Export > File format, and choose .CPT. In the export dialog, now choose Maintain Layers. It will convert all layers with curve objects, into individual objects in Corel PHOTO-PAINT, with the names retained. So remember to place all curves into individual layers in CorelDRAW before exporting to CPT. If you’re working for print choose 300 dpi of course, and make sure that you work in the same color space etcetera.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this: how to number using indesign
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