Centerline and outline give you various choices (see image). The first is what kind of art you start with. Ideally, you simply select whatever type of bitmap it is. The other two things you should play with are detail and smoothing. Usually you will want to delete the original image and remove the background but there are times when that’s not what you want.
If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.
CorelDRAW allows you to easily add various types of dimensioning lines and call-outs. By using dimension lines, you can indicate the distance between two points in a drawing or the size of objects. By default, dimension lines and the measurements shown on the lines change when you change an objects size. This is referred to as dynamic dimensioning and can be very useful if you need to resize an object or group of objects and want to avoid having to recreate the dimensioning lines.

The fill tool allows you to set the fill pattern and color of your object. If you set it to “no fill” it will be transparent. If you set it to “uniform fill” it will just be one color. If you use “fountain fill” you can make a gradient of colors. You can also fill with a pattern or a texture or use “postscript fill” which allows for parametrized patterns.


Most of the people will tell you that Adobe's are better. Well, I use Adobe because I love Photoshop (I haven't seen any other software so powerful for photographs) and it's got a wider range of users. But, for certain tasks, I use Corel Draw, and I always say to myself "isn't this a great piece of software". It has nothing to envy to others. But it is a case of personal preference.

You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.


I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Or you can see how everything “stacks up” by going to tools->object manager (see image). This creates a pane on the right hand side that lists all the objects and shows their order (see image). You can change their order by dragging them around. You can also select an object by clicking on it and multiple objects by clicking on them with the shift key.
Word numbers all your pages, but those numbers remain hidden unless you tell Word to display them. By inserting a field code anywhere on the page, you can tell Word to reveal the page number. This option gives you fine control over page numbers. It also lets you put numbers anywhere you need and not just in the headers, footers, and margins. For example, you could put them in a text box if you wanted to.
In its first versions, the CDR file format was a completely proprietary file format primarily used for vector graphic drawings, recognizable by the first two bytes of the file being "WL". Starting with CorelDraw 3, the file format changed to a Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF) envelope, recognizable by the first four bytes of the file being "RIFF", and a "CDR*vrsn" in bytes 9 to 15, with the asterisk "*" being in early versions just a blank.[33] Beginning with CorelDraw 4 it included the version number of the writing program in hexadecimal ("4" meaning version 4, "D" meaning version 14). The actual data chunk of the RIFF remains a Corel proprietary format.
Versions for Mac OS and Mac OS X were at one time available, but due to poor sales these were discontinued. The last port for Linux was version 9 (released in 2000, it did not run natively; instead, it used a modified version of Wine to run) and the last version for OS X was version 11 (released in 2001). Also, up until version 5, CorelDraw was developed for Windows 3.1x, CTOS and OS/2.

You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.
This is a good book for someone that is new to Corel Draw, and needs to use Corel Draw for publications. The book is a mix of publication and graphic basics, nd how to implement those basics in Corel Draw. The book is not designed to be a manual on all the features of Corel Draw, and may not cover everything for publications either, but it definitely gets one started. If one needs to make a decision between buying Corel Draw and other software that might be cheaper and more simple to use, this book can make buying Corel Draw worthwhile because it gets you going on features and methods not brought upfront by Corel or in Corel's user manual that comes with the software.
Or you can see how everything “stacks up” by going to tools->object manager (see image). This creates a pane on the right hand side that lists all the objects and shows their order (see image). You can change their order by dragging them around. You can also select an object by clicking on it and multiple objects by clicking on them with the shift key.
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
It sure is possible! Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. Insert a Current Page Number marker (Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number) in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended), select the first page of your section, open the Numbering and Section Options dialog, and enter 200 in the Start Page Numbering at: field. Hope this helps!
You can use Microsoft Word to create complex documents. Books and other large documents occasionally require different page number formats in different sections of one document. For example, you can number the index pages with Roman numerals (for example, "i.", "ii.", "iii.") and the main document with Arabic numerals (for example, "1", "2", "3"). This article describes how to set up different page numbering formats.

This simple technique makes quick work of a single-level numbered list and accommodates multiple lists within the same document. However, it doesn't work with multilevel lists. If you must work with an existing document, modify the heading style as shown above. Then, select each heading and apply the heading style that you modified by adding a numbering scheme. As I mentioned, this isn't possible if the existing document already employs the heading style. But if you face numbering headings in a document, you know you've got the request covered—and you won't lose a minute's composure. Just tell them, "Yes, I can do that."
You can insert page numbers on the current page, all pages, all odd pages, or all even pages. When you insert page numbers on multiple pages, a new master layer is automatically created, and the page number is placed on it. The master layer can be an all-page master layer, an odd-page master layer, or an even-page master layer. For more information about master layers, see Creating layers.
Publisher 2010 includes various typography commands that are designed to help you embellish your text. Although Publisher's developers have touted this as a significant feature, it's important to note that many of these effects only work with a small number of fonts, such as Calibri, Cambria, and Gabriola. Still, if you're using these fonts the typography commands can enhance the appearance of your text.
There is a rectangle on the screen with a drop shadow behind it. This is the document. At the upper left side there is a drop down that might say “letter” or “broadsheet” or “custom”. Pull it down and select “custom” (see image). Next to that pull-down there are 2 boxes with horizontal and vertical dimensions of the page. If you are using a laser etcher, you should set these to 24”x18”.
For some documents, though, you’ll want to get a little fancier. For example, what if you don’t want the page number to appear on the first page of the document (or on the first page of each section)? Or what if you want the page number placement to be different on odd and even pages, the way it is in a book? Or what if you have different sections that you want to be numbered differently—like an introduction or table of contents where you want Roman numerals instead of the Arabic numerals used in the rest of your document?
Each document in your book can be numbered, and these numbers can be used as automatic chapter numbers. Automatic will increment from the previous document’s number, or you can choose “Same as Previous in Book” if it’s still the same chapter but broken into two or more parts, or you can arbitrarily number it anything you want to. This can save time if you have a large number of chapters that change order frequently, since the numbers will update automatically.
If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.
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