Would you like to learn to create sharp, powerful graphics for your own small business? Have you been tasked with designing brochures, business cards, sales or feature sheets, slides, or other graphic materials for your employer? If you have an eye for design and a basic knowledge of computers, with the help of CorelDRAW Graphics Suite and BRING IT HOME WITH CORELDRAW: A GUIDE TO IN-HOUSE GRAPHIC DESIGN, you can start producing impressive, professional-looking ads and marketing materials today. The book's step-by-step guidance and wealth of tips, tricks, and techniques will quickly teach you the fundamentals of clear, effective visual communication and how to structure compelling promotional pieces and ads for your company. Along the way, you'll learn: • How to set up and customize CorelDRAW to make things easier. • The basic elements of design, including typography, color, and resolution. • How to create layouts with ease, including the use of templates and styles. • How to produce company ID packages and a variety of collateral pieces. • The best way to get your finished pieces from CorelDRAW to the printer. Learn to create eye-catching marketing materials that are easy on the budget. BRING IT HOME WITH CORELDRAW: A GUIDE TO IN-HOUSE GRAPHIC DESIGN is your fast, friendly guide to producing great-looking graphics in-house.
Could you maybe write an article about numbered lists and levels specifically. I’ve been struggling with the “restart after previous level” option. I’ll briefly describe my problem. I have a level one and two numbered paragraph list style. I don’t want the first level to display the number so I delete the number placeholder. When you do this the level 2 doesn’t restart anymore. Is there an option to restart numbering after a certain paragraph style instead of having to manually click the restart numbering option. The “start at” option (set to 1 for ex.) gives every paragraph in the list the number one which also boggles me. What’s the point of the “start at” option?
Hi Enas, it sounds like the issue you are experiencing is about the PDF Export process. Have a look at this thread on the Adobe Community support forum:http://forums.adobe.com/thread/615575 It seems to suggest that corrupt image files can cause problems like this. You also might want to check that you enough space on the disk you’re exporting the PDF too – if it runs out of room then you would get errors. Sorry I can’t help much more than give you some general ideas. Best of luck resolving the issue. Cheers Philippa

There is a rectangle on the screen with a drop shadow behind it. This is the document. At the upper left side there is a drop down that might say “letter” or “broadsheet” or “custom”. Pull it down and select “custom” (see image). Next to that pull-down there are 2 boxes with horizontal and vertical dimensions of the page. If you are using a laser etcher, you should set these to 24”x18”.
I should mention that the kind of bitmap I have selected here is probably not going to make a good object. It's more for line art and logos.If you were to look closely at the conversion of the bitmap you would find that it has create hundreds (thousands?) of arbitrary regions which it has filled with different colors. I have yet to find anything I could do to such an object that I couldn't do with the original bitmap. Still -- pretty nifty! In this case, I only wanted to show the dialog box, not the result so it's OK.

Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.
From time to time, I'm hired to design a mascot for a sports team. These tend to be some of my favorite projects, but also some of the more challenging projects as well. I tend to look at a mascot design like an icon for a logo. There are many similarities between the two. First the image should be clear and easy for the viewer to make out. I prefer to use simple shapes to make a somewhat more complicated image, but not too complicated. I want it to be stylized, not ultra-realistic. I also want something that is easily produced on apparel, signs, print and more. The goal is to make the design look like it was easy to create, even if it wasn't.
Help! Having a problem. I realize this is for CS5, which may be the issue. I’m working in CS6, and when I do this, it changes page 1 to a right-side page, completely affecting all of the spreads. I’ve tried to go into Document Setup to force it back, but it ends up making TWO right side pages for the first two pages! Perhaps a difference in versions, or maybe a bug?
InDesign’s automatic page numbers work well enough, but what about special cases? Some documents require pages to be omitted from total page counts. Other documents use several different systems. Sometimes section numbers or special codes must be included. Well, don’t start typing in those numbers manually, because InDesign can handle it—and quite gracefully, too.
Now go to File > Export > File format, and choose .CPT. In the export dialog, now choose Maintain Layers. It will convert all layers with curve objects, into individual objects in Corel PHOTO-PAINT, with the names retained. So remember to place all curves into individual layers in CorelDRAW before exporting to CPT. If you’re working for print choose 300 dpi of course, and make sure that you work in the same color space etcetera.

Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.
Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
Centerline and outline give you various choices (see image). The first is what kind of art you start with. Ideally, you simply select whatever type of bitmap it is. The other two things you should play with are detail and smoothing. Usually you will want to delete the original image and remove the background but there are times when that’s not what you want.
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An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
Most of the people will tell you that Adobe's are better. Well, I use Adobe because I love Photoshop (I haven't seen any other software so powerful for photographs) and it's got a wider range of users. But, for certain tasks, I use Corel Draw, and I always say to myself "isn't this a great piece of software". It has nothing to envy to others. But it is a case of personal preference.
Select the text frame with the Selection Tool (V, Escape) and go to Edit > Copy and Edit > Paste. Manoeuvre this second text frame onto the left-hand page in a mirrored position. InDesign will provide pop-up guidelines once the text frame lines up exactly with the frame on the right-hand page. Once your happy with the positioning, select the Type Tool (T) and adjust the orientation of the text to Align Left from the Character Formatting Controls panel, as before.
Choose the color and font scheme for your brochure. Each brochure template comes with a default color and font scheme, but if you wish to use a different color or font scheme, you can do so by selecting the appropriate new scheme. Choose a new color scheme from one of the named color schemes in the Color Scheme dropdown and a new font from the Font Scheme dropdown.
Now, right-click the Background object and choose Duplicate. Go to New Lens > Grayscale. You now have two obejcts of the brick wall. Choose New Lens > Grayscale, drag the Opacity slider, in my case, to 80. Go to Merge Mode > Overlay. This creates a more intense feel to the brick wall. This places the Grayscale Lens Object over the duplicated brick wall photo object.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
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