Centerline and outline give you various choices (see image). The first is what kind of art you start with. Ideally, you simply select whatever type of bitmap it is. The other two things you should play with are detail and smoothing. Usually you will want to delete the original image and remove the background but there are times when that’s not what you want.
Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.
We'll work with the existing heading styles. When applying this technique to your own documents, you can modify the heading styles to reflect the properties you need—you're not stuck with the default settings. If, however, the built-in heading styles are already in use because you're working with an existing document, you'll have to create new styles. Avoid this route when possible. We'll be changing properties for the numbering scheme and not the actual heading styles.
3.  Although you could type the names directly into the word, it is easier to use your favorite word processing program. Type in the names you want, leaving an extra space between them. You could also put a dash or dot between the names. Just type the names end-to-end and let them go to the next line automatically as you type (do not use a “carriage return”).  Use a plain typeface with a point size of 12 to 14.  Figure 3.
7.  You can remove the outline and let the edge of the words give the object a hard edge.  You can also fill the object with a color or even make the word or number solid black and the class names white by using the Type Tool and highlight all the names and select a white fill AND a white outline for the names (to make them bolder) from the color palette. Figure 8.
In the Object Manager Docker, click on New Lens again and choose Tone Curve Lens. For my photo I applied a small S-curve, dragging the lower left side down, giving me a tone value of X 74 and Y 45, which works great. You don’t nee to be too exact here with the value. This way I get a darker and more defined feel and removing that milky grey feel the photo originally had. Decide for yourself by looking at the effect as you adjust the image. Go with what works for your image. And go back and adjust again if needed later on.
Vector graphics uses primitives of geometry such as curves, shapes and lines. These primitives allow the user to create images that can be infinitely magnified without reducing the image's quality, explains TechTerms. In addition to this, images exported from the program keep their vector graphics qualities and can be used in other forms of editing software as well. Simply put, CorelDraw, as a vector graphics editor is made for users to create logos that are useable on various images and items, such as posters, logos, and business cards.
Changing the numbering display affects how pages are indicated in the InDesign document, as in the Pages panel and in the page box at the bottom of a document window. The numbering display also affects how you specify page ranges when printing and exporting the document. However, the numbering display does not change the appearance of page numbers on document pages.
Word numbers all your pages, but those numbers remain hidden unless you tell Word to display them. By inserting a field code anywhere on the page, you can tell Word to reveal the page number. This option gives you fine control over page numbers. It also lets you put numbers anywhere you need and not just in the headers, footers, and margins. For example, you could put them in a text box if you wanted to.
The easiest way to implement a numbering scheme for headings is to add one to a heading style. To illustrate, we'll modify Heading 1 by adding a numbering scheme. First, right-click Heading 1 in the Styles gallery (in the Styles group on the Home tab). Then, choose Modify as shown in Figure A to launch the Modify Style dialog. If you thumb through the default properties, you'll not find a numbering scheme (Figure B). Click the Format button and choose Numbering as shown in Figure B. If necessary, click the Numbering tab. Choose the predefined scheme that's the best match for what you want (Figure C).
If you inserted page numbers at the top or bottom of the page, the header or footer area of your document automatically opens up, and you can make any addition you like around your new page numbers. When you’re ready to get back to your document, you can tap the “Close Header & Footer” button on the Ribbon or double-click anywhere in your document outside the header or footer area.

Text will automatically resize to fit the box in most cases. If you need to set the text to a certain size, either select "AutoFit Text" from the Format menu and then select "Do Not Autofit" (Publisher 2003 and 2007) or select "Text Fit" in the Text group of the Text Box Tools Format ribbon and then select "Do Not Autofit" (Publisher 2010). You can then manually select a new text size.
Step two is to brainstorm and gather reference images. Reference images don't just have to be images of what you plan on drawing and in some cases you may not know exactly what you are drawing until you have options. While browsing the internet you may come across a logo with a color theme you really like, or perhaps you like the lettering style or font used on a different design. I spend a good deal of time getting inspired but taking care to not let the images I find influence my design too much. The goal is to make something unique. I create a new file in CorelDRAW and name it. Then I browse the internet looking for inspiration. If I find something I like, I copy then paste it in that new CorelDRAW file. You can also utilize Corel CONNECT to browse content. To do this I recommend, in CorelDRAW, going to Windows > Dockers > Connect. Once the docker is visible at the top of the docker you can search for images. I really like searching for reference photos on iStock. If you plan on using the image you find in a design, you must purchase the image so you can legally use it.
You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.
The book have many examples, and those examples come with tutorials. However, the tutorials are design specific, and apply to the example. For instance, a logo is created of a lighthouse. You learn some features of Corel, but its not meant to show all the features of Corel. One drawback of the book is that it relies on keyboard shortcuts and does not tell you where to go in the application on many instances. But, I believe the book is more or less trying to go through the methodology of using Corel, not showing you a step by step for every function. If the book had more concentration on using the mouse and where to find features in the user interface, and for screen captures, I would have rated it a 5-star.
In a legal document, it's rare for every paragraph in the document to be numbered. Usually, you change between numbered paragraphs and non-numbered (plain) paragraphs of text. When Word sees you switching between these types of formats, it usually tries to help by restarting your numbered list back at "1" (or the first value of your list, such as "A"). There are a few different ways to make the number follow the last number of your paragraphs. In Word, this is called Continue from Previous List.
In 2012 the joint LibreOffice/re-lab team implemented libcdr, a library for reading CDR files from version 7 to X3 and CMX files.[47] The library has extensive support for shapes and their properties, including support for color management and spot colors, and has a basic support for text.[48] The library provides a built-in converter to SVG, and a converter to OpenDocument is provided by writerperfect package. The libcdr library is used in LibreOffice starting from version 3.6,[49] and thanks to public API it can be freely used by other applications.
The selection tool is the very first tool in the tool bar on the left (see image). It has a rectangular picker and a freehand picker but most of the time you will simply click on an object. It helps if you click on an edge. One caveat: if there are multiple objects and some are in front of some others the program will select the object that’s in front. In those cases you can use the “Object Manager” (tool->object manager) to get the exact object you want. More on this in step 10.
Now that you’ve created the separate section, you can change the format of the page numbers there. The first thing you’ll want to do is break the link between your new preliminary section and the next section where the main body of your document starts. To do that, open up the header or footer area (wherever you have your page numbers) in the main section of your document. On the “Design” tab in the “Header & Footer Tools” section of the Ribbon, click the “Link to Previous” option to break the link to the previous section’s header and footer.

When the “Current Page Number” placeholder sits on a master page, every page to which you assigned that specific master page will display this variable – the number will change automatically on every page. If you change the style assigned to the placeholder on the master page (let’s say you set it to bold), all page numbers will update to that style (all numbers will become bold).
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