I should mention that the kind of bitmap I have selected here is probably not going to make a good object. It's more for line art and logos.If you were to look closely at the conversion of the bitmap you would find that it has create hundreds (thousands?) of arbitrary regions which it has filled with different colors. I have yet to find anything I could do to such an object that I couldn't do with the original bitmap. Still -- pretty nifty! In this case, I only wanted to show the dialog box, not the result so it's OK.
Warning  Making even minor changes to an outline numbering scheme won't necessarily change the initial position you've selected in the gallery, but rather may create a new gallery position, overwriting an existing one. Because of this problem, attaching numbering to styles is strongly recommended. This is covered in greater detail later in this chapter and in the chapter on Styles.
I love working with bullets and numbered lists in InDesign, I think it’s a quick and easy way to add some structure to your lists or title formats in your document. But I often see people avoiding this option because they think it’s either hard to master or complicated to manage. Let’s go over a few quick formatting tips when working with bullets and numbered lists in InDesign.
You can insert page numbers on the current page, all pages, all odd pages, or all even pages. When you insert page numbers on multiple pages, a new master layer is automatically created, and the page number is placed on it. The master layer can be an all-page master layer, an odd-page master layer, or an even-page master layer. For more information about master layers, see Creating layers.
You can insert page numbers on the current page, all pages, all odd pages, or all even pages. When you insert page numbers on multiple pages, a new master layer is automatically created, and the page number is placed on it. The master layer can be an all-page master layer, an odd-page master layer, or an even-page master layer. For more information about master layers, see Creating layers.

In records containing punctuation, enclose data in a single occurrence of subfield ǂq in parentheses. Enclose data in multiple occurrences of subfield ǂq in one set of parentheses and separate individual occurrences of subfield ǂq with a space, semicolon, space. Omit any punctuation from the end of the field unless it ends with an ellipsis, hyphen, closing parenthesis, exclamation point, question mark, or period following an abbreviation.
I am trying to customize our Oracle Receivables invoice program for Release 12.0.6. I am modifying the seeded RAXINV.rdf because I need to add three fields into the query. I am adding the three columns in the data model and the Common Query user parameter. I am planning on using BIP to customize the layout. The issue I have with modifying the custom RAXINV.rdf is this. Everytime I modify the data model and the COmmon Query parameter, some of the object names change by appending a "1" to the object name (i.e. BILL_CUST_NAME become BILL_CUST_NAME1). Is there a better way of customizing the invoice? I would like to by pass Oracle Reports if at all possible.
I love working with bullets and numbered lists in InDesign, I think it’s a quick and easy way to add some structure to your lists or title formats in your document. But I often see people avoiding this option because they think it’s either hard to master or complicated to manage. Let’s go over a few quick formatting tips when working with bullets and numbered lists in InDesign.
This video gives and example of raffle ticket numbering using number pro with InDesign to create the numbering needed for 200 tickets. From creating the data file needed to laying out the document and finally the finished file ready for printing. Number-pro is an easy to use, stand alone application that can be used with InDesign, Corel Draw, Word, Publisher and any other desktop publishing or graphics software that allows for a mail merge function. From raffle tickets to multi part forms Number-Pro can make the whole process much easier.
In Japanese, Chinese, or Korean versions, by default, Arabic numerals are used for page numbers. However, if you use the Numbering & Section Options command, you can specify the style of numbering, such as Roman numerals, Arabic numerals, Kanji, and so on. The Style option allows you to select the number of digits in the page number, for example, 001 or 0001. Each part of the document that uses a different numbering style is called a section. For more information on sections, see Define section numbering.
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