You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.
Now, right-click the Background object and choose Duplicate. Go to New Lens > Grayscale. You now have two obejcts of the brick wall. Choose New Lens > Grayscale, drag the Opacity slider, in my case, to 80. Go to Merge Mode > Overlay. This creates a more intense feel to the brick wall. This places the Grayscale Lens Object over the duplicated brick wall photo object.
Use "Format Page Numbers" for specific changes, like types of numbers and chapter headings. If you want to go the extra mile, double-click on the header or footer once again. Click "Page Numbers," then click "Format Page Numbers" under the menu that appears. From here, you can set different types of numbers, like Roman numerals or letters, as well as customize the basic appearance of numbers. It is not incredibly robust, but it works.
With Corel PHOTO-PAINT & CorelDRAW, creating street art images, and later printing them out as stencils, is no problem. Actually, you have the perfect graphic software for this in front of you. Creating a Street Art editorial illustration for a magazine is no different, you just need a few extra tweaks and learn the word ’Superimposed’. This Street Art illustration will be placed on a brick wall. In others words, there is photo maniplualtion in play here.
From time to time, I'm hired to design a mascot for a sports team. These tend to be some of my favorite projects, but also some of the more challenging projects as well. I tend to look at a mascot design like an icon for a logo. There are many similarities between the two. First the image should be clear and easy for the viewer to make out. I prefer to use simple shapes to make a somewhat more complicated image, but not too complicated. I want it to be stylized, not ultra-realistic. I also want something that is easily produced on apparel, signs, print and more. The goal is to make the design look like it was easy to create, even if it wasn't.
The next step depends on what you are most comfortable using. You could start sketching things out in CorelDRAW, maybe use a graphics tablet, or in my case I like to use an old fashioned pencil and pad of paper. I have a small notepad that I doodle in, but sometimes I might make small sketches on post-it notes. I like to make my sketches small because I feel like those small thumbnail drawings lend themselves well to simple and clean layouts. The larger my sketches are, the more detail I tend to create and for projects like this you don't always need a bunch of detail. My sketches aren't pretty. They are just supposed to get me in the ball park (no pun intended). You just want to get a basic look and feel to work from. Don't get discouraged if your sketches aren't exactly what you had in mind. You will be able to fine-tune the design as you go. I created several little thumbnail sketches. And pick one, sometimes two, to build from.

One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.

All of this happens in the Bullets & Numbering dialog box, shown below. You will definitely want to use paragraph styles for this. My first one is called Chapter title. You will need to begin by changing the List Type to Numbers for all of the levels, and you must both name the List and use the same named list for all Levels. You do this by selecting the List > New List.


As a vector graphics editor, CorelDraw is used primarily for marketing and advertising businesses, particularly those that specialize in print advertising development. Outside of logos, CorelDraw is a program used in the professional space to create brochures, newsletters and various other printable documents using its page layout features. Furthermore users use the program to create complex drawings.
If you wanted to have a set number of rows for page 1, set by using "xsl:variable name="lpp" select="number(15)"/", but page 2 through the final page you wanted 20 rows, how would you set this after the initial page break? My latest attempt was to use set-get method for the variable lpp and re-setting it after the page break to 20, but then my line numbering starts at 21 instead of 16 on the second page. Do you have any suggestions or examples for this?
Keep your layout fairly but not absolutely symmetrical. Putting the balance point slightly to the left or right of center can make the brochure more visually interesting. Do allow enough white space to make the text and graphics easier to read. While most of your text should be either left-justified or full-justified, you can sparingly use right-justification to add emphasis.
In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.
I am creating a file in inDesign for a client that is asking for numbered tickets. They'd like to be able to print a specific number for each ticket. I've read some of the older answers for similar questions that refer to Data Merge, but I'd prefer not to take that route if avoidable. What I'd ultimately like to do is create a space for the numbers to go, select the number of pages within the Print menu, and have the spaces populate with the corresponding numbers while printing.
Now that you’ve created the separate section, you can change the format of the page numbers there. The first thing you’ll want to do is break the link between your new preliminary section and the next section where the main body of your document starts. To do that, open up the header or footer area (wherever you have your page numbers) in the main section of your document. On the “Design” tab in the “Header & Footer Tools” section of the Ribbon, click the “Link to Previous” option to break the link to the previous section’s header and footer.
Text will automatically resize to fit the box in most cases. If you need to set the text to a certain size, either select "AutoFit Text" from the Format menu and then select "Do Not Autofit" (Publisher 2003 and 2007) or select "Text Fit" in the Text group of the Text Box Tools Format ribbon and then select "Do Not Autofit" (Publisher 2010). You can then manually select a new text size.
Change the label options from Normal Paper to Labels. When you do this, a long list of label types will become available in the options dialog. There are hundreds of label types for every manufacturer, such as Avery and others. Most people in the US will want to go to AVERY Lsr/Ink. Many other brands of paper sheets will include the matching Avery numbers on their products.
Choose the color and font scheme for your brochure. Each brochure template comes with a default color and font scheme, but if you wish to use a different color or font scheme, you can do so by selecting the appropriate new scheme. Choose a new color scheme from one of the named color schemes in the Color Scheme dropdown and a new font from the Font Scheme dropdown.
Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. A Current Page Number marker must be set on pages in order to use this feature. The Current Page Number is a special character inserted in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended) where the page number will appear, by selecting Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number.

I am trying to customize our Oracle Receivables invoice program for Release 12.0.6. I am modifying the seeded RAXINV.rdf because I need to add three fields into the query. I am adding the three columns in the data model and the Common Query user parameter. I am planning on using BIP to customize the layout. The issue I have with modifying the custom RAXINV.rdf is this. Everytime I modify the data model and the COmmon Query parameter, some of the object names change by appending a "1" to the object name (i.e. BILL_CUST_NAME become BILL_CUST_NAME1). Is there a better way of customizing the invoice? I would like to by pass Oracle Reports if at all possible.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.

In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.


The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.

There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
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