This is a good book for someone that is new to Corel Draw, and needs to use Corel Draw for publications. The book is a mix of publication and graphic basics, nd how to implement those basics in Corel Draw. The book is not designed to be a manual on all the features of Corel Draw, and may not cover everything for publications either, but it definitely gets one started. If one needs to make a decision between buying Corel Draw and other software that might be cheaper and more simple to use, this book can make buying Corel Draw worthwhile because it gets you going on features and methods not brought upfront by Corel or in Corel's user manual that comes with the software.

In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.
One of the key components of CorelDraw is its brushes. According to the Corel Corporation themselves, CorelDraw uses specially designed brushes to help with detailed image creation. These brushes give the designer the ability to create realistic or incredibly stylized images. In addition to its various brushes, CorelDraw also incorporates the use of layers. Through layers, graphics designers are able to create pictures that overlap each other without interacting. Layers help with different aspects of image creation, such as shading and coloring.
An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
Most of the people will tell you that Adobe's are better. Well, I use Adobe because I love Photoshop (I haven't seen any other software so powerful for photographs) and it's got a wider range of users. But, for certain tasks, I use Corel Draw, and I always say to myself "isn't this a great piece of software". It has nothing to envy to others. But it is a case of personal preference.

Or you can see how everything “stacks up” by going to tools->object manager (see image). This creates a pane on the right hand side that lists all the objects and shows their order (see image). You can change their order by dragging them around. You can also select an object by clicking on it and multiple objects by clicking on them with the shift key.

There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
×