It sure is possible! Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. Insert a Current Page Number marker (Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number) in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended), select the first page of your section, open the Numbering and Section Options dialog, and enter 200 in the Start Page Numbering at: field. Hope this helps!
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
In December 2006 the sK1 open-source project team started to reverse-engineer the CDR format.[38] The results and the first working snapshot of the CDR importer were presented at the Libre Graphics Meeting 2007 conference taking place in May 2007 in Montreal (Canada).[39] Later on the team parsed the structure of other Corel formats with the help of the open source CDR Explorer.[40] As of 2008, the sK1 project claims to have the best import support for CorelDraw file formats among open source software programs. The sK1 project developed also the UniConvertor, a command line open source tool which supports conversion from CorelDraw ver.7-X4 formats (CDR/CDT/CCX/CDRX/CMX) to other formats. UniConvertor is also used in Inkscape and Scribus open source projects as an external tool for CorelDraw files importing.[41][42][43]
It depends what the design is for the tickets. But if you set up primary text frames, linked for the area for the numbers, you can create a numbered list with the numbering format you want. Then, just pour in a whole load of paragraph returns that have that numbered list applied. And make sure each numbered paragraph is set to start in the next column.
UPDATE: I was able to fix this by DEselecting “Allow Document Pages to Shuffle” and “Allow Spreads to Shuffle.” Or perhaps I only need to do one of those, but I was trying everything in the book and happen to uncheck those. Once I deselected those, I was able to move the spreads back to the way they needed to be. Of course, I had to do each of them individually, which would be tedious if you had a very large document already created. Definitely something that I will have to remember to do at the beginning of creating a document. (Luckily, this particular one is only six pages.) I’m wondering if there is a quicker way if this issue returned.
23 Feb 2010[23] X5 (15) 7 to X5 7 to X5 XP, Vista, 7, 8 Built-in content organizer (CorelConnect), CD, web graphics and animation tools, multi-core performance improvement, digital content (professional fonts, clip arts, and photos), object hinting, pixel view, enhanced Mesh tool with transparency options, added touch support, and new supported file formats.[24] It has developed Transformation, which makes multiple copies of a single object.

With the Segment dimension tool, you also have the ability to measure the distance between the two most distant nodes in multiple segments. Using the Segment dimension tool , marquee select the segments, drag to position the dimension line, and click where you want to place the dimension text. You can also measure successive segments automatically by clicking the Automatic successive dimensioning button on the property bar, and marquee select the segments that you want to measure. Drag to the location where you want to place the dimension text and release.

While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
Anyway, one of the cardinal rules in my kitchen is that the best tools are the most versatile ones. Sure, I did once buy a combination avocado pitter and masher. But it ended up in the trash as I found guacamole came out just as good when I used a fork. Likewise, some of my favorite InDesign tools can be used for all kinds of purposes. Take for example cross-references. In issue 95 of InDesign Magazine, Peter Kahrel showed how to use cross-references to overcome all kinds of tricky problems with footnotes. You can also use cross-references to do cool stuff like automatically type the last page number in a book, which is not possible to do with a text variable since the scope of text variables is limited to the current document. Here’s how to do it.
GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.
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