You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.
In its first versions, the CDR file format was a completely proprietary file format primarily used for vector graphic drawings, recognizable by the first two bytes of the file being "WL". Starting with CorelDraw 3, the file format changed to a Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF) envelope, recognizable by the first four bytes of the file being "RIFF", and a "CDR*vrsn" in bytes 9 to 15, with the asterisk "*" being in early versions just a blank.[33] Beginning with CorelDraw 4 it included the version number of the writing program in hexadecimal ("4" meaning version 4, "D" meaning version 14). The actual data chunk of the RIFF remains a Corel proprietary format.
We have a variable 'invLines' and we are loading the members of the G_LINES group where the TYPE is equal to 'LINE'. Notice we use an XPATH expression to do this. We also use the 'incontext' command to ensure we are picking up the lines only for the current position i.e. within the current invoice. For this example remember we have no invoice header so we pick up all lines into the tree.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
Applying a character style to your bullet or numbered list character allows you to apply any formatting you want … except for an underline. Even the activation of the underline option in the character style settings will result in InDesign completely ignoring you. For some reason this feature is unfortunately unsupported so it’s up to you to try to be creative with this. One possibility would be to use a Paragraph Rule (if possible) and just play with the Left- and Right Indent.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.
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Now I can start creating vector shapes over the sketch. I start by selecting the Freehand Tool (Toolbox > Freehand Tool or keyboard shortcut F5). The Freehand Tool works in a few different ways. If you click and hold down the mouse button, the line will follow the path of your mouse curser and you can create curved lines. However, if you click once and let go and move your mouse cursor to another point on your workspace then click a second time, you will create a straight line. The goal is to create “closed” shapes, so start the next line by clicking on the end point of the line you just created. Finally, the last line of the shape should end by clicking on the very first point you started with. You know the shape is closed when you can apply fill or color to the shape.

When you're working on a document such as a magazine or a book with many pages in it, using the master page feature in Adobe InDesign CC 2015 to insert automatic page numbering simplifies working with the document. On a master page, you designate the position, font, and size of the page numbers and any additional text you want to accompany the numbers such as the magazine name, date or the word "Page." Then that information appears on every page of the document along with the correct page number. As you work, you can add and remove pages or rearrange entire sections, and the numbers remain accurate.


Click on the section of the document to which you want content added. Your document will feature multiple frames, into which text or pictures can be added. In most cases, Publisher places example text and photos in each template to provide you with a general idea of how to write and format your document. For example, if creating an envelope, Publisher inserts dummy addresses in the appropriate text frames on the document so you can replace the text with your own information.
I always loved the option to add a Swatch from within the Paragraph Style options dialog by double clicking on the fill or stroke icon. But I noticed what I now think is a bug in Indesign CC. When you do this in Indesign CC, create a new swatch, then click ok or add, it doesn’t show up in the swatch list. You have to close and reopen the paragraph style options again.
A request for numbering headings in a new document doesn't have to elicit terror—it only sounds ghoulish. If you're good with styles, you might consider a custom numbered list style, but that's too much work. Instead, use Word's built-in heading styles for a painless process. My best advice is to get the numbering scheme in place before you create the document. Trying to number headings in an existing document really can cause nightmares!
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Erica Gamet has been involved in the graphics industry for an unbelievable 30 years! She is a speaker, writer, and trainer, focusing on Adobe InDesign and Illustrator, Apple Keynote and iBooks Author, and other print- and production-related topics. She is a regular presence at CreativePro Week’s PePcon and InDesign Conferences, and has spoken at ebookcraft in Canada and Making Design in Norway. You can find Erica’s online tutorials at CreativeLive and through her YouTube channel. When she isn’t at her computer, she can be found exploring her new homebase of Seattle and the greater Pacific Northwest.
If you inserted page numbers at the top or bottom of the page, the header or footer area of your document automatically opens up, and you can make any addition you like around your new page numbers. When you’re ready to get back to your document, you can tap the “Close Header & Footer” button on the Ribbon or double-click anywhere in your document outside the header or footer area.
In the Object Manager Docker, click on New Lens again and choose Tone Curve Lens. For my photo I applied a small S-curve, dragging the lower left side down, giving me a tone value of X 74 and Y 45, which works great. You don’t nee to be too exact here with the value. This way I get a darker and more defined feel and removing that milky grey feel the photo originally had. Decide for yourself by looking at the effect as you adjust the image. Go with what works for your image. And go back and adjust again if needed later on. how to numbe using coreldraw
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