A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.

Now, right-click the Background object and choose Duplicate. Go to New Lens > Grayscale. You now have two obejcts of the brick wall. Choose New Lens > Grayscale, drag the Opacity slider, in my case, to 80. Go to Merge Mode > Overlay. This creates a more intense feel to the brick wall. This places the Grayscale Lens Object over the duplicated brick wall photo object.
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.
When your first page is a title page, you might want to use a different footer or header for it than you use in the rest of your document and you might not want the page number to show up on that page. When you open your header or footer section by double-clicking somewhere in those areas, Word opens a new “Design” tab on the Ribbon in a section named “Header & Footer Tools.”
You can also set up page numbering so that the position of the page numbers is different on odd and even pages. You’ll find that most books take this approach so that the page number appears toward the left side on the left (even) pages and toward the right side on the right (odd) pages. This prevents the page numbers from being obscured by the book’s binding and makes them easier to see as you flip through pages.
From time to time, I'm hired to design a mascot for a sports team. These tend to be some of my favorite projects, but also some of the more challenging projects as well. I tend to look at a mascot design like an icon for a logo. There are many similarities between the two. First the image should be clear and easy for the viewer to make out. I prefer to use simple shapes to make a somewhat more complicated image, but not too complicated. I want it to be stylized, not ultra-realistic. I also want something that is easily produced on apparel, signs, print and more. The goal is to make the design look like it was easy to create, even if it wasn't.
Anyway, one of the cardinal rules in my kitchen is that the best tools are the most versatile ones. Sure, I did once buy a combination avocado pitter and masher. But it ended up in the trash as I found guacamole came out just as good when I used a fork. Likewise, some of my favorite InDesign tools can be used for all kinds of purposes. Take for example cross-references. In issue 95 of InDesign Magazine, Peter Kahrel showed how to use cross-references to overcome all kinds of tricky problems with footnotes. You can also use cross-references to do cool stuff like automatically type the last page number in a book, which is not possible to do with a text variable since the scope of text variables is limited to the current document. Here’s how to do it.
Text will automatically resize to fit the box in most cases. If you need to set the text to a certain size, either select "AutoFit Text" from the Format menu and then select "Do Not Autofit" (Publisher 2003 and 2007) or select "Text Fit" in the Text group of the Text Box Tools Format ribbon and then select "Do Not Autofit" (Publisher 2010). You can then manually select a new text size.
Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).

I am trying to customize our Oracle Receivables invoice program for Release 12.0.6. I am modifying the seeded RAXINV.rdf because I need to add three fields into the query. I am adding the three columns in the data model and the Common Query user parameter. I am planning on using BIP to customize the layout. The issue I have with modifying the custom RAXINV.rdf is this. Everytime I modify the data model and the COmmon Query parameter, some of the object names change by appending a "1" to the object name (i.e. BILL_CUST_NAME become BILL_CUST_NAME1). Is there a better way of customizing the invoice? I would like to by pass Oracle Reports if at all possible.


All of this happens in the Bullets & Numbering dialog box, shown below. You will definitely want to use paragraph styles for this. My first one is called Chapter title. You will need to begin by changing the List Type to Numbers for all of the levels, and you must both name the List and use the same named list for all Levels. You do this by selecting the List > New List.

Note that some versions of Word may have slightly different ways to create numbering. Each version of Word is slightly different, so some of the exact placement of buttons may change. However, all current versions of Word allow page numbering by double-clicking on the top or bottom of the page. This will allow you to open up the Page Number menu.[3]


I am creating a file in inDesign for a client that is asking for numbered tickets. They'd like to be able to print a specific number for each ticket. I've read some of the older answers for similar questions that refer to Data Merge, but I'd prefer not to take that route if avoidable. What I'd ultimately like to do is create a space for the numbers to go, select the number of pages within the Print menu, and have the spaces populate with the corresponding numbers while printing.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this: how to number using indesign
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