I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel. I then let InDesign CS4 do the merging. Here’s the formula.
Hi - are you creating your own tickets using the instructions on this page? If so, you can of course change the font and everything else in your Word document. If you are using the Raffle Ticket Creator app (app.raffleticketcreator.com) then you can't change the font size ... you'll just need to tinker with the exact words that you are including in order to get them to fit on the page. Hope that helps!
Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer. :-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed.

Making your own raffle tickets is a great task for your upcoming event or grand opening. You can create raffle tickets by using templates that are available on your computer and online template galleries. A raffle tickets can help your event by generating interest and excitement about the prizes offered by your organization. Customize the raffle ticket templates by adding your event details and custom numbering sequence.


Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package

CS2 (or earlier) “Cheesy” Numbering There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice. To ensure each number fills its own text frame, select the whole story (Command/Ctrl-A), open the Keep Options (Command/Ctrl-Option/Alt-K) and choose In Next Frame from the Start Paragraph pop-up menu.
Create a master frame in ID to hold the number and if I have more than one ticket on a page just link the frames. Apply a paragraph style that starts in a new frame for the numbers. Place the text file with a shift click and the numbers are formatted and the new pages are autoflowed. The number list is very easy to create in Excel with the auto fill feature for that type of thing.
Am I the only individual here who is using CS3, and trying the method described, only to find that my version (5.0.2) for the mac doesn’t have the options anywhere that the author suggests? I have spent the past 2 hours trying to find the same screenshots the author has, only to become reall discouraged. Perhaps he is using a windows version that is setup differently?
I had wanted to create a file that didn't require Excel as the data source, so I created one using SEQ fields. It was terrible and too huge to mention (thanks Doug Robbins), so I recreated it using Word as the data source so that people who only have Word can use it. You can create up to 5,000 tickets without changing the data file. If you only have Word and need to create more than 5,000 tickets, please don't type the ticket numbers. Just drop me an email and I'll create another data file for you with the required numbers.
But it’s not hard to duplicate and reduplicate until you have a thousand or more numbered tickets. I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count. I handle this much differently. I create a number list in Excel and save as a txt file.
I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count.
This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.

The trick is this: I creat an 'template' of the card, somewhere outside of the page. All object for data are text object, with all the formating needed. In place of the photo is an rectangle. The script read an text file (CSV) with the database, duplicate all template object, one by one and replace string in text object with the string from DB and import photo in place of the rectangle, redimension and convert to RGB or CMYK, acording to the initial data (atach.) When the page is full, create another one.
It was the paper size and multiple pages that was stumping me. However I do have a tip for those wanting a short cut to raffle books of 10. It is a little more fidgety so Im sure someone who is experienced with excel (Im not) but it will make the cutting perfect. Print out in sheets of ten and you just need to staple, cut and perforate...then you have 4-5 ready made raffle books.
Since it’s a group of people who have chosen to raise fund using this means the format of the raffle ticket has to be the one agreed upon by the group. The initial stages will thus be those of trial and error as each person will have his/her own opinion of what should be the format and design of the raffle ticket. This site recognizes that such challenges exist and the raffle ticket templates that we offer you will be in a design and format that most if not all of the people will fall in love with. After a certain format is accepted by everyone you will not have to worry about how to come up with new raffle tickets as these can be used over and over again.
The task of producing numbered tickets in Microsoft Word might seem pretty tough and strenuous especially for those people who are not skilled and trained in using Word files. There are quite a lot of people who have been left disappointed, disheartened and exasperated by their failures in attempting to explore how to create tickets for an event using Word templates. Many unanswered queries, doubts and confusions might have stood in the path of your success.
Am I the only individual here who is using CS3, and trying the method described, only to find that my version (5.0.2) for the mac doesn’t have the options anywhere that the author suggests? I have spent the past 2 hours trying to find the same screenshots the author has, only to become reall discouraged. Perhaps he is using a windows version that is setup differently?
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
Since it’s a group of people who have chosen to raise fund using this means the format of the raffle ticket has to be the one agreed upon by the group. The initial stages will thus be those of trial and error as each person will have his/her own opinion of what should be the format and design of the raffle ticket. This site recognizes that such challenges exist and the raffle ticket templates that we offer you will be in a design and format that most if not all of the people will fall in love with. After a certain format is accepted by everyone you will not have to worry about how to come up with new raffle tickets as these can be used over and over again.
    Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.
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