I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.
Number Pro does not create your raffle ticket or document it just allows an easy way to  number them. Check out Number Pro, take a look at the demo videos and even try the demo of Number Pro to see how it works. Number Pro is a cloud based application meaning there is no download of the application. We access the application online in the members area. They offer a three year membership with unlimited use.
We recently had to print 500 numbered tickets 8 up on 8.5 x 11. When we took it back to Bindery they would have had to hand collate the tickets back in order after the cut. So we came up with a way that when each stack was cut they would simply be stack on top of each other. We couldn’t figure out a way to add 8 sets of grouped numbers to 8-up layout so I had to go into the txt file and number it manually. It worked fine but took a little time. Is there an option to pull 8 different sets of numbers to one page?
The ticket numbering problem seems solved, if awkwardly. But what about linking automatic numbering of text references to a figure (e.g. “see fig.101″) to a legend of that figure (e.g. Fig. 101 shows….”)? Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author!

I basically used Bob Levine’s method (thanks) but wanted to add some extra detail – am using CS2 which is somewhat behind CS3 in this area. David, I was very discouraged to read your response to Josh on April 28th 2008. It seems your comment was quite dismissive to him with exactly no feedback help. He seemed to be looking for some more help trying to work through what you and the other InDesign gurus discuss as a “simple process”. I to, have read through your directions while using both mac & pc platforms. I fail to find the “standard features” screen shots that you show above in either program. I too have spent several hours trying to get the sequential 3-up numbering as described.
My script looks for the object-name and replaces all the numbers at the end of the text-string. Example: TEST010111 start: 9 how long is the number-string? 5 > TEST00009,TEST00010 and so on every marked object with the specified objectname will get the new string. I have another script that places the marked object(s) in a user-sized sheet after editing the quantity X and Y and the space between the objects.

You’re selling raffle tickets to make money, so why buy the tickets pre-printed? Using Microsoft Word’s mail merge function, you can create your own raffle tickets and design them any way you please. A mail merge doesn’t have to make mail; it is simply a way to define certainly elements of a document, then automatically insert variable elements, such as raffle ticket numbers. The most important thing to remember is that each ticket needs a mate–you don’t want to pull winning ticket number 81018 only to find that no one bought that one.

We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
Corel crashed repeatedly on my production person today while he was trying to number them using the plug-in. I couldn’t figure out how to make Mike’s script work. It appeared designed for variable numbers in one place. My customer needed her tickets numbered in two places, on the ticket and on the stub. Because she needs them tomorrow there is no time to send them out to be numbered manually. I’ll keep watching this space for more info. Thanks folks.
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.

The script sets the numbering of multiple gang up tickets so that after cutting the tickets do not need recollating to put back into order (like the CS2 script) but also does counterfoil numbers, prefixes, suffixes, leading zeros and output of pages in reverse order for ‘face up’ printing. The script is. Now I’m feeling rather dumb and frustrated. I just spent the last couple of hour numbering the tickets using keyboard shortcuts to detach the master and substitute numbers. Did 500 tickets this way. Corel crashed repeatedly on my production person today while he was trying to number them using the plug-in. I couldn’t figure out how to make Mike’s script work.
Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing. The script that Mike referred to worked very well with CS2 and was fairly easy to extend to doing counterfoil numbers as well, but doesn’t seem to work with CS3. I have thrown together a small online script to generate the contents of a data source file to do ticket numbering through the normal CS3 InDesign data merge routine.

I’m quite inclined to let the printer add the numbers. Less file size for me, less plates for me. I recently sent an invite to a digital printers, I offered to lay it up with all the names, they rejected the idea and said they could merge the names in as it printed. I guess it’s down to what you’re going to use it for. But if you’re going to print them yourself then by all means, if it’s going to a printer, best to check with them before you send anything definite over.
Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author! Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer.:-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed. how to number raffle tickets in word
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