In Excel, I created a file with columns A-H labeled: ticket 1, stub 1; ticket2, stub2; ticket3, stub3; ticket4, stub4. I then numbered two rows across 1 -4, then 5 -8. Then I dropped down to A – H in row 260. (I did this to give 1,000+ numbered tickets.) I then used the Excel fill function chosing series and told the program to skip by 4. It filled the rows. I then saved as a tab delimited text file.


Chuck, It does look as though using data merge is the best way, but rather than generating the numbers in Excel here is an improved number generator script to create indesign number and counterfoil numbering data merge files. We recently had to print 500 numbered tickets 8 up on 8.5 x 11. When we took it back to Bindery they would have had to hand collate the tickets back in order after the cut.

Below, we have a small and easy to follow tutorial on how to create sequentially numbered raffle tickets using Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel. Simply choose one of our 30 raffle ticket templates and download it to your computer. Next, begin the following tutorial. This tutorial will take you through the process of using Excel to create the numbering sequence, which you will then save, and import into Microsoft Word.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.

This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.

Canva’s drag and drop design features makes it easy to add your organization’s brand assets like logos and colors easily. Simply go to the uploads pane and choose a JPEG, PNG or SVG version of your logo to add to your design. Drag your logo to where it needs to be and resize by clicking or dragging on its edges. Change the template color scheme to your brand palette by clicking the color tool on the Canva toolbar. Pick the correct hue from the color wheel or input your color hexcode into the box.

Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.


I usually do my numbering in excel and save it as a tab delimited text file. I would put the starting number in A1 and insert a formula in A2 that is basically A1+1. Then I grab the lower right corner of that cell and while holding cmd (on Mac), I drag the cell down to A10 (or whatever number of pages you will be printing). This would auto populate the cells and change the formula to basically add 1 to the previous cell. Now go in B1 and insert a formula that adds 10 to A1 (or whatever number of pages you will be printing). In this example, the value should be 11. Then drag this cell to repeat the formula right to have the number of up you will have. The select A2 trough A10 and drag them the same way to populate the remaining cells. Save your excel file for future reference and save as tab delimited text. Open the file in textedit, find every tab and replace all with a paragraph change. Then import the file in investing in linked text boxes over your imposition.
In trying to produce 300 tickets, I can get all of the first numbered position to be sequential over 100 pages. But, when moving down to the second or third ticket position on the page and setting up the numbering, I repeatedly find that I get a repeat of the first 100 numbers. I am lost as to how to proceed. Is there any other missing step or info that I am assumed to have knowledge about that was not mentioned above? If you know of some other site that might explain this process any better, please post.
The tickets, all 2,000 of them, are printed on relatively good stock and are double-sided. They're perforated and when I'm selling tickets I don't have to struggle with separating them nor do I have any tearing disasters. I did shop around and at the time I purchased this was the best price I could find. They arrived promptly and hopefully we'll use so many of them raising money for our projects I'll have to order them again.

After dealing with the numbering problem, you also need to end up with single raffle tickets from the stub. The cutting and perforating bit can be quite a hustle depending on the number of raffle tickets that you are planning to sell. But this is something that can be done by one individual who is dedicated. All one would require is full size paper cutter together with an inexpensive tracing wheel to get over this stumbling block in whole process. You could also choose to enlist a group of people to help you out in this to finish this in a timely manner.

Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author! Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer.:-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed. how to number raffle tickets in word
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