Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
The current number of moviegoers is at an all-time high and the number is bound to increase even further. This implies that there will be a need to create more movie cinema joints and you definitely want your movie cinema to have an edge over the ones. You could see your movie ticket sales improve or have a high number when they debut by settling on the best and most appropriate movie ticket template. This site has been kind enough to offer you with the best and most presentable movie ticket templates that you could customize to generate movie tickets in an easier and more convenient way.

There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing. The script that Mike referred to worked very well with CS2 and was fairly easy to extend to doing counterfoil numbers as well, but doesn’t seem to work with CS3. I have thrown together a small online script to generate the contents of a data source file to do ticket numbering through the normal CS3 InDesign data merge routine.
I'm not sure about using an open office version of excel would work the same but create a file with your numbers in it starting with 0000 or however many 0's you need then click and hold in corner of cell and drag down, should auto populate. Document must be Saved As "text (tag delimited)" keep clicking ok. Save it this way only when completed somewhere you'll remember. Now go to inDesign and create one ticket. Add a text box and open data merge, navigate to the number file you just created and click/double click (don't remember) and an "options" box will open. This is where you setup your page size, bleeds, etc., I know multiple pages has to be checked. I think you can preview from this too and make necessary adjustments.
Getting Word to put a unique number on each raffle ticket is easy enough, but persuading Word to print out several uniquely-numbered raffle tickets per sheet of paper is very hard (I think it is impossible, actually. At least I couldn't figure it out. UPDATE: I did figure it out. Instructions for printing raffle tickets using Microsoft Word are here.). And you don't really want to have every raffle ticket use up a whole sheet of paper.
You need at least one space to make the autonumbering kick in. Now Option/Alt-click on the Autonumbering button in the Control panel (or choose Bullets and Numbering from the Control panel flyout menu) and choose the list you created in the Lists pop-up menu. You might want to adjust the other settings to match this: Now you’re done. Click OK and you should see the number appear in the text frame.
Your raffle might be subject to gaming commission or tax laws. Check with your municipality, state or province, and federal governments to make sure your raffle is legal. These government departments aren’t just enforcers. They are often great resources on how to run a successful fund raising raffle. Raffles are fun! Getting in trouble with the law or tax man is not.
I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks.
When you have Microsoft Publisher at your hand, you need not worry about running to stores to explore and buy tickets for organizing company day outs, vacation give away or a business board meeting. Microsoft Publisher provides you with several Word templates from which you can create event tickets with ease and skill. It even includes the fundamental chronological ordering required for raffles .once you get the ruse of setting up numbers in the ticket series, you can commence numbering in your own style.
Creating numbered tickets in Word can seem difficult or even impossible if you are not familiar with all the capabilities of the Word program. If you have tried going to the Word template section and have been unsuccessful or frustrated with all the options and questions, there is an easier way. The simplest resolution for creating numbered tickets is to find existing templates that can be edited and adjusted to fit your needs.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks....
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
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Chuck, It does look as though using data merge is the best way, but rather than generating the numbers in Excel here is an improved number generator script to create indesign number and counterfoil numbering data merge files. We recently had to print 500 numbered tickets 8 up on 8.5 x 11. When we took it back to Bindery they would have had to hand collate the tickets back in order after the cut.
Click "Save File" at the "Opening Raffle Ticket Setup" prompt. Go to your downloads folder and open the "Raffle Ticket.exe" file. Click "Run" at the security prompt. Click "Next" twice at the installation wizard prompt. Select "I accept" at the software terms. Enter your "User Name" and "Organization" details. Click "Next" twice and select "Install." The software loads on your computer. Click "Finish" to complete the installation.
This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.
The tickets, all 2,000 of them, are printed on relatively good stock and are double-sided. They're perforated and when I'm selling tickets I don't have to struggle with separating them nor do I have any tearing disasters. I did shop around and at the time I purchased this was the best price I could find. They arrived promptly and hopefully we'll use so many of them raising money for our projects I'll have to order them again.
Open a new blank document in Word. Create two raffle ticket designs, one for the person who buys the ticket and one for the organization selling them. Make sure to connect the two tickets, for example by making them in two-cell tables, side-by-side. Include the name of the organization, perhaps the first prize, and any other information you want on the buyer’s ticket. You might, for example, include spaces for the buyer’s name (“Name__________”) and phone number on the organization’s ticket. On both tickets, enter a dummy number for the raffle ticket number as a placeholder.
A raffle refers to a way of generating money by selling numbered tickets, then one or some of the sold tickets are drawn at random and the holder or holders of these tickets get to win a prize. This method of raising cash has been employed by many people especially groups which want to acquire an asset or start a certain project. It is thus not surprising when your child approaches you on how to come up with raffle to help his/her club raise some cash.
My script looks for the object-name and replaces all the numbers at the end of the text-string. Example: TEST010111 start: 9 how long is the number-string? 5 > TEST00009,TEST00010 and so on every marked object with the specified objectname will get the new string. I have another script that places the marked object(s) in a user-sized sheet after editing the quantity X and Y and the space between the objects.

Hi - are you creating your own tickets using the instructions on this page? If so, you can of course change the font and everything else in your Word document. If you are using the Raffle Ticket Creator app (app.raffleticketcreator.com) then you can't change the font size ... you'll just need to tinker with the exact words that you are including in order to get them to fit on the page. Hope that helps!

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