“raffle tickets with large numbers |how can I number raffle tickets in publisher”

If you’re intent on doing your tickets by hand, it’s recommended that only one person make them. That way, the handwriting will be consistent for each one, and it will be easier to spot a dupe if one occurs.

Press Ctrl+V for each additional row of labels you want. You want enough rows of labels to meet your entire needs. Thus, if you need a total of 125 labels, and you can get 3 labels per line, you should end up with 42 rows of labels.

1. Open Microsoft Word, click the ‘Start’ button and choose the ‘New’ command. Scroll all the way to the bottom of the template categories and select ‘More Categories.’ In the main window, click on ‘Tickets.’ Select the raffle ticket from the top row of templates that most closely matches the type of raffle ticket you want to make, then click on it to load the template into Word.

Number Press is a numbering application for forms, raffles, and documents. The program can be useful for printshops, organizations, clubs or any type of business that need to number their documents. Whether you’re a printshop looking to number 10,000 forms, or a club that needs to number a couple hundred raffle tickets – Number Press has you covered.

Tip: If your data source contains records that share the same information, and there are ten or fewer unique values in the column, you can filter by specific information. For example, if there are multiple records that list Australia as the country/region, you can filter on Australia.

Stop dragging when you’ve selected enough numbers. Note that while you’re holding the mouse button down, a tool tip will appear nearby displaying the number you’re up to. If you’ve gone too far, simply mouse back up.

Open Word and create a new document and create one raffle ticket. You want to make it about the right size so that you can fit four tickets on the page. Leave space for the ticket numbers, which you’ll add in a minute. Something like this:

Although the pronunciation of Hloom is up for grabs, they do have some great ticket templates. With 14 completely different templates, you should be able to find something you can use. You’ll find templates for dream home lotteries, cash prizes, and even one perfect for cancer charity fund raising.

I work at a quick copy shop as the in house designer. They JUST moved from manual numbering to digital and each job keeps building and getting worse since I brought digital numbering to their attention. I mean it’s super easy if there’s one number but two per ticket and 8 up? It’s hard with limited tools but doable.

Contact a manufacturer. Whether you’ve found a local ticket producer or an outlet online, you need to get a hold of them before you can order your tickets. Online companies will have their contact info somewhere on their webpage. Drop them a line, introduce yourself and let them know you’re interested in purchasing raffle tickets. Be sure to let them know roughly how many tickets you’re looking to buy, as well as the date you want to have them by. A representative should respond within a business day to take things forward from there.

To insert your ticket numbers, first click the area where you want the number to go. Then, click on Insert Merge Fields. A Dialog will pop up and “Numbers” should be selected. Click OK. You should see “<>” inserted into your document. You can insert the <> http://thedailyrant.net you want on the ticket and as many times as you wish.

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WordTemplatesBundle.com currently has 6 different templates available for free. Two of them are run-of-the-mill tickets that would be great for things like an office or classroom draw. The other four are the ones that are most helpful as they do automatic serial numbering.

Stapling and Padding: The charge for stapling in increments of 5,10,15,20 or 25 is $.06 per book. The charge for stapling into books of any other increment is $.09 per book. (Padding the raffle tickets is cheaper than stapling and makes it easy for you to divide into small groups.) * We’ve created a quick video to explain the difference between stapling and padding – have a look: Stapling and padding

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Thank you so much for this! These instructions were perfect and clear, and I got it all done, except when I go to print. It prints out 1 per page. I have Word 2007, and tried printing out on letter size with 4 per page, but then it prints them all very tiny in the corners. Can you help me? Thanks 🙂

Type the text that elaborates the organization that the raffle is meant to benefit, the date as well as the cost of each raffle ticket, the items that are to be worn and some space for the ticket holder’s information.

Now, you’ll define the actual merge values. In this case, it’s the Ticket Numbers field in the selected Excel workbook. Drag the Ticket Numbers field from the merge pane to the document (Figure G). After dropping the field control, I pressed [Enter] to replace Microsoft with the <> field.

I have 12 tickets up, and 1667 sheets. I have done numbering before, but they were 1 thru 12 on sheet one and had to be hand sorted. But that was 3,000 tickets. I have 4 versions of 20,000 for 80,000 this time.

If you need leading zeros then just format the column as text. The ticket numbering problem seems solved, if awkwardly. But what about linking automatic numbering of text references to a figure (e.g. “see fig.101″) to a legend of that figure (e.g. 101 shows.”)?

Create a raffle ticket template in Microsoft Word. Word allows you to generate text boxes for this purpose. Simply create two separate text boxes—one for the main ticket and another smaller one for the stub—and place them side-by-side on a page. Enter your raffle ticket information inside of each of the text boxes, then copy and paste the boxes throughout the page to complete your template.

2: Cut and Stack within Data Merge using a script I’ve made for the task: Episode 9: Cut and Stack Assistant script – YouTube  (the script is available from my website https://colecandoo.com/downloads/ for FREE).

When you have multiple tickets per page, you need to use a different numbering scheme. This link show how to use a merge with an Excel spreadsheet to create incrementing numbers: Publisher Auto-number Tickets Here’s another page on the same topic: Numbered Tickets in Publisher

You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.

Create the text frame for the numbers in InDesign and if there are more than one ticket per page, link them. Place the text file into the first frame with a shift click to auto flow and create new pages.

Adobe, I expected better! Hi Folks, I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel.

You may be tempted to place this number on a master page. That would make sense, but there’s a catch: Autonumbered paragraphs on a master page don’t update until you override them. That is, you have to Command/Ctrl-Shift-click on them to make them “kick in” and update to the correct number.

Yes, it is a pain to reprint one or two sheets if you have closed the file. I’ve learned to leave the file open on the desktop until the tickets are finished. This way if the perf, or cutter messes up I can easily reprint those ticket numbers without re-aligning the art & numbering.

Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word’s numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you’ll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.

I don’t want to have to data entry to finish each line. Will take forever. Is there a way to get a same, same format in microsoft word. I have used a sequence number generator to get a list. Its the comma and second duplicate # that is the problem.

Once you’re finished with the design, go to the “Mailings” ribbon to start the mail merge. You’ll see that the “Update Labels” is grayed out. Change that by clicking on Start Mail Merge > Labels > Cancel.

The very first step you need to do is to drag your cursor towards the Help icon in the new word document. This icon usually appears in the right part of the top portion of the tool bar listing. It is depicted by a question mark symbol. You have to left click on this menu with your mouse and you need to opt from the type of help listed in the drop-down carte du jour. (Ticket Invitation Templates Download)

I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I’m also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.

Printing raffle tickets on the back: The price is $15 per 1000 raffle tickets. If you want a logo or artwork printed on the back of the raffle tickets upload your artwork with your order and enter “print logo on back”: in the “back lines” section. You will receive an email proof before your raffle tickets are printed.

One Reply to ““raffle tickets with large numbers |how can I number raffle tickets in publisher””

  1. But it’s not hard to duplicate and reduplicate until you have a thousand or more numbered tickets. I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count. I handle this much differently. I create a number list in Excel and save as a txt file.
    Summary: If you need to include serial numbers in your printed matter (labels, letters, documents, etc.), the best way is through the use of Word’s mail-merge capabilities. This tip outlines how you can use this capability to get just the serial numbers you need. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
    I am trying to create Raffle Style tickets using Avery 16154 ticket stock.  I am working in Adobe InDesign CC.  Can someone tell me how to create sequentially numbered tickets in Adobe InDesign CC (I have found it for other versions which don’t work in CC). I need a ticket number on the “stub” and the same matching number on the tear off portion.  They are 10 tickets to an 8.5 X 11 page.
    Based loosely on how many tickets you hope to sell, enter a number in cell A1. Standard raffle practice tends toward numbers with at least a few digits, so instead of starting with 1 you might start with 10001.

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