I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel. I then let InDesign CS4 do the merging. Here’s the formula.
1. On the first hand, you need to initiate Microsoft Publisher. You can view a magnifying glass icon and you need to hit inside the little field which shows Available Templates page. Now you should type the Word ‘tickets’ and move your cursor towards the magnifying glass icon. Hit on it. Subsequently you need to evaluate and assess the ticket options in the Microsoft Publisher. After that you can double click on the desired template. For example if you want to open the raffle ticket template just double click on it for the Publisher to open it for you.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
The tickets, all 2,000 of them, are printed on relatively good stock and are double-sided. They're perforated and when I'm selling tickets I don't have to struggle with separating them nor do I have any tearing disasters. I did shop around and at the time I purchased this was the best price I could find. They arrived promptly and hopefully we'll use so many of them raising money for our projects I'll have to order them again.
I’m quite inclined to let the printer add the numbers. Less file size for me, less plates for me. I recently sent an invite to a digital printers, I offered to lay it up with all the names, they rejected the idea and said they could merge the names in as it printed. I guess it’s down to what you’re going to use it for. But if you’re going to print them yourself then by all means, if it’s going to a printer, best to check with them before you send anything definite over.
The trick is this: I creat an 'template' of the card, somewhere outside of the page. All object for data are text object, with all the formating needed. In place of the photo is an rectangle. The script read an text file (CSV) with the database, duplicate all template object, one by one and replace string in text object with the string from DB and import photo in place of the rectangle, redimension and convert to RGB or CMYK, acording to the initial data (atach.) When the page is full, create another one.
Neighborhood businesses: The shops and stores in your own community are great places to start selling your raffle tickets. These are locales you frequent, where you know the owners and are able talk to them while you’re there. The more familiar you are to them, the more likely they’ll support your fundraising efforts and will be willing provide a selling spot for you.
Corel DrawLay out as many tickets per page. Number anywhere on the ticket.Number-Pro is also used to print multi form document like invoices.This is a great application to have in a small to medium sized print shop as well. If you or your shop does not have the ability to perforate paper and card stock, it can usually be bought at a local wholesale paper supplier or online like perforatedpaper.comNow raffle ticket numbering is within the capabilities of everyone from the home, do-it-yourselfer, organizations wanting to do fundraising and print shops of all sizes. Number Pro is a true raffle ticket number generator
Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.
After dealing with the numbering problem, you also need to end up with single raffle tickets from the stub. The cutting and perforating bit can be quite a hustle depending on the number of raffle tickets that you are planning to sell. But this is something that can be done by one individual who is dedicated. All one would require is full size paper cutter together with an inexpensive tracing wheel to get over this stumbling block in whole process. You could also choose to enlist a group of people to help you out in this to finish this in a timely manner.
Open a new blank document in Word. Create two raffle ticket designs, one for the person who buys the ticket and one for the organization selling them. Make sure to connect the two tickets, for example by making them in two-cell tables, side-by-side. Include the name of the organization, perhaps the first prize, and any other information you want on the buyer’s ticket. You might, for example, include spaces for the buyer’s name (“Name__________”) and phone number on the organization’s ticket. On both tickets, enter a dummy number for the raffle ticket number as a placeholder.

I am trying to create raffle tickets, 4 on a page with only a number on the stub. My problem is when I get to the print preview and change it to "multiple pages per sheet" it is just changing the number on the next page and not on the next ticket. I followed all the directions on adding the number to each ticket from the merge document (of course all the step by step information I can find is only for 2007 and NOT 2013 so guessing there is something wrong with what I am doing).  When I go into the print screen it is also changing my paper from 8 1/2 x 11 to 11 x 17 and putting 8 on the page.
Having personalized raffle tickets printed can get expensive, especially if you operate a fund-raising operation and must do this often. An alternative to using costly printing services is to use the raffle ticket template. With the raffle ticket template, you save money. The raffle ticket template also gives you complete creative control. Simply by opening a template in Microsoft Word means that can design it yourself by adding both text and images, all from the comfort of your own home.
Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing. The script that Mike referred to worked very well with CS2 and was fairly easy to extend to doing counterfoil numbers as well, but doesn’t seem to work with CS3. I have thrown together a small online script to generate the contents of a data source file to do ticket numbering through the normal CS3 InDesign data merge routine.
CS2 (or earlier) “Cheesy” Numbering There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice. To ensure each number fills its own text frame, select the whole story (Command/Ctrl-A), open the Keep Options (Command/Ctrl-Option/Alt-K) and choose In Next Frame from the Start Paragraph pop-up menu.

I'm not sure about using an open office version of excel would work the same but create a file with your numbers in it starting with 0000 or however many 0's you need then click and hold in corner of cell and drag down, should auto populate. Document must be Saved As "text (tag delimited)" keep clicking ok. Save it this way only when completed somewhere you'll remember. Now go to inDesign and create one ticket. Add a text box and open data merge, navigate to the number file you just created and click/double click (don't remember) and an "options" box will open. This is where you setup your page size, bleeds, etc., I know multiple pages has to be checked. I think you can preview from this too and make necessary adjustments.
I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

Simply copy the second page of the template by highlighting that page and pressing CTRL + C. Windows shortcut keys Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Keyboard shortcuts can save you hours of time. Master the universal Windows keyboard shortcuts, keyboard tricks for specific programs, and a few other tips to speed up your work. Read More are wonderful things. Then create a new blank page by pressing CTRL + Enter. Then paste the copied page using CTRL + V. Create a new blank page, and paste again. Keep doing this until you have the desired number of pages that you will need.

You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.

This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.


The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
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