Your raffle might be subject to gaming commission or tax laws. Check with your municipality, state or province, and federal governments to make sure your raffle is legal. These government departments aren’t just enforcers. They are often great resources on how to run a successful fund raising raffle. Raffles are fun! Getting in trouble with the law or tax man is not.

See to it that there is a place for the show name as well as the movie name. This is a key feature for any movie ticket. It should come out clearly so that the one buying the ticket will clearly see the name of the movie they are going to watch to develop some interest in it. The ticket number should also be brought out clearly but this should not obscure the movie name to enable many to buy the ticket.
Adobe, I expected better! Hi Folks, I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel.

You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.


Open a new blank document in Word. Create two raffle ticket designs, one for the person who buys the ticket and one for the organization selling them. Make sure to connect the two tickets, for example by making them in two-cell tables, side-by-side. Include the name of the organization, perhaps the first prize, and any other information you want on the buyer’s ticket. You might, for example, include spaces for the buyer’s name (“Name__________”) and phone number on the organization’s ticket. On both tickets, enter a dummy number for the raffle ticket number as a placeholder.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author! Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer.:-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed.
The script sets the numbering of multiple gang up tickets so that after cutting the tickets do not need recollating to put back into order (like the CS2 script) but also does counterfoil numbers, prefixes, suffixes, leading zeros and output of pages in reverse order for ‘face up’ printing. The script is. Now I’m feeling rather dumb and frustrated. I just spent the last couple of hour numbering the tickets using keyboard shortcuts to detach the master and substitute numbers. Did 500 tickets this way. Corel crashed repeatedly on my production person today while he was trying to number them using the plug-in. I couldn’t figure out how to make Mike’s script work.
1. On the first hand, you need to initiate Microsoft Publisher. You can view a magnifying glass icon and you need to hit inside the little field which shows Available Templates page. Now you should type the Word ‘tickets’ and move your cursor towards the magnifying glass icon. Hit on it. Subsequently you need to evaluate and assess the ticket options in the Microsoft Publisher. After that you can double click on the desired template. For example if you want to open the raffle ticket template just double click on it for the Publisher to open it for you.
Creating numbered tickets in Word can seem difficult or even impossible if you are not familiar with all the capabilities of the Word program. If you have tried going to the Word template section and have been unsuccessful or frustrated with all the options and questions, there is an easier way. The simplest resolution for creating numbered tickets is to find existing templates that can be edited and adjusted to fit your needs.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
Like a charm! I can choose how many zero how many out I need and if there are special versions I can separate them too! Thank you, I was just about to run screaming from the building! All the “solutions” mentioned on this page are great examples of a great irritation in the graphics industry: When offering solutions, PLEASE mention the platform you are using and save people some frustration; what works great for you on a PC may not work at all on a Mac. What options you see on your version of Indesign are NOT cross-platform and Corel is strictly a Windows application. Thus we get puzzled responses from those who can’t understand why someone cannot grasp what they see as a simple process.

Thank you for these clear instructions. I have had the same problem as Mommy Vaughan and followed the suggestion. However, on re-opening the Word document, I have the dialogue box Invalid Merge Field. I have to use Task Manager to close down Word. I am using Word 2010. Maybe that is part or all of the problem. Any ideas please? I need to sort this by tomorrow night to print them on Monday!
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