I then numbered two rows across 1 -4, then 5 -8. Then I dropped down to A – H in row 260. (I did this to give 1,000+ numbered tickets.) I then used the Excel fill function chosing series and told the program to skip by 4. It filled the rows. I then saved as a tab delimited text file. In InDesign CS4, I set the tickets four up on the master page. On page 1, I positioned my merge fields such that ticket1 was directly above stub1, ticket 2 directly above stub 2, etc.
Whether they're getting ready to win or ready to enter your big event, your guests will love the thrill of entering with our raffle tickets. Each ticket comes with a twin ticket, which means you get to keep one while they keep the other – there's no memorizing of entry numbers with these ticket! Also the number of the ticket remains with your patrons as long as the ticket does! Plus, with the great selection of colors we offer, the ticket isn't going to get lost any time soon.
The exciting thing about our templates is that you are free to customize them, they are easy to download, and you can use them over and over again. These templates will save you time and money and so easy to use, that you can grab yourself a cup of coffee, sit down, relax and create your raffle tickets. Remember you might find other uses for them as well, some may use this sequential numbering system to create price tags for bake sales, and garage sales. Indeed, anything you may require a ‘ticket’ for, you can customize our templates and make them work for you.

We run a big annual event, and have tried these tickets two years in a row. Same major defect for over a year - they put a product sticker on the outside of the roll, and the glue from the sticker seeps into the tickets and glues them together. We have had this happen on several rolls over multiple orders of fresh tickets, and it is not an isolated incident. You end up using about the first third of the roll, and then have to throw the rest away.
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.

Design your ticket, use excel or libre's version and create the numbers. Save those numbers as text, I always make the first one xxx then 001 and so on, xxx will be the master page. Use data merge from Indesign to create the master ticket, you will need to make a text box for the number. Once it looks good to you draw a text box around the whole ticket. At the bottom of the data merge tab is a button that gives you the options how you want your layout, columns or rows, etc. even has a preview. once you click create it will create another file with all your tickets sequentially numbered. It'll be a couple of hours before I'm at work but can post the link I used to create these for the first couple of times.
You need at least one space to make the autonumbering kick in. Now Option/Alt-click on the Autonumbering button in the Control panel (or choose Bullets and Numbering from the Control panel flyout menu) and choose the list you created in the Lists pop-up menu. You might want to adjust the other settings to match this: Now you’re done. Click OK and you should see the number appear in the text frame.

In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.

Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author! Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer.:-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed.


Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author! Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer.:-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed. how to number raffle tickets in word
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