Generating numbered tickets in Microsoft Word document might seem quite challenging and a taxing task if you are a novel user who is not adept in handling Word documents.You might have made numerous attempts in exploring Word templates and might have been fruitless, depressed and annoyed with all the alternatives and problems that you might have come across while trying to comprehend how to create tickets in Word.
After dealing with the numbering problem, you also need to end up with single raffle tickets from the stub. The cutting and perforating bit can be quite a hustle depending on the number of raffle tickets that you are planning to sell. But this is something that can be done by one individual who is dedicated. All one would require is full size paper cutter together with an inexpensive tracing wheel to get over this stumbling block in whole process. You could also choose to enlist a group of people to help you out in this to finish this in a timely manner.
The trick is this: I creat an 'template' of the card, somewhere outside of the page. All object for data are text object, with all the formating needed. In place of the photo is an rectangle. The script read an text file (CSV) with the database, duplicate all template object, one by one and replace string in text object with the string from DB and import photo in place of the rectangle, redimension and convert to RGB or CMYK, acording to the initial data (atach.) When the page is full, create another one.

Layout your ticket in InDesign, one on each page, using the Page Number function to number the tickets. If you have something like Imposer Pro (I know it doesn't work from InDesign CS3) you can, for instance, impose the pages 4up consecutive and get 4 tickets on an A4. Alternatively, make a PDF of the whole document and impose (manually, if you have to), the advantage here is that this can work as a template for other tickets, simply make a new PDF of the same size and update the PDF in the template document every time you have a new raffle ticket to do.

I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Subsequently you have to select the template named Raffle tickets 6 per page. Microsoft Word will make available a preview of the chosen template and then inquires whether you wish to download the particular template. Now choose the option to download. Consequently your current word document gets replaced with the template of raffle ticket which is ready to undergo editing in your hand.
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Create a master frame in ID to hold the number and if I have more than one ticket on a page just link the frames. Apply a paragraph style that starts in a new frame for the numbers. Place the text file with a shift click and the numbers are formatted and the new pages are autoflowed. The number list is very easy to create in Excel with the auto fill feature for that type of thing.
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document.

I'm not sure about using an open office version of excel would work the same but create a file with your numbers in it starting with 0000 or however many 0's you need then click and hold in corner of cell and drag down, should auto populate. Document must be Saved As "text (tag delimited)" keep clicking ok. Save it this way only when completed somewhere you'll remember. Now go to inDesign and create one ticket. Add a text box and open data merge, navigate to the number file you just created and click/double click (don't remember) and an "options" box will open. This is where you setup your page size, bleeds, etc., I know multiple pages has to be checked. I think you can preview from this too and make necessary adjustments.
We run a big annual event, and have tried these tickets two years in a row. Same major defect for over a year - they put a product sticker on the outside of the roll, and the glue from the sticker seeps into the tickets and glues them together. We have had this happen on several rolls over multiple orders of fresh tickets, and it is not an isolated incident. You end up using about the first third of the roll, and then have to throw the rest away.
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.

The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click. how to number raffle tickets in publisher
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