You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.
It was the paper size and multiple pages that was stumping me. However I do have a tip for those wanting a short cut to raffle books of 10. It is a little more fidgety so Im sure someone who is experienced with excel (Im not) but it will make the cutting perfect. Print out in sheets of ten and you just need to staple, cut and perforate...then you have 4-5 ready made raffle books.
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.

Corel crashed repeatedly on my production person today while he was trying to number them using the plug-in. I couldn’t figure out how to make Mike’s script work. It appeared designed for variable numbers in one place. My customer needed her tickets numbered in two places, on the ticket and on the stub. Because she needs them tomorrow there is no time to send them out to be numbered manually. I’ll keep watching this space for more info. Thanks folks.


The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).
@Andy: I’m sorry that I sounded dismissive. That wasn’t my intent. Rather, I was just admitting that I had no idea why someone using CS3 would not see the dialog boxes as they are shown above. If you’re using CS2, they would be significantly different. But the second part of the tip (where I show the numbering dialog boxes) relies on CS3 or later. If you are using CS3 or CS4 and you don’t see that dialog box, feel free to email me at david [at] indesignsecrets [dot] com and send me a screen shot of what you are seeing.
Am I the only individual here who is using CS3, and trying the method described, only to find that my version (5.0.2) for the mac doesn’t have the options anywhere that the author suggests? I have spent the past 2 hours trying to find the same screenshots the author has, only to become reall discouraged. Perhaps he is using a windows version that is setup differently?
The event will set up certain prizes. Raffle tickets are then sold, and the people told to hold them until the raffle is held. Raffle tickets are then drawn randomly, and the holders of the winning tickets get a prize. While organizers can be as creative as they wish, offering bulk purchases of tickets and discounts, the basic rules stay the same. The benefit of holding raffles is that donors enjoy the anticipation of possibly winning a prize, while donating to a charity. This makes raffle tickets one of the most popular ways to earn for a nonprofit.
In trying to produce 300 tickets, I can get all of the first numbered position to be sequential over 100 pages. But, when moving down to the second or third ticket position on the page and setting up the numbering, I repeatedly find that I get a repeat of the first 100 numbers. I am lost as to how to proceed. Is there any other missing step or info that I am assumed to have knowledge about that was not mentioned above? If you know of some other site that might explain this process any better, please post.
Number-Pro makes numbering raffle tickets and forms easy using your desktop publishing software like Indesign, Microsoft Word and Publisher and Corel Draw. Number Pro creates a data merge file based on your numbering requirements that can easily be integrated into the desktop publishing software that allows for printing directly to your small business or home printer.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
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