This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.
Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.
GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.
Getting Word to put a unique number on each raffle ticket is easy enough, but persuading Word to print out several uniquely-numbered raffle tickets per sheet of paper is very hard (I think it is impossible, actually. At least I couldn't figure it out. UPDATE: I did figure it out. Instructions for printing raffle tickets using Microsoft Word are here.). And you don't really want to have every raffle ticket use up a whole sheet of paper.

Our raffle ticket templates have a placeholder for a ticket number, usually “xxx” to remind you it needs to be replaced. Select it, click Insert Merge Field > Ticket. Do the same for the second ticket number placeholder. Most tickets will have two number placeholders because one part of the ticket is for the raffle host (you) and the other is for the purchaser.


Since it’s a group of people who have chosen to raise fund using this means the format of the raffle ticket has to be the one agreed upon by the group. The initial stages will thus be those of trial and error as each person will have his/her own opinion of what should be the format and design of the raffle ticket. This site recognizes that such challenges exist and the raffle ticket templates that we offer you will be in a design and format that most if not all of the people will fall in love with. After a certain format is accepted by everyone you will not have to worry about how to come up with new raffle tickets as these can be used over and over again.
I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count.
There is very simple solution that we use and that is to lay out the sheet say 6 up on a A4 sheet as a master page and in document setup set the number of pages to 1,000 if that is the amount you require. Put a page number on each ticket on the page and although they will all have the same number on each page, we put the the first two letters of the customers business name before each number followed by the letters of the alphabet so it then reads for example BT1A, BT2A, BT3A, BT1B, BT2B, BT2C and so on as each page is printed.
1. On the first hand, you need to initiate Microsoft Publisher. You can view a magnifying glass icon and you need to hit inside the little field which shows Available Templates page. Now you should type the Word ‘tickets’ and move your cursor towards the magnifying glass icon. Hit on it. Subsequently you need to evaluate and assess the ticket options in the Microsoft Publisher. After that you can double click on the desired template. For example if you want to open the raffle ticket template just double click on it for the Publisher to open it for you.
Getting Word to put a unique number on each raffle ticket is easy enough, but persuading Word to print out several uniquely-numbered raffle tickets per sheet of paper is very hard (I think it is impossible, actually. At least I couldn't figure it out. UPDATE: I did figure it out. Instructions for printing raffle tickets using Microsoft Word are here.). And you don't really want to have every raffle ticket use up a whole sheet of paper.
See to it that there is a place for the show name as well as the movie name. This is a key feature for any movie ticket. It should come out clearly so that the one buying the ticket will clearly see the name of the movie they are going to watch to develop some interest in it. The ticket number should also be brought out clearly but this should not obscure the movie name to enable many to buy the ticket.

In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.
The ticket numbering problem seems solved, if awkwardly. But what about linking automatic numbering of text references to a figure (e.g. “see fig.101″) to a legend of that figure (e.g. Fig. 101 shows….”)? Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author!
This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.

I then numbered two rows across 1 -4, then 5 -8. Then I dropped down to A – H in row 260. (I did this to give 1,000+ numbered tickets.) I then used the Excel fill function chosing series and told the program to skip by 4. It filled the rows. I then saved as a tab delimited text file. In InDesign CS4, I set the tickets four up on the master page. On page 1, I positioned my merge fields such that ticket1 was directly above stub1, ticket 2 directly above stub 2, etc.
Good morning! Directions are clear for sure but when i go to merge the first ticket is one but the second number on the raffle ticket is two. i have four raffle tickets per page the first three are messed up but the forth is correct all the way down to 500. Any ideas? i have tried with a header and without a header. i even made the first number with a formula. it does work with out putting next record but like you said it is four tickets with the same number and that would use a ton of ink. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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