If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.

There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
Simply copy the second page of the template by highlighting that page and pressing CTRL + C. Windows shortcut keys Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Keyboard shortcuts can save you hours of time. Master the universal Windows keyboard shortcuts, keyboard tricks for specific programs, and a few other tips to speed up your work. Read More are wonderful things. Then create a new blank page by pressing CTRL + Enter. Then paste the copied page using CTRL + V. Create a new blank page, and paste again. Keep doing this until you have the desired number of pages that you will need.
publishing software and Number-ProCan I use a regular desktop printer for raffle ticket numbering? Absolutely!With desktop publishing software like Adobe InDesign, Microsoft Word, Publisher or any application that allows you to do a "merge" and a stand alone software application like Number-Pro (www.number-pro.com) you can print your own raffle tickets with numbering or any other document you want to be numbered.The ease of using Number-Pro is that it can be used with any software that allows a file merge. This includes but not limited to:Adobe Indesign

Thank you for these instructions!! I'm using them to auto number my son's baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I'm using Word on a PC. Thanks!!
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.

Generating numbered tickets in Microsoft Word document might seem quite challenging and a taxing task if you are a novel user who is not adept in handling Word documents.You might have made numerous attempts in exploring Word templates and might have been fruitless, depressed and annoyed with all the alternatives and problems that you might have come across while trying to comprehend how to create tickets in Word.
The very first step you need to do is to drag your cursor towards the Help icon in the new word document. This icon usually appears in the right part of the top portion of the tool bar listing. It is depicted by a question mark symbol. You have to left click on this menu with your mouse and you need to opt from the type of help listed in the drop-down carte du jour. (Ticket Invitation Templates Download)
Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
I then numbered two rows across 1 -4, then 5 -8. Then I dropped down to A – H in row 260. (I did this to give 1,000+ numbered tickets.) I then used the Excel fill function chosing series and told the program to skip by 4. It filled the rows. I then saved as a tab delimited text file. In InDesign CS4, I set the tickets four up on the master page. On page 1, I positioned my merge fields such that ticket1 was directly above stub1, ticket 2 directly above stub 2, etc.
A raffle refers to a way of generating money by selling numbered tickets, then one or some of the sold tickets are drawn at random and the holder or holders of these tickets get to win a prize. This method of raising cash has been employed by many people especially groups which want to acquire an asset or start a certain project. It is thus not surprising when your child approaches you on how to come up with raffle to help his/her club raise some cash.
Subsequently you have to select the template named Raffle tickets 6 per page. Microsoft Word will make available a preview of the chosen template and then inquires whether you wish to download the particular template. Now choose the option to download. Consequently your current word document gets replaced with the template of raffle ticket which is ready to undergo editing in your hand.
I'm trying to number some custom raffle tickets, 10-up on a 12x18 document. I thought surely there's a way InDesign can do that through a master page or something like that but a good google search isn't really producing any conclusive results. I've seen talks here and there about data merge with a .txt that has the numbers on it but haven't seen much on doing this with tickets that are X-UP on a page. Any help would be great.
Since it’s a group of people who have chosen to raise fund using this means the format of the raffle ticket has to be the one agreed upon by the group. The initial stages will thus be those of trial and error as each person will have his/her own opinion of what should be the format and design of the raffle ticket. This site recognizes that such challenges exist and the raffle ticket templates that we offer you will be in a design and format that most if not all of the people will fall in love with. After a certain format is accepted by everyone you will not have to worry about how to come up with new raffle tickets as these can be used over and over again.
We recently had to print 500 numbered tickets 8 up on 8.5 x 11. When we took it back to Bindery they would have had to hand collate the tickets back in order after the cut. So we came up with a way that when each stack was cut they would simply be stack on top of each other. We couldn’t figure out a way to add 8 sets of grouped numbers to 8-up layout so I had to go into the txt file and number it manually. It worked fine but took a little time. Is there an option to pull 8 different sets of numbers to one page?
Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.

CS2 (or earlier) “Cheesy” Numbering There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice. To ensure each number fills its own text frame, select the whole story (Command/Ctrl-A), open the Keep Options (Command/Ctrl-Option/Alt-K) and choose In Next Frame from the Start Paragraph pop-up menu.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
(Ticket artwork courtesy of. Thanks, Mordy, for pointing out this site!) CS3 List Numbering A significantly more elegant way to handle numbering in InDesign is to use the autonumbering feature in CS3. (CS2 also has an paragraph numbering feature, but it’s not nearly as powerful.) First, create a numbering “list” by choosing Type > Bulleted & Numbered Lists > Define Lists. Then click New to create a new list. You can name it anything you want, but make sure the Continued Numbers across Stories is enabled: After you click OK and close the Define Lists dialog box, create a text frame and type any character (such as a space).
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.

The event will set up certain prizes. Raffle tickets are then sold, and the people told to hold them until the raffle is held. Raffle tickets are then drawn randomly, and the holders of the winning tickets get a prize. While organizers can be as creative as they wish, offering bulk purchases of tickets and discounts, the basic rules stay the same. The benefit of holding raffles is that donors enjoy the anticipation of possibly winning a prize, while donating to a charity. This makes raffle tickets one of the most popular ways to earn for a nonprofit.
I'm not sure about using an open office version of excel would work the same but create a file with your numbers in it starting with 0000 or however many 0's you need then click and hold in corner of cell and drag down, should auto populate. Document must be Saved As "text (tag delimited)" keep clicking ok. Save it this way only when completed somewhere you'll remember. Now go to inDesign and create one ticket. Add a text box and open data merge, navigate to the number file you just created and click/double click (don't remember) and an "options" box will open. This is where you setup your page size, bleeds, etc., I know multiple pages has to be checked. I think you can preview from this too and make necessary adjustments.
Given that Word can support 2,147,483,647 SEQ fields, the whole job could be done in a single document containing 30,000 tickets. On my system, creating such a document took only a few minutes and, once created took about two minutes to update the fields - and that was with about 40,000 pairs of SEQ fields coded as {SEQ Ticket \# 00000} and {SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}. This number formatting is enough to go to 99,999 tickets.
This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.
You saved my life! I work at a School Board with 200+ schools and 100+ departments and I have to number every ticket I make. Football, Baseball, Raffles, Prom, Graduation… the list goes on. The worse part is each is different and has to have x number in this color that color it can be very frustrating. Then to top it off I have the most random number of requested tickets sometimes and it was extremely difficult to find a method that worked and yours did! Like a charm! I can choose how many zero how many out I need and if there are special versions I can separate them too! Thank you, I was just about to run screaming from the building!
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
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