“indesign raffle tickets |raffle tickets numbered consecutively from 101 through”

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Will this work if open the file as a PDF in InDesign? Exactly how would you set up the columning in excel say for numbering 4 part NCR , 1000 sets with prefix text and then what is the link process in Indesign? would appreciate the detailed steps for both

Numbered tickets are a bitch in InDesign. Mainly because if the RIP time. I’ve found that what I have to do is do two runs. One run of just the tickets with the blank area for the numbers. Then I put those back through the copier to print the numbers on them. You want to set up an excel sheet with just one set of your numbers. Not 1, 1, 2, 2. Just 1-3000. Then you create the text boxes for the numbers for the first ticket and draw a text box that is the exact size of the ticket around and send it to the background. Then do a mail merge. You will grab the mail merge name of the column and drop it into each text box so each text box will have the name of your column (like <>). That means that being the same, each number will go into each box so the first ticket will get number 1 and number 1. Then you do the mail merge doing multiple entries per page or whatever it’s called and it will create all the pages needed. So you will end up with a 375 page document to create 3000 total tickets based on an 8 up.

Open your Layers window. If it is not already open, open it by going to (Window > Layers). Rename the layer with the placed pdf ‘Background’ and then create a new layer and name it ‘Numbering’. Lock the ‘Background’ layer. Then select the ‘Numbering’ Layer.

This is a step-by-step tutorial of how to number your raffle tickets. It is also a great way to learn how to use Microsoft Word’s Mail Merge functionality. When you are going through, there are many times when dialog boxes or other pop-ups may occur. Be sure to read on to the next step, as most of the time there will directions on what to do next.

To print tickets with Word, create a table that fills the entire page, create each ticket with text and clip art, then go to “Insert,” click on “Field,” select “Numbering” and then “Sequential” to number each ticket. Create sequential tickets in a Word document with a tutorial from a computer consultant in this free video on computer programs.

4.  Type tool, place insertion cursor in the first text frame on page 1, (remember this frame is on the Master), apply your paragraph style you’ve just created, press and hold Return button as this will apply Paragraph Style and the cursor will jump to next frame.

Then just assign each of the letters to where you want in the layout. You will see <> <> in each of the spots where the letters are. when you do you merge make sure that you have the page as the sheet size that you are using and do not use multiple records per sheet.

i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.

(Advanced) opens the Filter and Sort dialog box, which you can use to filter using multiple criteria. You also can click Filter under Refine recipient list in the Mail Merge Recipients dialog box to open the Filter and Sort dialog box.

TIP: This step inserts a new code at the top of the document, [Pg Num Set: 3001], and numbers the items consecutively from the new starting number by simply changing sequential numbering in word starting “page” number. You can re-use this document In the future with different numbers by simply deleting this code and repeating step 5 with a new starting value. (Or simply double click the code in Reveal Codes to bring up the Values dialog.)

Do you know of any other good raffle ticket templates for Word? Got some tips on making great tickets? How about things you’ve done to boost ticket sales? We’d love to hear about them. Helping people make use of technology to help others is a worthy goal.

1. On the first hand, you need to initiate Microsoft Publisher. You can view a magnifying glass icon and you need to hit inside the little field which shows Available Templates page. Now you should type the Word ‘tickets’ and move your cursor towards the magnifying glass icon. Hit on it. Subsequently you need to evaluate and assess the ticket options in the Microsoft Publisher. After that you can double click on the desired template. For example if you want to open the raffle ticket template just double click on it for the Publisher to open it for you.

It is always good to answer any questions that you anticipate on the movie ticket. This will save you the stress of having to answer this questions at the time of purchase of the ticket from the movie lovers before they get a ticket.

2. Edit the Template to meet your needs. To replace a template graphic with your own, click the graphic to select it, then hit the ‘Delete’ key. The template graphic disappears. Go to the ‘Insert’ menu, select the picture or clip art command, then browse to the image you want to place on your ticket. Click the image to add it to your raffle ticket.

There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.

It’s pretty easy in Excel. Take your number of tickets you’ll get on a sheet, divide 20000 by that number. That will be your number of rows. Type a 1 in the A1 cell location, type =(A1+1) in the A2 cell location. Paste that in as many rows as you determined. Copy the last cell in your first column. Paste that in cell B1. Copy B1 and paste in as many rows as you had in Column A. Copy column B and paste in column C. Copy C and paste in Column D. Repeat as many times as you have tickets on a sheet until you have enough columns as you do tickets on a sheet. Save as Tab deliminated text and bring into data merge on an imposed sheet. Data merge should be able to build you a document easily with as many sheets as you need and on a 1 knife trimmer you should have neatly stacked tickets in order.

When you have multiple tickets per page, you need to use a different numbering scheme. This link show how to use a merge with an Excel spreadsheet to create incrementing numbers: Publisher Auto-number Tickets Here’s another page on the same topic: Numbered Tickets in Publisher

Chuck, It does look as though using data merge is the best way, but rather than generating the numbers in Excel here is an improved number generator script to create indesign number and counterfoil numbering data merge files. We recently had to print 500 numbered tickets 8 up on 8.5 x 11. When we took it back to Bindery they would have had to hand collate the tickets back in order after the cut.

4. Save your raffle tickets, then purchase the appropriate size raffle ticket card stock from an office supply store. The item numbers for Avery brand are listed with the raffle ticket template, but any brand matching the size of your raffle ticket will do.

This is about the 4th time I’ve ordered ticket from you and each time I’ve been impressed with the quality and rapid turn around. But we still seem to have problems with the size of the logo on the back; would like it to be larger than the finished product. Maybe we can get it next year!

Measure out your tickets. If you are keeping your raffle fairly small (>50 people), it is just as easy to write up the tickets all by hand. Take a ruler and cut them out in rows and columns so that you have a bunch of tickets of the same size. If you’re making enough tickets in the raffle to be worth several pages of paper, you might try measuring them out and cutting them all at once. However, this time-saving technique shouldn’t be tried unless you know you’ve gotten your measurements down perfectly.

If you need leading zeros then just format the column as text. The ticket numbering problem seems solved, if awkwardly. But what about linking automatic numbering of text references to a figure (e.g. “see fig.101″) to a legend of that figure (e.g. 101 shows.”)?

Open a new blank document in Word. Create two raffle ticket designs, one for the person who buys the ticket and one for the organization selling them. Make sure to connect the two tickets, for example by making them in two-cell tables, side-by-side. Include the name of the organization, perhaps the first prize, and any other information you want on the buyer’s ticket. You might, for example, include spaces for the buyer’s name (“Name__________”) and phone number on the organization’s ticket. On both tickets, enter a dummy number for the raffle ticket number as a placeholder.

To make more numbers, just duplicate this frame. Every time you make a new frame, InDesign increments the number automatically. Note that in the following image, the frames are not threaded together: Master Pages You may be tempted to place this number on a master page.

ADVICE FROM LICENSING OFFICE: As long as your prizes are in sealed containers a TEN would not be required, however you may need a TEN for other attractions at your event or if your event itself is considered ‘regulated entertainment’. If someone who appears to be under 18 wins an alcoholic prize, checks should be made to verify their age and good practice is to withhold the prize until it can be given to someone of 18 or over.

Keep your raffle design distinctive and consistent. Although smaller-sized raffles don’t usually run the risk of ticket fraud, it still helps to give your tickets a special touch for legitimacy’s sake. Something like a drawing specific to the type of raffle you’re putting on, or a quick signature can make the tickets feel more worth the money. [3] It’s a small detail, but buyers will appreciate the effort you put into each of them.

Thank you so much for this! These instructions were perfect and clear, and I got it all done, except when I go to print. It prints out 1 per page. I have Word 2007, and tried printing out on letter size with 4 per page, but then it prints them all very tiny in the corners. Can you help me? Thanks 🙂

Stapling and Padding: The charge for stapling in increments of 5,10,15,20 or 25 is $.06 per book. The charge for stapling into books of any other increment is $.09 per book. (Padding the raffle tickets is cheaper than stapling and makes it easy for you to divide into small groups.) * We’ve created a quick video to explain the difference between stapling and padding – have a look: Stapling and padding

One Reply to ““indesign raffle tickets |raffle tickets numbered consecutively from 101 through””

  1.  – Include any legal wording your local regulations require (in the UK, you’ll probably need a license from your local council, and include details of that on the raffle ticket. More about that here.)

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