Is this quite beyond InDesign CS3? If it is solvable the solution isn’t mentioned in any CS3 book I have managed to get hold of, nor is it dealt with in the CS3 Help facility as far as I can see, nor were the speakers at a recent Adove CS3 Workshop able to solve it. Please advise this frustrated book author! Being the printer, I can’t say I pass the job on to the printer.:-) We do it using auto page numbering, export it as one big pdf, and then use our imposition program to lay the file up multiple times on a page. A lot of jobs we do leave the number blank, and use the numbering machine later, but we’re getting more and more jobs that are run on digital presses like the Docucolor 250 and have numbers too small for the numberer, so we have to do them in the file. This works fine for single-sided jobs, but when a job numbers on one side, but not the other, it gets tricky, especially if it’s NCR, which has to be duplexed.
Numbered tickets are a bitch in InDesign. Mainly because if the RIP time. I've found that what I have to do is do two runs. One run of just the tickets with the blank area for the numbers. Then I put those back through the copier to print the numbers on them. You want to set up an excel sheet with just one set of your numbers. Not 1, 1, 2, 2. Just 1-3000. Then you create the text boxes for the numbers for the first ticket and draw a text box that is the exact size of the ticket around and send it to the background. Then do a mail merge. You will grab the mail merge name of the column and drop it into each text box so each text box will have the name of your column (like <>). That means that being the same, each number will go into each box so the first ticket will get number 1 and number 1. Then you do the mail merge doing multiple entries per page or whatever it's called and it will create all the pages needed. So you will end up with a 375 page document to create 3000 total tickets based on an 8 up.

Chuck, It does look as though using data merge is the best way, but rather than generating the numbers in Excel here is an improved number generator script to create indesign number and counterfoil numbering data merge files. We recently had to print 500 numbered tickets 8 up on 8.5 x 11. When we took it back to Bindery they would have had to hand collate the tickets back in order after the cut.
This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.
Number-Pro makes numbering raffle tickets and forms easy using your desktop publishing software like Indesign, Microsoft Word and Publisher and Corel Draw. Number Pro creates a data merge file based on your numbering requirements that can easily be integrated into the desktop publishing software that allows for printing directly to your small business or home printer.
In trying to produce 300 tickets, I can get all of the first numbered position to be sequential over 100 pages. But, when moving down to the second or third ticket position on the page and setting up the numbering, I repeatedly find that I get a repeat of the first 100 numbers. I am lost as to how to proceed. Is there any other missing step or info that I am assumed to have knowledge about that was not mentioned above? If you know of some other site that might explain this process any better, please post.
I to, have read through your directions while using both mac & pc platforms. I fail to find the “standard features” screen shots that you show above in either program. I too have spent several hours trying to get the sequential 3-up numbering as described. In trying to produce 300 tickets, I can get all of the first numbered position to be sequential over 100 pages. But, when moving down to the second or third ticket position on the page and setting up the numbering, I repeatedly find that I get a repeat of the first 100 numbers. I am lost as to how to proceed. Is there any other missing step or info that I am assumed to have knowledge about that was not mentioned above? If you know of some other site that might explain this process any better, please post. Thanks for your help.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
I have done this twice now, getting flustered. The ticket part the person keeps has the correct sequential number on it, but the side that we keep has the same number on it for the whole page. What part am I missing, at first I did not uncheck the box, but this time I did but have the same number on the stub side that we keep with the person's name, etc
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.
Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
Open a new blank document in Word. Create two raffle ticket designs, one for the person who buys the ticket and one for the organization selling them. Make sure to connect the two tickets, for example by making them in two-cell tables, side-by-side. Include the name of the organization, perhaps the first prize, and any other information you want on the buyer’s ticket. You might, for example, include spaces for the buyer’s name (“Name__________”) and phone number on the organization’s ticket. On both tickets, enter a dummy number for the raffle ticket number as a placeholder.
Hi - are you creating your own tickets using the instructions on this page? If so, you can of course change the font and everything else in your Word document. If you are using the Raffle Ticket Creator app (app.raffleticketcreator.com) then you can't change the font size ... you'll just need to tinker with the exact words that you are including in order to get them to fit on the page. Hope that helps!
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