I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks.
Canva’s drag and drop design features makes it easy to add your organization’s brand assets like logos and colors easily. Simply go to the uploads pane and choose a JPEG, PNG or SVG version of your logo to add to your design. Drag your logo to where it needs to be and resize by clicking or dragging on its edges. Change the template color scheme to your brand palette by clicking the color tool on the Canva toolbar. Pick the correct hue from the color wheel or input your color hexcode into the box.
I've also been using NumberPress for about a year and it is awesome. You can easily position numbers as many up per form and as many up on a sheet as you will ever need. Easily change font, color, point size, angle, number of digits and can even customize prefix-ex: instead of No. you can print ABC or a form number. It also does variable data (I've only used a couple of times).Took a little while to learn but is now a piece of cake.
So we came up with a way that when each stack was cut they would simply be stack on top of each other. We couldn’t figure out a way to add 8 sets of grouped numbers to 8-up layout so I had to go into the txt file and number it manually. It worked fine but took a little time. Is there an option to pull 8 different sets of numbers to one page? You saved my life! I work at a School Board with 200+ schools and 100+ departments and I have to number every ticket I make.
Numbered tickets are a bitch in InDesign. Mainly because if the RIP time. I've found that what I have to do is do two runs. One run of just the tickets with the blank area for the numbers. Then I put those back through the copier to print the numbers on them. You want to set up an excel sheet with just one set of your numbers. Not 1, 1, 2, 2. Just 1-3000. Then you create the text boxes for the numbers for the first ticket and draw a text box that is the exact size of the ticket around and send it to the background. Then do a mail merge. You will grab the mail merge name of the column and drop it into each text box so each text box will have the name of your column (like <>). That means that being the same, each number will go into each box so the first ticket will get number 1 and number 1. Then you do the mail merge doing multiple entries per page or whatever it's called and it will create all the pages needed. So you will end up with a 375 page document to create 3000 total tickets based on an 8 up.
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
The event will set up certain prizes. Raffle tickets are then sold, and the people told to hold them until the raffle is held. Raffle tickets are then drawn randomly, and the holders of the winning tickets get a prize. While organizers can be as creative as they wish, offering bulk purchases of tickets and discounts, the basic rules stay the same. The benefit of holding raffles is that donors enjoy the anticipation of possibly winning a prize, while donating to a charity. This makes raffle tickets one of the most popular ways to earn for a nonprofit.

The very first step you need to do is to drag your cursor towards the Help icon in the new word document. This icon usually appears in the right part of the top portion of the tool bar listing. It is depicted by a question mark symbol. You have to left click on this menu with your mouse and you need to opt from the type of help listed in the drop-down carte du jour. (Ticket Invitation Templates Download)
Microsoft Publisher offers many design tools that let you create any type of publication or document. You can essentially make anything in Publisher, including tickets. The easiest way to make tickets in Microsoft Publisher is to download a ticket template from Microsoft Office's website and modify it in Publisher with your own text, colors and graphics. These steps can be used for creating tickets in both Microsoft Publisher 2003 and 2007.
Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document.

So we came up with a way that when each stack was cut they would simply be stack on top of each other. We couldn’t figure out a way to add 8 sets of grouped numbers to 8-up layout so I had to go into the txt file and number it manually. It worked fine but took a little time. Is there an option to pull 8 different sets of numbers to one page? You saved my life! I work at a School Board with 200+ schools and 100+ departments and I have to number every ticket I make.

It was the paper size and multiple pages that was stumping me. However I do have a tip for those wanting a short cut to raffle books of 10. It is a little more fidgety so Im sure someone who is experienced with excel (Im not) but it will make the cutting perfect. Print out in sheets of ten and you just need to staple, cut and perforate...then you have 4-5 ready made raffle books.

Since it’s a group of people who have chosen to raise fund using this means the format of the raffle ticket has to be the one agreed upon by the group. The initial stages will thus be those of trial and error as each person will have his/her own opinion of what should be the format and design of the raffle ticket. This site recognizes that such challenges exist and the raffle ticket templates that we offer you will be in a design and format that most if not all of the people will fall in love with. After a certain format is accepted by everyone you will not have to worry about how to come up with new raffle tickets as these can be used over and over again.


With all of the many available templates, how do you select the right ticket design? It’s a good idea to choose a design featuring a background image that in some way fits with your fundraising purpose. This ties your efforts together in a cohesive way, making your tickets more attractive to buyers. A good design gives potential buyers an idea into the type of cause they’re supporting right off the bat.
But it’s not hard to duplicate and reduplicate until you have a thousand or more numbered tickets. I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count. I handle this much differently. I create a number list in Excel and save as a txt file.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)
×