Numbered tickets are a bitch in InDesign. Mainly because if the RIP time. I've found that what I have to do is do two runs. One run of just the tickets with the blank area for the numbers. Then I put those back through the copier to print the numbers on them. You want to set up an excel sheet with just one set of your numbers. Not 1, 1, 2, 2. Just 1-3000. Then you create the text boxes for the numbers for the first ticket and draw a text box that is the exact size of the ticket around and send it to the background. Then do a mail merge. You will grab the mail merge name of the column and drop it into each text box so each text box will have the name of your column (like <>). That means that being the same, each number will go into each box so the first ticket will get number 1 and number 1. Then you do the mail merge doing multiple entries per page or whatever it's called and it will create all the pages needed. So you will end up with a 375 page document to create 3000 total tickets based on an 8 up.
Pink order (#2) - Ordered these again, even though I wasn't impressed with the first round because they were cheap and they serve the purpose we needed for work. But this time we ordered pink and the new set is beautiful! Lines on back for address/name/phone# seems original order isn't from the same printing company maybe? Nothing stamped made in USA on blue set or Indiana ticket Co. This order has both. The punch outs are not on this roll at all, which is perfectly rolled up, no folded rows. So we're not using the rest of the blue order that we had and instead going forward with these.

I also use InDesign. An Excel file for numbering is easy to create. Then find DataMerge under Automate to link the data file. When you are ready to export, use the create PDF right on the Datamerge window. You can print as cut / stack on the Fiery (or CREO). REMEMBER - if your customer wants them stapled into books of 6 (for example) each stack has to be divisible by 6 if you are going to staple then cut into individual books.
data merge can be a little tricky for this. Try making a single ticket at the top of your page (not on the master page). Put your merge fields into this ticket. Then when using data merge click the option to put more then one per a page, preview and see if this does what you want it to do. Granted if you have double sided printing, data merge gets very tricky, but can be done.
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
This 2,000 count ticket roll is consecutively numbered twice on each ticket. The back of the stub that says "TICKET" has a printed area for "name", "address" and "phone number". Each double ticket measures 2 inches long and 2 inch wide. Double stub tickets are typically used when the customer will keep one half of the ticket and drop the other ticket for collection. The tickets are printed on thick card stock to ensure a clean tear along the perforation. These tickets are great for carnivals, bingo, little leagues, softball games, conventions, shows, banquets, class reunions, golf outings or anywhere else your organization might need to use. Each single ticket measures 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.
But it’s not hard to duplicate and reduplicate until you have a thousand or more numbered tickets. I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count. I handle this much differently. I create a number list in Excel and save as a txt file.
You need at least one space to make the autonumbering kick in. Now Option/Alt-click on the Autonumbering button in the Control panel (or choose Bullets and Numbering from the Control panel flyout menu) and choose the list you created in the Lists pop-up menu. You might want to adjust the other settings to match this: Now you’re done. Click OK and you should see the number appear in the text frame.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
I usually do my numbering in excel and save it as a tab delimited text file. I would put the starting number in A1 and insert a formula in A2 that is basically A1+1. Then I grab the lower right corner of that cell and while holding cmd (on Mac), I drag the cell down to A10 (or whatever number of pages you will be printing). This would auto populate the cells and change the formula to basically add 1 to the previous cell. Now go in B1 and insert a formula that adds 10 to A1 (or whatever number of pages you will be printing). In this example, the value should be 11. Then drag this cell to repeat the formula right to have the number of up you will have. The select A2 trough A10 and drag them the same way to populate the remaining cells. Save your excel file for future reference and save as tab delimited text. Open the file in textedit, find every tab and replace all with a paragraph change. Then import the file in investing in linked text boxes over your imposition.
Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document.

Your neighborhood businesses. These people are normally eager to participate in such activities and approaching them will not be in vain as this is a good venue for selling many raffle tickets. Exercise caution when dealing with high traffic business as they are likely not be responsible for the tickets and the money due to the nature of their businesses. It will be prudent to have one member of the group checking by every day to collect the money.
You don’t have to be a born salesperson to move all your tickets, but the better your sales tactics, the more successful you’ll probably be. Peter Kajanzy teaches how to crush a sale with pro techniques. One bit of advice he offers: When people ask for the price, instead of doing a complex breakdown of one for $2, three for $5, and so on, go straight to “You can buy five tickets for $8.”
Below, we have a small and easy to follow tutorial on how to create sequentially numbered raffle tickets using Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel. Simply choose one of our 30 raffle ticket templates and download it to your computer. Next, begin the following tutorial. This tutorial will take you through the process of using Excel to create the numbering sequence, which you will then save, and import into Microsoft Word.
12. To build the document, you will add the first merge field, the room number. To do this, choose Room from the Field list box, and click Insert Print Merge Field. This will place the variable on the document. Next, choose Subject from the Field list box, and click Insert Print Merge Field once more. Now both variables are inserted in the CorelDRAW document.
I’m quite inclined to let the printer add the numbers. Less file size for me, less plates for me. I recently sent an invite to a digital printers, I offered to lay it up with all the names, they rejected the idea and said they could merge the names in as it printed. I guess it’s down to what you’re going to use it for. But if you’re going to print them yourself then by all means, if it’s going to a printer, best to check with them before you send anything definite over.
Good morning! Directions are clear for sure but when i go to merge the first ticket is one but the second number on the raffle ticket is two. i have four raffle tickets per page the first three are messed up but the forth is correct all the way down to 500. Any ideas? i have tried with a header and without a header. i even made the first number with a formula. it does work with out putting next record but like you said it is four tickets with the same number and that would use a ton of ink. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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