I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks....
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
A raffle refers to a way of generating money by selling numbered tickets, then one or some of the sold tickets are drawn at random and the holder or holders of these tickets get to win a prize. This method of raising cash has been employed by many people especially groups which want to acquire an asset or start a certain project. It is thus not surprising when your child approaches you on how to come up with raffle to help his/her club raise some cash.
But it’s not hard to duplicate and reduplicate until you have a thousand or more numbered tickets. I think the conclusion of all these Rube Goldberg approaches is that InDesign still isn’t ready for handling what is really a head-smacking-stupid-simple kind of numbering job — the kind of jobs computers were created for in the first place. My DOS word processor XyWrite — from AD 1987! — could do numbering stuff like this in no time and with no trouble. Quite ridiculous, really, when you consider the staggering graphics and typography capabilities inside InDesign — but the poor thing cannot really count. I handle this much differently. I create a number list in Excel and save as a txt file.

You need to create a list of numbers using some method (maybe even through VBA) as a text file, database or other data source, then just insert merge field in the document and use Print Merge to generate multiple labels with different numbers in it. (just need to give it enough space to fit the longest string along as many lines as you think there could be) If I reserve space for 50 chars and the major strings are 25 chars, the result is not professional looking. My solution for all print merge for ID cards (and similarities, incl. Auto numbering) is to merging data BEFORE printing, in an CDR file with all pages. So, I check all the cards and I correct only on text object how need. I found an software with this capabilities, but 300 USD is excesive (not only for Est Europe) for one only week of working (yes, his UI is better than my). I found an software with this capabilities, but 300 USD is excesive (not only for Est Europe) for one only week of working (yes, his UI is better than my) And my script use photo also.


My script looks for the object-name and replaces all the numbers at the end of the text-string. Example: TEST010111 start: 9 how long is the number-string? 5 > TEST00009,TEST00010 and so on every marked object with the specified objectname will get the new string. I have another script that places the marked object(s) in a user-sized sheet after editing the quantity X and Y and the space between the objects.
I’d like to share my solution. It came to me partially in my sleep, I tried refining it this morning but because of time, finally had my production person print the manually numbered tickets so that we could deliver them to the customer who needed them today. Here is my solution. I deduced that it would be better to let a program designed to count, do the counting. I used Excel. I then let InDesign CS4 do the merging. Here’s the formula.
It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.
Go to the Avery label center website and type "Raffle Ticket" in the search box. Review the raffle ticket results. Select a template that uses eight raffle tickets per page. Select the template that uses the program you will use to edit the template. For example, if you are using Photoshop, select this type of template. Notice that Avery templates utilize the business card templates since its raffle tickets are the same dimensions.
You need to create a list of numbers using some method (maybe even through VBA) as a text file, database or other data source, then just insert merge field in the document and use Print Merge to generate multiple labels with different numbers in it. (just need to give it enough space to fit the longest string along as many lines as you think there could be) If I reserve space for 50 chars and the major strings are 25 chars, the result is not professional looking. My solution for all print merge for ID cards (and similarities, incl. Auto numbering) is to merging data BEFORE printing, in an CDR file with all pages. So, I check all the cards and I correct only on text object how need. I found an software with this capabilities, but 300 USD is excesive (not only for Est Europe) for one only week of working (yes, his UI is better than my). I found an software with this capabilities, but 300 USD is excesive (not only for Est Europe) for one only week of working (yes, his UI is better than my) And my script use photo also.
If the second number on your raffle ticket is one higher than the first number, you must have accidentally put the <> tag after the first number (causing the next number, on the same ticket, to increase by one). You only need the <> after the second number on each ticket, so the next ticket gets a new number. (But you don't need it on the final ticket on the **page**, because the next **page** automatically gets a new number)

Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.


Number-Pro makes numbering raffle tickets and forms easy using your desktop publishing software like Indesign, Microsoft Word and Publisher and Corel Draw. Number Pro creates a data merge file based on your numbering requirements that can easily be integrated into the desktop publishing software that allows for printing directly to your small business or home printer.
• On the document page, override the items by Command/Ctrl-Shift-dragging over them (or clicking on them). • Select that one page and duplicate it in the Pages panel, or by choosing Layout > Pages > Duplicate Spread. • Select the original page and the duplicate and then copy those. Repeat this (select pages and duplicate) until you have enough pages. Unfortunately, InDesign isn’t exactly speedy at updating these numbers when you add a bunch of pages.
I answer readers' questions about Microsoft Office when I can, but there's no guarantee. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise, nor do I ask for a fee from readers. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
I am getting my tickets to number on one side of it. However, I am needing my tickets to have the number on each side, but one side will not number. I have tried several times and it will not number on both sides. I am using an avery template that is printing 10 tickets per page, stub and tearable ticket. But the stub will not number while the tearable ticket will.
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