Event Programs are the perfect way to keep things running smoothly. You can use them to provide schedules, descriptions, maps, and a catalog of other details that your guests will need, in a handy booklet format they can carry around with them all day. They're a great way to communicate the organization of your event with introductions, steps, and duration of activities.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)

We'd like to think they're both great! The smooth finish is a matte finish while the semi-gloss finish has more shine, so colors tend to stand out more with the semi-gloss finish. Other than that, both papers are a heavy weight quality ticket stock that make your tickets look professional, about the same weight as an expensive business card or greeting card.
It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.

You use InDesign or Illustrator and things like variables to increment numbers. Doesn't matter in your case, though. If you really are going to print it with an online service, you will just create a PDF with 300 separate pages/ artboards and could just as well hack in the numbers manualyl or use something liek automatic page numbering to increment them.

Vinyl Stickers are waterproof and printed with UV stable ink, so you can stick them in windows or outside with the knowledge that they'll last a long time, with no fear of damage caused by sun or rain! They come in 4 shapes: square, rectangle, circle, and oval, with a "kiss" or die cut: the top layer is cut but not the adhesive backing. Choose Vinyl Stickers if you need your Stickers to hang around in inclement weather, providing advertising over a long period of time.
If you've saved it (in a standard file format) we can probably print it! PDF, JPG, GIF, TIF, EPS, INDD, or AI files will all work. Just make sure that your files are saved at 300 DPI (dots per square inch) at 100% print size. This will ensure high quality production. You can email image files to support@ticketprinting.com, or you can use our My Files feature (found in your account online) to upload your files directly to our design team.

Below, we have a small and easy to follow tutorial on how to create sequentially numbered raffle tickets using Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel. Simply choose one of our 30 raffle ticket templates and download it to your computer. Next, begin the following tutorial. This tutorial will take you through the process of using Excel to create the numbering sequence, which you will then save, and import into Microsoft Word.


i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used. event ticket numbering
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