Start with images at 300 dpi resolution at print size in any of the following file formats: JPEG, TIFF, or EPS. To design your own ticket, recommended file types are TIFF, JPG, AI (Illustrator), or PSD (Photoshop) with a high resolution (300 dpi). You may also want to let us know what fonts you are using. Please view our specifications page for more information.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Hello Bruce, I seem to be having a different problem altogether. I created my ticket in word using logos and text boxes as needed, ticket looks great. I followed your very clear instructions but when I did the Finish & Merge I got this message, "You cannot include DATA, NEXT, NEXTIF, or SKIPIF fields in comments, headers, footers, footnotes or endnotes." I then click on OK and get this, "A field calculation error occurred in record 1. Bruce any help would be much appreciated. Thank you!!

You’ll need to decide on a selling price. You don’t want to price them too high so that many people would find it too expensive. The lower the price of each ticket, the more tickets you’ll sell. If you price your tickets at $1 each, expect each buyer to purchase from one to five tickets. If your tickets are $5-10 each, each buyer will likely purchase no more that two.

It's all about the features. The first price quote you saw was based on the least expensive options: colored paper with no frills. If you choose white paper, which is heavier than colored paper, it will cost more. Select colored paper and the price will return to the original quote. Adding stapling or your own image to the back of the template will also change the price of the order.
If your sales team is on the go, they might appreciate having items stapled into convenient booklets, which can make them easier to distribute. If you choose stapling, we will staple your tickets together in booklets of up to 10 items. Stapling costs a bit extra: to see how much please select the stapling option and choose the number of items per booklet. The price in the lower right hand corner will adjust accordingly.
I've described ticket numbering using number lists generated as text files with Data Merge and as ordinary File > Place operations any number of times now. Both of those methods would require only a single list file to add as many instances of the number as you like on each ticket. For Dat merge you add the placeholders in each positon. For an ordinary Place operation you palce the file multiple times into independently threaded frame strings.
Below, we have a small and easy to follow tutorial on how to create sequentially numbered raffle tickets using Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel. Simply choose one of our 30 raffle ticket templates and download it to your computer. Next, begin the following tutorial. This tutorial will take you through the process of using Excel to create the numbering sequence, which you will then save, and import into Microsoft Word.
Our Design Your Own barcodes use code 93; you will need a device that reads to that standard to scan them. You'll also want to make sure that you don't stretch or distort the barcode while you design the rest of your ticket. If you resize it, make sure it stays proportional, or it won't scan. Make sure the area behind the barcode is white, with nothing else printed there. If there is color or text behind the barcode, it won't scan either.
Creating numbered tickets in Word can seem difficult or even impossible if you are not familiar with all the capabilities of the Word program. If you have tried going to the Word template section and have been unsuccessful or frustrated with all the options and questions, there is an easier way. The simplest resolution for creating numbered tickets is to find existing templates that can be edited and adjusted to fit your needs.
We'd like to think they're both great! The smooth finish is a matte finish while the semi-gloss finish has more shine, so colors tend to stand out more with the semi-gloss finish. Other than that, both papers are a heavy weight quality ticket stock that make your tickets look professional, about the same weight as an expensive business card or greeting card.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
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