Using Emoji fonts, you can include various colorful and graphical characters, such as smileys, flags, street signs, animals, people, food, and landmarks in your documents. Of course, you can’t just type an emoji inside InDesign, so to insert them, you can copy and paste them from another program, or double-click them inside the Glyphs panel (Type > Glyphs).
As a final note, I also use this feature for my bibliography, which has about 230 references right now. (Thank goodness they finally added the capability to put text before the automatic number. InDesign CS2 is incapable of rendering an automatic list of bracketed numbers.) Anyway, the cross-referencing works great, but I run into the same problem that Dolati mentioned about having to manually change “Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4” to “Figs 2-3 and 2-4.” Changing the linked text does cause problems when you update the cross references. So, I set up a character style (invisible) that changes the text to white and changes the tracking so that the text doesn’t take up any horizontal space. That way, when I have a set of references like [5][6][7][12], I type [5-7,12] next to the references and apply the invisible character style to the linked references. Then, I don’t have to worry about the linked text giving me a warning that it needs to be updated. Also if the reference numbers change, I can (1) change the invisible character style so that I can see the text, (2) update the typed reference, and (3) put the invisible character style back how it was. This solution is far from ideal, but it works.
      Now I know this is a big change for Corel. Traditionally, they have been opposed to policing how many times you installed the program on x number of computers. They seemed to be more concerned with the number of users than how many paid licenses they had. I can remember that for years you could buy the upgrade version and install it as a full version without ever needing to show a previous version as your proof of ownership. In all my years of buying software, I had never seen this before CorelDRAW. Well I guess Corel, like everyone else, is trying to clamp down and control who is using the program. Because of this, I am sure there are a number of users out there who will now probably take a closer look at whether or not they will upgrade.
Yes, it is also possible to manually change a color (Edit > Find and Replace > Replace Objects > Replace a Color...), but it is necessary to change every color and every shade of this color for each page. The Color Styles docker will replace the color and all shades on all pages in just one step. But it is important to remember that it is necessary to "apply" the Color Style to the object, since it is not enough to be "Yellow" or the same color (e.g. Pantone 012), the Color Style must be applied. When you change the Color Style, only the objects using that style will change, not all yellow objects.
Warning  Making even minor changes to an outline numbering scheme won't necessarily change the initial position you've selected in the gallery, but rather may create a new gallery position, overwriting an existing one. Because of this problem, attaching numbering to styles is strongly recommended. This is covered in greater detail later in this chapter and in the chapter on Styles.
Publication design shouldn’t have to be complicated and if you use Microsoft Publisher, it won’t be. The software has a great drag and drop feature that allows you to quickly insert photos and other media into your publications. The drag and drop feature will save you no end of time. You can even drop content directly from your social media pages into your document!
Overall: I started learning graphic design on Corel way back when... and then I switched to Adobe and learned the ins and outs of that. Then eventually got a job that was already using Corel so I went back to it. They are very similar... I like them both in terms of Draw vs Illustrator... but Photo Paint vs Photoshop, well, Photoshop will beat them there. With that said, I can still make Photo Paint do what I want so it works.
23 Feb 2010[23] X5 (15) 7 to X5 7 to X5 XP, Vista, 7, 8 Built-in content organizer (CorelConnect), CD, web graphics and animation tools, multi-core performance improvement, digital content (professional fonts, clip arts, and photos), object hinting, pixel view, enhanced Mesh tool with transparency options, added touch support, and new supported file formats.[24] It has developed Transformation, which makes multiple copies of a single object.
the tools are much better than the competition, it is easier to vectorize and edit vectors. when exporting I think it has the most extensive file support, plus I can even open Illustrator files (which I can not do vice versa) the cleaping mask option is better than another, I can edit even the bitmap colors a lot easier without worrying about damaging the original file
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Second (and more interesting) is that you can apply text formatting to text frames you’ve selected using the Selection tool or the Direct Selection tool. When you do this, InDesign applies the formatting to all of the text in the text frame, including any overset text. InDesign won’t let you use this method to apply formatting to text frames that are linked to other text frames. Tired of using the Type tool to select and format every photo caption on a page? Use the Selection tool to select them all and apply your formatting—it’s easier, and it’s quicker (see Figure 4-1).
Roger Wambolt, senior product trainer at Corel, eases in with an exploration of the interface and touches on the major players in the toolbox: the Pick, Shape, Crop, Curve, and Interactive tools. Then, once you know how to draw simple lines and shapes, he shows how to group, copy, and adjust objects on your document page. Plus, learn about working with text, using the new Font Manager and the extensive library of fonts in CorelDRAW, adding and editing images, automating tasks with scripts and macros, creating color palettes, and preparing your CorelDRAW projects for print. Roger closes with some tips on customizing the CorelDRAW interface to be more productive and create your designs in fewer steps.
Microsoft Publisher’s templates make publication design easy. If you need to create a quick publication with minimal effort, you can simply use one of Microsoft Publisher’s many templates. There are hundreds of easy-to-use templates to choose from, which are designed to simplify the layout and make creating your ideal publication quick and easy. If you can’t find the template you’re looking for, simply go online and you’re bound to find one you can download for free!

If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.

One of the harder things to do in Adobe InDesign, surprisingly for a page layout tool, is to create multilevel or outline format numbered lists.  The right way to accomplish this, according to the folks at Adobe, is to create a Style for every level of the list you’d like to have! Here are Adobe’s instructions on how to do so (This content is taken directly from https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/bullets-numbering.html#create_multi_level_lists):
There are many reasons why you might want to adjust the size of a layout, but the three most common adjustments are to page size, margins, or amount of bleed. It’s extremely easy to change any of these in InDesign, but changing them and altering your text frames and other page elements has long been a huge hassle. The new Adjust Layout feature in InDesign CC 2019 comes to the rescue.
Whatever the design, many times your client will ask for an alternate color scheme or additional options for fonts and text attributes. In other cases, you may want more options for your design. Spending time creating these options manually can add hours and additional costs to your project. Instead, why not use “Styles” in CorelDRAW? In this webinar, Anand Dixit, CorelDRAW Master, graphic designer and trainer will show you how to create options for your designs in minutes, including:

Use "Format Page Numbers" for specific changes, like types of numbers and chapter headings. If you want to go the extra mile, double-click on the header or footer once again. Click "Page Numbers," then click "Format Page Numbers" under the menu that appears. From here, you can set different types of numbers, like Roman numerals or letters, as well as customize the basic appearance of numbers. It is not incredibly robust, but it works.
By default, every time you open an InDesign document, the links to graphics and text files are checked. If anything is amiss, you get an alert rather than an open document. This seems slow to me, especially because I often open documents only to edit them. In many cases, I don’t even have the graphic files, so of course they are missing. InDesign is spending time checking something I already know about—and forcing me to respond with Don’t Update Links.
Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.

To create an index entry which refers to another entry, select one of the cross-reference options (such as See or See also) from the Type pop‑up menu, and input the entry name in the Referenced text box, or drag the existing entry from the list at the bottom to the Referenced box. You can also customize the See and See also terms displayed in the cross-reference entries by selecting Custom Cross Reference from the Type pop‑up menu. (See Add “See” or “See also” cross-references to an index.)

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