When you have a multiple-page document, such as a brochure or catalog, using master pages will save you time. Master pages are used to automatically insert layout elements on various pages. All elements of the master page are placed onto any page you choose, and these are by default not selectable, which allows you to further develop the page without worrying about accidentally modifying the pre-defined elements (such as page numbers, grids and guides, and graphic elements).

   If you are a shop that relies on one version of CorelDRAW and it is installed on multiple computers, you may be in for a surprise and added expense if you update to a service pack 6.1 or higher, or if you decide that when a new version of CorelDRAW comes out, you want to upgrade and install one license on a number of computers. For example, if you usually have four people working at the same time on their own computers, then each version on each computer will require its own license. I know that a lot of shops have the same version of CorelDRAW on multiple computers. So, when upgrade time comes you could be in for a significantly higher cost.
Note that some versions of Word may have slightly different ways to create numbering. Each version of Word is slightly different, so some of the exact placement of buttons may change. However, all current versions of Word allow page numbering by double-clicking on the top or bottom of the page. This will allow you to open up the Page Number menu.[3]
If you’re not satisfied with these prefab styles, you can easily modify them: Right-click the style name in the Style gallery, and choose Modify. Make whatever changes you want (click Bold to render all the text in that style in bold type, for example), and click OK. Now all of the text in the document that you have formatted using that style will automatically update to reflect your change.
When I learned that CorelDRAW was not available for the Mac, I was shocked. I had just assumed that this graphics program had to be available for Mac OS X. In order to use CorelDRAW on my Mac, I needed a program that allowed me to run Windows on a Mac. My first choice was the virtualization software VirtualBox. It worked, but the performance wasn’t very good and I couldn’t properly configure the screen resolution.
The old (and buggy) Layout Adjustment feature found in previous versions of InDesign has now been retired. The Liquid Layout feature is still available, but few InDesign users take advantage of it. (Liquid Layouts provide a rule-based way of resizing pages. You can read about it in “Alternate Layouts” in InDesign Magazine issue #74.) Instead, the new Adjust Layout feature is easy to use and does a surprisingly good job of making changes to page items for you.
- On occasion you may have content…you'd like appearing at the top of every page.…Maybe at the bottom of every page.…How about automatic page numbering for example.…That's what we're going to talk about in this movie…and we're going to do it with our with our…Landon Hotel newsletter we've been building.…And here as we look at page one,…zoomed in to see the whole page…I don't see any page numbering there.…If we go to pages two and three,…well it looks like there might be something up there…at the top left and top right hand corner.…So let's zoom in and I'm going to use the slider…and go to around 100% and just scroll up…to the top of the pages,…and let's move over to the left hand side.…

If we want to work with columns, we can also determine the number of columns and distance between them in "Tools > Options > Workspace > Document > Guides > Presets > User Defined > Columns". An important detail is, not to be confused with Paragraph Text columns which involves splitting a block of text into two or more columns (Text menu > Columns…). Dividing the page into columns does not automatically separate the text or content ̶ it's just a visual reference.
Use "Format Page Numbers" for specific changes, like types of numbers and chapter headings. If you want to go the extra mile, double-click on the header or footer once again. Click "Page Numbers," then click "Format Page Numbers" under the menu that appears. From here, you can set different types of numbers, like Roman numerals or letters, as well as customize the basic appearance of numbers. It is not incredibly robust, but it works.
When you generate the index, each topic is listed, along with the page on which it was found. The topics are sorted alphabetically, typically under section headings (A, B, C, and so on). An index entry consists of a topic (the term readers look up) paired with either a page reference (page number or range) or a cross-reference. A cross-reference, preceded by “See” or “See also,” points the reader to other entries in the index, rather than to a page number.
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