Other sources of major problems on target computers are ‘styles’, or lack of them, and ‘lists’. It’s beyond the scope of this brief comment here to explain why but they are the source of many problems. It’s more noticeable in large documents because page numbers in cross references and table of contents are obviously wrong. On closer inspection you’ll start to notice that lists are not always correct, more noticeable with numbered lists, and that some styles are no longer correct.
try this…if you place all your graphics and set up a figure number style, and place some of your styles in an inline text frame and the ones that need to fall outside the text frame, the numbering will be off, UNTIL you take the blue anchor frame and anchor it to text of the stand alone graphics, then the figure numbers will then be in order. It also works on 11×17 pages where you have to link the figure number to the previous page and then Anchor Object options and use the Inline or above Line (position) to move text frame to the next page. :-)
Two more I always change are Appearance of Black and File Handling. I set my global default to Display and Print Blacks Accurately (I still don’t know who would not want this changed), and I constantly change my File Handling Default Relink Folder from Original Link Folder to Most Recent Relink Folder depending on what I’m doing in the file. I also ditch all of the colors from the swatches palette and set my default paragraph style to reflect my most-used font, hyphenation, h&j, etc.
I have a document which was created in Word and has 226 pages. When I send it to a client who is using a later version of Word, it looks totally different and has over 330 pages. How can I send the client the document without it changing? Also, they wanted a pdf version, which looks nothing like the Word document. How can I get the Word document to look like the pdf?
It’s autumn, so it must once again be time for a brand new version of InDesign! Indeed, Adobe has just released InDesign CC 2019, and I’m pleased to report that almost every InDesign user will find something to smile about. This upgrade brings significant (though often-hidden) changes to the user interface, as well as innovative ways to fit images to frames and to set spacing between paragraphs. A newly revamped font menu gives you more ways to choose and preview fonts. You can import comments from a PDF. And of course there are the usual small tweaks and changes, including some refinements to footnotes and endnotes. Whether you’re a beginner or advanced InDesign user, you’re going to want to check out the new features in CC 2019. (In addition to this article, you may enjoy watching some of Anne-Marie Concepción’s new Lynda/LinkedIn Learning video title that covers each of these new features in depth, InDesign CC 2019 New Features.)
Other sources of major problems on target computers are ‘styles’, or lack of them, and ‘lists’. It’s beyond the scope of this brief comment here to explain why but they are the source of many problems. It’s more noticeable in large documents because page numbers in cross references and table of contents are obviously wrong. On closer inspection you’ll start to notice that lists are not always correct, more noticeable with numbered lists, and that some styles are no longer correct.
InDesign CC 2019 can now attempt to intelligently and automatically fit the best part of an image inside a frame, rather than your having to manually position it. Of course, what “the best part of the image” means is always open to argument, but Adobe is using a machine-learning algorithm—part of their Adobe Sensei artificial intelligence initiative.
My point is, if you (like myself) often work with large and/or highly complicated graphics, you may want to hold off on changing any global “Display Performance” settings and instead adjust the quality on a per-graphic basis. If you do change the global settings to “High-Quality Display” and start to notice the program lagging a bit, you should turn down the display settings of each graphic (starting with the largest) to “Typical Display” until that lag goes away. If you want to see a preview of what your graphics will ultimately look like use the “Presentation” (Shift+W) preview. Hope these tips help!
If she is using the standard windows fonts, then install drivers for the printer that you have at church. Some printers may use a slight bit more space per line than others. A page that is full between the margins will then overflow on that printer. Installing the printer, even if you cannot print to it, will let your computer see how that printer will format the page.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.
In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
If the same characters are input in the Topic Level box, they are handled as separate index entries if a different yomi is entered. For example if “Cat” is input as an index entry with a reading of “Neko” in katakana, and then input a second time with a reading of “Neko” in hiragana, two index items for “Cat” will be generated. This feature can also be used to classify the same term under separate index topics. For example, when entering the term “The Cats” in an index, if “Cats” is input in the Yomi text box and two index entries are created without any input, the term “The Cats” will be generated under the T and C index topics.
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