Few people think this feature is handy. Yet many of us frequently work with tables given to us by clients. The one I run into most often is the Excel spreadsheet of price listings and item features, which I have to make presentable for a catalog or sales collateral. Many designers recreate these tables from scratch to make them clean and attractive, but this can be time-consuming, especially with large tables.
Yes! As a professionally trained typographer of more than 25 years, picas and points are THE standard for good typography. By their lack of recent use, it’s indicative that instructors are glossing over this very easy and important way of understanding layout measurements (type is not done in inches, period – inches are for the document size). Doing math with picas is so much easier than in inches. Want to divide that 11″ tall (66 picas) page into thirds easily? That would be 22 picas … and in inches it’s a messy 3.66666666. That last measurement is especially fun to find when you’re placing guides in a document – but 22 picas is easy. Buy a pica gauge, which will show both picas and inches, to educate yourself on how to create exceptional type (the beauty of the words and their layout should carry a piece, not the images alone).
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
its eternal failure with the colors when printing, only the experience makes me know what color to choose so as not to have direct colors on the screen. When exporting complex vectors with shadows the program gives an error and you can see some white lines that are not in the graphic piece (this always happens and there is no way to avoid it) unless the shadows are erased
Microsoft’s own Publisher program is a step down from those applications in both power and price, but not every version of Office includes Publisher, and it costs $140 to purchase separately. However, chances are good that you already own a copy of Microsoft Word, and that software has a host of desktop publishing tools that you can use to produce pages that rival the output of the best layout artist.
One feature of the Adobe Creative Suite is the ability to copy and paste between its applications. But just because you can do this doesn’t mean you should. Vector files should still be created in Illustrator, and raster images should be saved in Photoshop. Not only will you be able to maintain control of these elements, but you’ll be saved from having to update every single occurrence of a given element in multi-page documents. Keep a given graphic in a separate Illustrator or Photoshop file, and you’ll be able to update all occurrences of it with one click.
One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
Cons: The one thing i can say that i didn't pretty much like with coreldraw is that it is somehow hard to learn, it takes a long time before you get use to the user interface and also the shortcut keys are not common unlike the Microsoft shortcut keys that are straight forward, but once you get use to the system, then sky is your limit because it's fun working with coreldraw and so many wonderful things can be done on it.
First, create the text boxes by clicking the Insert tab on the Ribbon, clicking Text Box > Draw Text Box, and then dragging your mouse to draw a text box on the page. Repeat this step to create a second text box on a later page. Next, select the first text box and click Drawing Tools > Format > Create Link. The cursor will change to resemble a jug with a down-pointing arrow in it. Position the cursor over the second empty text box, and click once to link the two text boxes. Now when you type or paste text into the first text box, and there’s too much to fit in the first box, it will overflow into the second box. The best part is that you can edit within either box, and the text will automatically flow back and forth as you cut or pad the story.

PSDs take up significant memory, which can sometime cause problems when exporting as PDF. I would recommend avoiding PSD files for simple images that could just as easily be flattened when saved as TIFF or EPS. But in cases where using a PSD file really solves a problem, make sure it is 300 PPI and in CMYK color mode, and keep it at its actual size. And when exporting to PDF, double-check that the transparency flattening is set to high.


On measurements… I’ve made a fortune fixing all the poorly crafted jobs of people who don’t use picas and points. When you size type you use points – I can honestly say I RARELY run across situations where type in a file is sized in inches or metrically. It makes more sense to use one system of measurement of an entire document. Points are a sub unit of picas and beyond that you can be much more precise – 72 points in an inch (not even getting into half or quarter points) can you tell me what 1/72 of an inch is in a decimal value off the top of your head? Likely not. Then again I keep seeing layouts where the width of a text box is along the lines of 4.5839″ by 6.2991″ – you keep doing your sloppy work and I’ll keep making money. And when you can’t figure out why things look slightly off in your design in terms of spacing of elements or alignments, tell me once again how picas and points are so very arcane.
One of the harder things to do in Adobe InDesign, surprisingly for a page layout tool, is to create multilevel or outline format numbered lists.  The right way to accomplish this, according to the folks at Adobe, is to create a Style for every level of the list you’d like to have! Here are Adobe’s instructions on how to do so (This content is taken directly from https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/bullets-numbering.html#create_multi_level_lists):
I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.
It’s autumn, so it must once again be time for a brand new version of InDesign! Indeed, Adobe has just released InDesign CC 2019, and I’m pleased to report that almost every InDesign user will find something to smile about. This upgrade brings significant (though often-hidden) changes to the user interface, as well as innovative ways to fit images to frames and to set spacing between paragraphs. A newly revamped font menu gives you more ways to choose and preview fonts. You can import comments from a PDF. And of course there are the usual small tweaks and changes, including some refinements to footnotes and endnotes. Whether you’re a beginner or advanced InDesign user, you’re going to want to check out the new features in CC 2019. (In addition to this article, you may enjoy watching some of Anne-Marie Concepción’s new Lynda/LinkedIn Learning video title that covers each of these new features in depth, InDesign CC 2019 New Features.)
To make the best use of the first few pages of a newsletter, you should start a long story on one page and finish it on a later page. That way, you can fit more stories on the front page, which is what your readers will see first. You can accomplish this by placing the story in linked text boxes, so that when the first text box is full, excess text will automatically flow into the second text box.
I love Adobe InDesign. For multi-page documents, it’s the most flexible and complete application out there. Yet I remember how counter-intuitive some things were when I was learning it for the first time. Here are some tips I wish I had known when starting out, as well as some answers to questions that others often ask me. This is not intended to be a manual; some good ones are already out there (although I personally learned by doing). Hopefully, these tips will help you make the best of your day-to-day use of InDesign. If you are preparing a document for print, keep your margins and bleeds in mind from the beginning. Your printer will give you the measurements for the bleed, but generally 1⁄8 inch or 3 mm should suffice. Approximately the same area within the document should be kept free of text and important graphic elements (such as the logo). Set up your document for bleed in InDesign as you create it by selecting the correct settings in the document set-up box.
Leo, thanks for being available. I have a new hp and have a problem on WORD keeping a newsletter together. It is only one page; however, I have used a half dozen color photos. I have done letters like this for years, so I can’t understand it, except that I am now 89 years of age. Why does my letter come apart when I try to send it via email? Thanks for helping! Ricardo
Whatever the design, many times your client will ask for an alternate color scheme or additional options for fonts and text attributes. In other cases, you may want more options for your design. Spending time creating these options manually can add hours and additional costs to your project. Instead, why not use “Styles” in CorelDRAW? In this webinar, Anand Dixit, CorelDRAW Master, graphic designer and trainer will show you how to create options for your designs in minutes, including:
In this chapter, we’ll walk through InDesign’s typesetting features. We’ll start with character formatting (font, point size, kerning, and baseline shift are examples of character formatting), move on to paragraph formatting (indents, tabs, space above and below, and composition), and then dive into formatting using character and paragraph styles. Along the way, there may be a joke or two.
Anyway, there's a good alternative: create a PDF. To do this, you can go to File > Publish to PDF (or go to File > Export (CTRL+I), and there choose PDF). But it is not enough just to create a PDF, since not all the PDF's have the same configuration. For example, a PDF for the web will produce a PDF of low quality but it will be a small file, suitable for attaching to an email or using on a web page. But for printing, we need the opposite: images of high quality and resolution. PDF settings is also a topic that requires a lengthy explanation, but this excedes the scope of the current tutorial. There are many different configurations, according to each company's work flow. But we propose a simple format that should work with most of the job outputs: choose PDF X-3 in the PDF Presets drop-down list, then go to "Settings" and change the "Compatibility" to Acrobat 8.0 or higher. Why? Because the PDF X-3 is a good standard but it has a default compatibility with Acrobat 4.0, which does not support transparencies and lenses. This problem is solved by changing the compatibility.

I love picas and points, and have used them almost exclusively since the early 90s (with QX, then InDesign). Of course, I use inches or cm for page sizes and such, but picas/points is just more convenient for fine-tuned positioning on the page. After all, there are almost 3 points in a single mm! I’d rather move something 1 pt than have to type .2 mm.
At this point, you could click OK and start your document. But, let's modify the scheme instead. Click the Define New Number Format button. In the resulting dialog, click the Font button and choose Chiller from the Font list and click OK (only once). Click inside the Number format control—to the left of the example character—and enter Heading, as shown in Figure D. Click OK twice. If you check the properties now (Figure B), you'll find a numbering scheme. Click OK once more to return to the document. Heading 1 in the Styles Quick Gallery displays the new numbering scheme.
If you're using Word Online, you can add page breaks but not section breaks. If you have the Word desktop application, use the Open in Word command to open the document. When you’re done and you save the document, it will continue to be stored where you opened it in Word Online. If you don’t have Word, you can try or buy it in the latest version of Office now.
My problem is similar but it happens when the same printer is used and different pcs. We have several word docs that are the direction inserts for the products we make. They were all created with Word XP and all are formatted to fit to 2 pages. We got 2 new Dell Optiplex pcs last year. No problem. We got 2 new Dell Vostro pcs in April. No problem. We upgraded to Word 2003 in June. There is no problem with the new pcs but on the old pcs, the direction inserts spread to more than 2 pages, a lot more. The pcs are networked and they are all accessing the same files. They all run Windows XP home edition. When you print the insert from the old pc it is evident that the font looks a little bigger. Of course we could change the formatting but then, when printed from the new pcs the text would be too small. It
For my workflow, I decided to turn off Check Links Before Opening Document in the File Handling pane of the Preference dialog. Yes, sometimes I do have the imported files, but in those cases I don’t move the files. And I have to check the links before output anyway. Anything you can do to make opening documents more seamless is nice, so check out this preference and others in this area.
A Vector and a Bitmap application are its main components but you also get a Font Manager, tons of clip-arts and assorted useful components such as to import and export all formats and it runs any plug-in you would use in PhotoShop, plus customised color pallets and native support for cmyk for most any kind of publishing you may want to create in it, as well as x-1A PDF export, editable presets or custom PDF settings as well.
You can now preview type you have selected in a layout in any font by hovering your mouse over the font name in a list of fonts. This can be used in the Control panel, Character panel, and Properties panel menus. For example, in Figure 5, the heading for a book cover is selected on the page, and in the font family menu, Abadi MT Condensed Extra Bold is being previewed. (In earlier versions, you could do something similar, but you had to hover and also press a modifier key on the keyboard.) You can also preview the currently selected text directly in the font family menu by setting the sample text options pop-up menu to Selected Text.

17 Jan 2006[20] X3 (13) X3 † 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, X3 2000, 2003, XP (32-bit, 64-bit), Vista(32-bit only), 7, 8 Double click Crop tool (the first vector software able to crop groups of vectors and bitmap images at the same time), Smart fill tool, Chamfer/Fillet/Scallop/Emboss tool, Image Adjustment Lab. Trace became integrated inside Draw under the name PowerTrace.
Just wanted to post my thanks for this, had a verry similar issue at working using a clients custom fonts, installed them to a few machines. Same document, connected to same printers and same word settings, a number of extra pages would randomly been added to any documents using the fonts but revert back when moved to a good machine. Been searching for a week and done the same as above seems to have solved it!!!
I'm using Word 2016 (desktop) on a Windows 10 64-bit system, but this article applies to earlier versions. 365's browser edition displays numbered lists and offers a few basic settings. However, you can't apply either option discussed in this article using the browser. For your convenience, you can download the sample demonstration .docx or .doc file.
Thank you very much for this! It seems to do the trick! I have about 80 images in each chapter of my document so I am hoping this will work throughout…It seems that anchoring the figure number text frames to the (cross-referenced) figures in the main text works….There are some pages where I only have images and figure descriptions so I think I will anchor the figure descriptions to each other in this instance….unless there is a better way of doing this? Is it possible to anchor the text frame to the text within the box itself?!

Sorry to hear it, but many thanks for the confirmation.  It will save me time looking for easier solutions.  I'll manually solve the problem this time, waiting until right before printing before I # the notes across docs manually, and think of a script if I continue to use InDesign after.  Still, I'm stunned that the coders have built in automatic page numbering, and yet not this.  Not much different for footnotes, as you suggest (check the final # of footnotes, increment by 1 and that is the # of the first footnote in the next doc), and as someone else mentioned. 
I never place .eps files. I place the native .ai files instead and haven’t had a problem. I prefer points and picas, but that’s just my choice. I remember the olden days in college with fondness…when we actually learned about points and picas and drew letters with pencil on tracing paper to learn about line spacing, word spacing, and kerning. Our fonts were Helvetica, Bodoni, Garamond, and (oops, too vintage here…I forget). Type On!
Eliminate the need to draw and project dimension objects in multiple steps thanks to the advanced dimension tools. Display precise measurement values in building plans and more, including radial and diameter dimensioning. Plus, with projected dimension options, your projected drawings can be quickly documented with precise and dynamic dimension lines and text. desktop numbering using coreldraw
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