Let's say you want to use different page numbers or number formats and styles in different parts of your document. You could use page numbers such as i, ii, iii… for the introduction and table of contents and 1, 2, 3… for everything after. The trick is to divide the document into sections and to make sure those sections aren’t linked. Then, set the page numbering for each of those sections by following these steps.
InDesign CC 2019 can now attempt to intelligently and automatically fit the best part of an image inside a frame, rather than your having to manually position it. Of course, what “the best part of the image” means is always open to argument, but Adobe is using a machine-learning algorithm—part of their Adobe Sensei artificial intelligence initiative.
For multiple figure references, I am using Grant’s solution, i.e.: captions are numbered “Figure^.^#:” and then my basic paragraph style GREPs any “Figure~.” to an invisible style (tiny font, white colour). I chose a punctuation space (^. or ~. in GREP) to distinguish it from other instances of “Figure “. This is pretty effective, but another issue remains unresolved: it seems one cannot include a nonbreaking space in a number/bullet style. This means that the text “Figure 121” can break across lines (I have tried selecting “No Break” in my caption style…no joy). So even now that the resulting string is “Figure^SFigure^.121”, where “Figure^.” is invisible, the break at the punctuation space (^.) occurs.
Unlike other desktop publishing programs, Microsoft Publisher isn't designed to stand alone. It's available as part of certain versions of Microsoft Office, and consequently pairs well with the rest of the Office suite. For example, it natively imports Microsoft Word .doc and .docx files, parsing them perfectly and integrating them into complex layouts with ease. Likewise, if you need a table or graph from Excel in your next newsletter, you can pull it in without hassle.

One of the most common issues is related to the image quality. For example, if you download an image from the internet, such as a wallpaper, it will be good for viewing on your screen but not for printing. Most of the images on the internet are low-quality (for example 72 dpi or 96 dpi), because it makes uploading the images to the web faster. But this resolution is not good for printing, because the image will be "pixelated" with jagged edges and the printed result will be bad.


Better performance when working with text. Improvements have been made in text performance—for example, in typing, deleting, adding columns, and inserting footnotes—providing a snappier performance. However, note that at the time of this writing, there is a frustrating performance problem that appears the first time you select the Type tool after launching InDesign. Fortunately, this long delay doesn’t appear again until the next time you launch InDesign.


If activated, you likely see the Desktop Alert in the lower right-hand corner of your screen every time you receive an email, displaying a quick preview of the email. The intent is that regardless of the application you are in, you can quickly view the email by clicking on the Desktop Alert. However, for many of us, the Desktop Alert only proves to be a distraction from various tasks at hand.
More than one person can work simultaneously in a document. In Word Online and Word 2016, real-time presence helps you see where your co-authors are working in the document so that you don't create conflicts as you edit, and you can see changes as they're being made. Word 2013 supports simultaneous editing, but there is no presence indication, and changes can't be seen by multiple authors until the document is saved. To learn more about real-time co-authoring, see What's new in Word Online and Collaborate on Word documents with real-time co-authoring.
Cons: The biggest problem CorelDraw faces is that it is not advancing as quickly as its competitors. I still believe it is the best tool for the specific projects I had in the past, but if I had a project that involved solely vector illustration, or photo editing, I'm not sure if CorelDraw would be the best choice for it. It really shines in projects that would normally require a mix of PS, AI and ID. I hope that it continues to advance in the future so that it remains relevant for other types of projects as well.
The text frame is fairly self-explanatory. After creating the shape for a text frame (typically a rectangle, but it could be a circle or a custom shape drawn with the Pen tool), you have two options: either type directly in the frame or import content from another document. To import, go to the File menu and choose Place (or use the shortcut: Command + D on a Mac and Control + D on Windows).
Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.
Tip: Normally, the visibility and printability should be enabled or disabled together. Remember, a visible layer cannot be printed or exported if printability is disabled, and a non-visible layer can be printed and exported if printability is enabled. A layer that is visible but non-printable can be used to keep notes with the file. I use such a layer to keep the print details and other job information, so that I can refer to them at any time.

So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
Cons: The biggest problem CorelDraw faces is that it is not advancing as quickly as its competitors. I still believe it is the best tool for the specific projects I had in the past, but if I had a project that involved solely vector illustration, or photo editing, I'm not sure if CorelDraw would be the best choice for it. It really shines in projects that would normally require a mix of PS, AI and ID. I hope that it continues to advance in the future so that it remains relevant for other types of projects as well.

Ensure a consistent look, style, and layout throughout your design projects with Object Styles, Color Styles and Color Harmonies. With the enhanced Object Styles in Corel DESIGNER, you can manage object styles, such as outline color, line style, line width, halo, fill type and color, and text styles. You can then create symbol libraries that can be accessed and used across projects. Reuse the style definitions that you create once and apply to the individual components in the custom symbols.
Eliminate the need to draw and project dimension objects in multiple steps thanks to the advanced dimension tools. Display precise measurement values in building plans and more, including radial and diameter dimensioning. Plus, with projected dimension options, your projected drawings can be quickly documented with precise and dynamic dimension lines and text.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
Roger Wambolt, senior product trainer at Corel, eases in with an exploration of the interface and touches on the major players in the toolbox: the Pick, Shape, Crop, Curve, and Interactive tools. Then, once you know how to draw simple lines and shapes, he shows how to group, copy, and adjust objects on your document page. Plus, learn about working with text, using the new Font Manager and the extensive library of fonts in CorelDRAW, adding and editing images, automating tasks with scripts and macros, creating color palettes, and preparing your CorelDRAW projects for print. Roger closes with some tips on customizing the CorelDRAW interface to be more productive and create your designs in fewer steps.

One feature of the Adobe Creative Suite is the ability to copy and paste between its applications. But just because you can do this doesn’t mean you should. Vector files should still be created in Illustrator, and raster images should be saved in Photoshop. Not only will you be able to maintain control of these elements, but you’ll be saved from having to update every single occurrence of a given element in multi-page documents. Keep a given graphic in a separate Illustrator or Photoshop file, and you’ll be able to update all occurrences of it with one click.
Word is not designed for handling large document collaboration, which includes sending clients reports. As Leo has suggested, create the PDF of your report and send that your client. If they want changes, have them communicate them back and you make the necessary changes and then PDF the revised report again. It’s the only way that you can be absolutely certain that your client sees what you intended.
Footnote numbering is not continued across documents in a book. This is an expected behavior and not a bug. Please see the section Footnote numbering and formatting options in this URL: http://help.adobe.com/en_US/indesign/cs/using/WSa285fff53dea4f8617383751001ea8cb3f-6f37a.h tml. Please see attached screen: However, if you have threaded text frames across your book documents, then Footnote numbering will continue.
Pros: I use this software from so many years ago and with the time they have always improve, I use this to modify and edit images vectorizing and making great design for my presentations, through the years Corel DRAW have added more features and options to make the design more complex and details, the bright options and the vectorizing tool are better than they were in the past, the details of the images is awesome and the extension are endless, for design this is one of my favorites.
I am designing my first book on indesign for a client who wanted to turn an academic paper into a book therefore it has a lot of references in the footnotes. The format we are using is a super script number in the body text and end notes at the end of every chapter with a continuous numbering throughout the book.  I am importing text individually for every chapter but I have not managed to find a way to keep the footnote numbering continuous in this method. Also I am not very experienced in running scripts.

The CorelWORLD Real Life Video Tutorials was produced for the CorelWORLD Conference. The video package features more than 2.5 hours of tutorials on CorelDRAW, including extensive lessons on Corel® PHOTO-PAINT™. Discover how easy a difficult task can be when you apply the correct process, and see why things go wrong when you don't make the right choices. The tutorial package is included for free with the WorkPLACE Ready Training Package.
For multiple figure references, I am using Grant’s solution, i.e.: captions are numbered “Figure^.^#:” and then my basic paragraph style GREPs any “Figure~.” to an invisible style (tiny font, white colour). I chose a punctuation space (^. or ~. in GREP) to distinguish it from other instances of “Figure “. This is pretty effective, but another issue remains unresolved: it seems one cannot include a nonbreaking space in a number/bullet style. This means that the text “Figure 121” can break across lines (I have tried selecting “No Break” in my caption style…no joy). So even now that the resulting string is “Figure^SFigure^.121”, where “Figure^.” is invisible, the break at the punctuation space (^.) occurs.
However, note that just because you choose a font doesn’t mean your audience will see it. Fonts used for list or combo boxes are embedded (so the final viewer will definitely see them in the correct font). However, fonts you choose for text fields are not embedded in the PDF, and so the end user will only see the correct font if they’re using Adobe Acrobat or Reader and have those fonts active on their computer. If the fonts aren’t present, Acrobat and Reader will substitute Adobe Serif MM or Adobe Sans Serif MM.
Microsoft Publisher is an application that turns your computer into a desktop publishing center--allowing you and your students to create a number of professional looking documents. With Publisher, you can create a class newsletter, a flier for an upcoming fundraiser, invitations for a class function, or informational brochures on any number of topics.

Re: Number 4, you state “ a brilliant production artist mentioned to me that nobody really knows picas except for people with newspaper training.” This is FALSE. None of the professionall designers I know worked in newspapers, and we all use picas because the units of measure make a lot more sense when used in conjunction with type sizes. 14 points of space after a paragraph is 0.1944 inches, and 15 points is 0.2083 inches. Picas and points are the measurement system of typography. Sure, you can measure in hectares if you’re the only one working on your files, but if you want to be taken seriously as a professional designer, you should learn the craft of your chosen profession. 


When making an index for Japanese text, the yomi for index entries in the Topic Level box should be entered in the Yomi box using full-width hiragana and katakana. It is not necessary to input the yomi for full-width hiragana, katakana, alphanumeric characters, some symbols, half-width alphanumeric characters, or index entries that only have symbols in the Yomi box. Entries input in the Topic Level box are sorted. In some cases, when full-width and half-width symbols are mixed in an entry, sorting may not take place as expected. An appropriate, yomi should be entered in these cases.
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