Leverage all the power you need with full support for technical publication standards, latest version .DWG CAD file import, and over 100 other data file formats to publish, share and output important technical documents. Using a diverse set of cross-media publishing and distribution capabilities, including CGM, WebCGM (incl. S1000D 4.2), SVG and PDF, you will ensure all of your important technical files will be delivered in a readable format.
	Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.

In December 2006 the sK1 open-source project team started to reverse-engineer the CDR format.[38] The results and the first working snapshot of the CDR importer were presented at the Libre Graphics Meeting 2007 conference taking place in May 2007 in Montreal (Canada).[39] Later on the team parsed the structure of other Corel formats with the help of the open source CDR Explorer.[40] As of 2008, the sK1 project claims to have the best import support for CorelDraw file formats among open source software programs. The sK1 project developed also the UniConvertor, a command line open source tool which supports conversion from CorelDraw ver.7-X4 formats (CDR/CDT/CCX/CDRX/CMX) to other formats. UniConvertor is also used in Inkscape and Scribus open source projects as an external tool for CorelDraw files importing.[41][42][43]
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Please help! I must of actually hit a keyboard command without know it or something. Recently my text colour palette at top application menu is “dropping up” instead of “dropping down” which is causing my colours to run up and off screen at top. Currently using work around with having my swatch window open but would obviously like to fix this. Tried rebooting program… Nothing is working. So annoying! 🙁
Make the most of your content and important data by repurposing it from existing sources, including 3D designs with the integrated XVL Studio Corel Edition, and the optional XVL Studio 3D CAD Corel Edition add-on for advanced 3D CAD assembly formats. You’ll benefit from full support for a variety of content exchange types including .DWG CAD files, and over 100 other data file formats, and the ability to instantly access content through Corel® CONNECT™.
I am just in the process of having a website designed and when I view the website on my desktop it looks fine. Everything is aligned, pictures and tables where they are suppose to be, but when I look at it on my office computer or home laptop, it looks a mess with the tables all distorted and pictures smaller and overlapping. The programmer is telling me there is nothing she can do about that….this seems strange considering I see everyone elses websites and they look consistent. I’m thinking she doesn’t have the experience to do the website. I sent her a 22 page PowerPoint presentation to use for the web design layout, but I’m not sure of what software she is using to to convert the Powerpoint file to a website. Does anyone have any suggestions? I’m really concerned about how unprofessional the site is going to look,
Theory is great, and articles like this one can give you quick useful tips, but the best way to learn is by practice. If you are new to InDesign, try this: use an existing layout as a guide (anything you want: a page from a magazine, a poster or a business card), and try to recreate it from scratch. Familiarize yourself with the tools, menus and options. If you get stuck, you can always search for tips and tutorials or ask a friend.
Regarding the display settings, InDesign users who are still using CS6 or earlier will often take a serious performance hit by setting “Display Performance” to “High-Quality Display” if they have any high-res raster images or complex vector graphics. I assume that this is due to there not being a 64-bit version of InDesign before CC. Even if you have a high-end machine, 32-bit programs can’t utilize all of your system’s resources. And even with the 64-bit CC version, you’ll have performance issues if you use enough high-res/complex graphics in one document. Unlike Photoshop and Illustrator CC, InDesign has no option to use graphical hardware acceleration – i.e. it can’t use a dedicated graphics card, so all of the computations have to be run through the CPU; this too can bottleneck it’s performance.
Overall: I have used coreldraw for laser-printing various things and I have been able to make very basic use of the software due to my relatively limited exposure to it. Coworkers who have been using it for months on end can easily navigate the software but I find myself having to use the help tabs and google much more often than I would like for a design software. This is definitely a higher skill platform but is VERY powerful once you get used to it.
The problem we are having is that 2 computers in our house are viewing special characters differently. For my job we use the plus minus sign a lot. One one computer it works fine, the other computer it appears like an upside down A. They both have word 2003, they both have windows XP and they both use the same printer. So, what is causing this and is there a way to rectify the problem?
Another possible solution if this is a document that has to be read by several or many people is to consider (remember we are talking about a 300 page document) creating a eBook format. Then the reader has some control over the format, or they can leave it alone. With a document this large, I would often load it onto a laptop, eReader, even a phone as the possibility of me being able to find the time to read it at one sitting without interruptions are very slim. This is not effective for all situations but I have found that when I am doing an intensive white paper, which might run into this many pages, the audience likes the ability to move it around to various device as they are reading. You can read PDF in a eReader, but by establishing it in LIT or ePub format then can comfortably read it on a phone, tablet, eReader, or laptop, as well as the main computer. Free programs like calibre will do the conversions for you, as well as be available to read it. On my android phone and tablet I use Aldiko which reads ePub, also free, and as an added bonus you can use the Calibre as a content server to download to you phone or tablet.
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
However, note that just because you choose a font doesn’t mean your audience will see it. Fonts used for list or combo boxes are embedded (so the final viewer will definitely see them in the correct font). However, fonts you choose for text fields are not embedded in the PDF, and so the end user will only see the correct font if they’re using Adobe Acrobat or Reader and have those fonts active on their computer. If the fonts aren’t present, Acrobat and Reader will substitute Adobe Serif MM or Adobe Sans Serif MM.
Changing the sort order affects the sort order in the Index panel and in the index stories that are generated afterwards. You can create multiple indexes with different sort orders. For example, you can generate an index in German, change the sort order, and then generate a separate index in Swedish — just make sure Replace Existing Index isn’t selected when you generate the index.
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