In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.

The problem we are having is that 2 computers in our house are viewing special characters differently. For my job we use the plus minus sign a lot. One one computer it works fine, the other computer it appears like an upside down A. They both have word 2003, they both have windows XP and they both use the same printer. So, what is causing this and is there a way to rectify the problem?
When you start working with the new Properties panel, you’ll likely find yourself frustrated because it’s just “version 1” and is a work in progress. For example, when you see an ellipsis (…) at the lower right of a section, clicking it expands the section to show additional choices. However, currently the collapsed or expanded state isn’t “sticky” between sessions, so it often closes even when you want it to stay open.
   However, one other thing that you can be assured of is that there is very little fanfare with the release of a new “service pack,” which has updates, fixes and/or enhancements for existing software. In fact, you might not even know the service pack exists unless your software notifies you. The same can be said for CorelDRAW. At the time of this writing, CorelDRAW had released four service packs since the initial release of version X6 in 2012.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.

24 Aug 1995[12]	6	3, 4, 5, 6	5, 6	95	This is the first version which was made exclusively for 32-bit Windows. New features were customizable interface, Polygon, Spiral, Knife and Eraser tools. Corel Memo, Corel Presents, Corel Motion 3D, Corel Depth, Corel Multimedia Manager, Corel Font Master and Corel DREAM (for 3D modelling) were included in the suite.

From version X4 (14) on, the CDR file is a ZIP-compressed directory of several files, among them XML-files and the RIFF-structured riffdata.cdr with the familiar version signature in versions X4 (CDREvrsn) and X5 (CDRFvrsn), and a root.dat with CorelDraw X6, where the bytes 9 to 15 look slightly different -- "CDRGfver" in a file created with X6. "F" was the last valid hex digit, and the "fver" now indicates that the letter before does no longer stand for a hex digit.

Ensure a consistent look, style, and layout throughout your design projects with Object Styles, Color Styles and Color Harmonies. With the enhanced Object Styles in Corel DESIGNER, you can manage object styles, such as outline color, line style, line width, halo, fill type and color, and text styles. You can then create symbol libraries that can be accessed and used across projects. Reuse the style definitions that you create once and apply to the individual components in the custom symbols.

Should stability issues occur when logged on as a specific user, try creating a new user account with the same permissions and run the application. If the problem(s) no longer occurs, they may have been related to the specific user profile. For information on creating user accounts in Windows XP 32\\64 bit, Windows Vista 32\\64 bit, and Windows 7 32\\64 bit operating systems, please consult the Windows Help files.
      If you are using X6 and upgraded to X6.1 or higher, you also have the ability to see if you are signed in by looking at the bottom right of your screen where you will see a small green man icon. Figure 4 shows a red arrow pointing to this icon. If you are not logged in, the icon will be red. If you click on the black arrow beside the icon, it will display your membership type. Figure 5 shows I have a standard membership and Figure 6 shows that I have a premium membership.
These limitations will drive some InDesign users crazy, but there is an easy solution, at least for the first two problems: to have separate footnote numbering for a table, and place the numbering under the table rather than at the bottom of the page (interspersed with other footnotes), simply place each table in a text frame of its own. Then, if necessary, you can anchor that text frame into the larger text story. That said, if the new features still don’t meet your needs, check out Peter Kahrel’s article “Going Deep with Footnotes” in InDesign Magazine issue #95.
I first refered directly to the chapter 1-level paragraph style, but then got problems when a new chapter started on a right-page and not a left page, some picutures refered the previous chapter style. I then copied the chapter 1-paragraph style and made small text boxes with just the paragraph number on each page that starts a new chapter. I changed the text colour to no colour.
Using an indexing shortcut, you can quickly index individual words, a phrase, or a list of words or phrases. Adobe InDesign recognizes two indexing shortcuts: one for standard index entries; the other for proper names. The proper name shortcut creates index entries by reversing the order of a name so it is alphabetized by the last name. In this way, you can list a name with the first name first, but have it appear in the index sorted by last name. For example, the name James Paul Carter would appear in the index as Carter, James Paul.
×