Content-Aware Fit is not enabled by default. If you want to make it apply automatically to all placed images, turn on “Make Content-Aware Fit the default frame fitting option” in the General pane of the Preferences dialog box. You may find some type of graphics work well with the algorithm and some may not, so you may need to experiment with the images used in your workflow. In my experience, the feature seems to work better with raster images than with vector graphics.
Theory is great, and articles like this one can give you quick useful tips, but the best way to learn is by practice. If you are new to InDesign, try this: use an existing layout as a guide (anything you want: a page from a magazine, a poster or a business card), and try to recreate it from scratch. Familiarize yourself with the tools, menus and options. If you get stuck, you can always search for tips and tutorials or ask a friend.

Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.


It’s autumn, so it must once again be time for a brand new version of InDesign! Indeed, Adobe has just released InDesign CC 2019, and I’m pleased to report that almost every InDesign user will find something to smile about. This upgrade brings significant (though often-hidden) changes to the user interface, as well as innovative ways to fit images to frames and to set spacing between paragraphs. A newly revamped font menu gives you more ways to choose and preview fonts. You can import comments from a PDF. And of course there are the usual small tweaks and changes, including some refinements to footnotes and endnotes. Whether you’re a beginner or advanced InDesign user, you’re going to want to check out the new features in CC 2019. (In addition to this article, you may enjoy watching some of Anne-Marie Concepción’s new Lynda/LinkedIn Learning video title that covers each of these new features in depth, InDesign CC 2019 New Features.)
Cons: There is a lot of features and that is not an understatement. As the result, it does take some time to learn about all of them. If I don't use it for a while, my learning curve goes up quite a bit but it also goes down just as fast. The one feature I do have trouble with is a perfect circle but the convert to curves and the grid function do solve that.
Pros: I use CorelDraw because I want to be able to depict that rawness of a character based on my imagination. Working with visual artists, writers and creative directors gets the synergy going, and being able to execute the characters through graphics and illustrations is truly magical. CorelDraw includes a lot of images and fonts where we can garner ideas from and refine to make them unique. I used this program specifically for a fashion designer character in our project and I'm glad I did, because CorelDraw specializes in fashion illustrations. It brought our character to life and made her shine.
One of the most common issues is related to the image quality. For example, if you download an image from the internet, such as a wallpaper, it will be good for viewing on your screen but not for printing. Most of the images on the internet are low-quality (for example 72 dpi or 96 dpi), because it makes uploading the images to the web faster. But this resolution is not good for printing, because the image will be "pixelated" with jagged edges and the printed result will be bad.
Using an indexing shortcut, you can quickly index individual words, a phrase, or a list of words or phrases. Adobe InDesign recognizes two indexing shortcuts: one for standard index entries; the other for proper names. The proper name shortcut creates index entries by reversing the order of a name so it is alphabetized by the last name. In this way, you can list a name with the first name first, but have it appear in the index sorted by last name. For example, the name James Paul Carter would appear in the index as Carter, James Paul.
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