Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.
In this chapter, we’ll walk through InDesign’s typesetting features. We’ll start with character formatting (font, point size, kerning, and baseline shift are examples of character formatting), move on to paragraph formatting (indents, tabs, space above and below, and composition), and then dive into formatting using character and paragraph styles. Along the way, there may be a joke or two.
Check Apply Leading to Entire Paragraphs in the Type panel is basically a sign that you don’t know how to use InDesign efficiently and that you’re mostly using it like Illustrator instead. If you use styles instead of manually changing everything, you’ll never have to check that option, ever. That’s because Paragraph styles affect everything in the paragraph, including the invisible characters such as spacing at its end.

You can now preview type you have selected in a layout in any font by hovering your mouse over the font name in a list of fonts. This can be used in the Control panel, Character panel, and Properties panel menus. For example, in Figure 5, the heading for a book cover is selected on the page, and in the font family menu, Abadi MT Condensed Extra Bold is being previewed. (In earlier versions, you could do something similar, but you had to hover and also press a modifier key on the keyboard.) You can also preview the currently selected text directly in the font family menu by setting the sample text options pop-up menu to Selected Text.
The text frame is fairly self-explanatory. After creating the shape for a text frame (typically a rectangle, but it could be a circle or a custom shape drawn with the Pen tool), you have two options: either type directly in the frame or import content from another document. To import, go to the File menu and choose Place (or use the shortcut: Command + D on a Mac and Control + D on Windows).
   So why am I breaking with tradition and reviewing what has been updated? Well, there are some new features that have been released with the service packs but there is also one very important change that was released with service pack 1 (X6.1) that we need to talk about. This change relates to the terms of the CorelDRAW end user license agreement (EULA). This change that Corel has introduced and the way you install the program could cost you some extra money if you upgrade to this service pack or future versions of the software.
In 2012 the joint LibreOffice/re-lab team implemented libcdr, a library for reading CDR files from version 7 to X3 and CMX files.[47] The library has extensive support for shapes and their properties, including support for color management and spot colors, and has a basic support for text.[48] The library provides a built-in converter to SVG, and a converter to OpenDocument is provided by writerperfect package. The libcdr library is used in LibreOffice starting from version 3.6,[49] and thanks to public API it can be freely used by other applications.
The easiest way to implement a numbering scheme for headings is to add one to a heading style. To illustrate, we'll modify Heading 1 by adding a numbering scheme. First, right-click Heading 1 in the Styles gallery (in the Styles group on the Home tab). Then, choose Modify as shown in Figure A to launch the Modify Style dialog. If you thumb through the default properties, you'll not find a numbering scheme (Figure B). Click the Format button and choose Numbering as shown in Figure B. If necessary, click the Numbering tab. Choose the predefined scheme that's the best match for what you want (Figure C).
Content-Aware Fit is not enabled by default. If you want to make it apply automatically to all placed images, turn on “Make Content-Aware Fit the default frame fitting option” in the General pane of the Preferences dialog box. You may find some type of graphics work well with the algorithm and some may not, so you may need to experiment with the images used in your workflow. In my experience, the feature seems to work better with raster images than with vector graphics.
We now navigate to "Layout" and choose "Booklet" from the Layout drop-down list. It is important to verify that the option "Facing pages" is active in order to see the magazine as it is read: the first and last pages as individual pages (as if the magazine is closed), and then pages 2-3, 4-5, etc. However, when creating the PDF each page will be individual, as it should be, so you can use any imposition software. If an object or image occupies two pages, it will be cut automatically.
Cut and copy work in a similar way. Highlighting a piece of text, right-clicking and selecting copy/cut will store the text in memory [memory: used to store data ]. The difference is copy leaves the highlighted text behind where as cut removes it. To insert the copied/cut text into a different area of the document, a different document, or an entirely different application altogether, right-click and select paste.

I use cross-reference in my text which is works perfectly. but always I have had big problem when I wanted to put several Figures in parenthesis. simply I want to write for example (Figs 2-3 and 2-4) instead of Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4). as you know I can delet Fig and write by hand Figs but as soon as I update the fields all the fig will come back and makes like (Figs Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4). I hope some of you can help me to solve the problem


By default, every time you open an InDesign document, the links to graphics and text files are checked. If anything is amiss, you get an alert rather than an open document. This seems slow to me, especially because I often open documents only to edit them. In many cases, I don’t even have the graphic files, so of course they are missing. InDesign is spending time checking something I already know about—and forcing me to respond with Don’t Update Links.
I use cross-reference in my text which is works perfectly. but always I have had big problem when I wanted to put several Figures in parenthesis. simply I want to write for example (Figs 2-3 and 2-4) instead of Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4). as you know I can delet Fig and write by hand Figs but as soon as I update the fields all the fig will come back and makes like (Figs Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4). I hope some of you can help me to solve the problem
When desktop publishing appeared, we found that it couldn’t do everything Ole could do with his Compugraphic—but that being able to see what our type would look like before we printed it more than made up for any deficiencies. These days, page layout programs are far more capable than Ole’s trusty EditWriter. Does that mean, however, that there’s no more room for improvement? For surprising new features? Is typesetting “done”?
First, add the image to your Word document, select the image, and choose Picture Tools on the Ribbon toolbar. Click Format > Wrap Text > Tight. Now, with the image still selected, click Format once more and choose Edit Wrap Points. A red line with black markers, called wrap points, will appear around the image. Adjust this line by dragging the wrap points: You can drag the wrap points inward to wrap text over the image, or drag them outward so that the text moves away from the image. Drag on the line itself to create additional wrap points, as desired. When you’re done, click away from the image, and the wrap points will disappear.
When making an index for Japanese text, the yomi for index entries in the Topic Level box should be entered in the Yomi box using full-width hiragana and katakana. It is not necessary to input the yomi for full-width hiragana, katakana, alphanumeric characters, some symbols, half-width alphanumeric characters, or index entries that only have symbols in the Yomi box. Entries input in the Topic Level box are sorted. In some cases, when full-width and half-width symbols are mixed in an entry, sorting may not take place as expected. An appropriate, yomi should be entered in these cases.
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