I’m new to InDesign, and thought I had sorted out figure numbering but am having trouble with the way that figures are numbered in my document. I set it up as described in this post, but some of my figures are in line and the captions are just another line of text in the body of the story, while others are full page graphics with text box captions that are not linked to the body of the document. Currently, the figure numbers run sequentially through the figures that are in line in the document, and then continue with the full page graphics. The problem is that the full page graphics come before any of the in line graphics, so they are out of order. Is there any way to correct this?

17 Jan 2006[20] X3 (13) X3 † 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, X3 2000, 2003, XP (32-bit, 64-bit), Vista(32-bit only), 7, 8 Double click Crop tool (the first vector software able to crop groups of vectors and bitmap images at the same time), Smart fill tool, Chamfer/Fillet/Scallop/Emboss tool, Image Adjustment Lab. Trace became integrated inside Draw under the name PowerTrace.
You Forgot to mention the awesome new Spinning Beach Ball Feature in Indesign 2019…. yea hundreds of upgraders report Spinning Beach Balls at every turn.. even in iMac Pros w/ 40GB of RAM.. Yea just like last year, riddled with Bugs. I’ll stick with 13.1.0 until March or April 2019 when Adobe addresses all this and more in the one and only update for the year. Quark is waiting stage left.
The old (and buggy) Layout Adjustment feature found in previous versions of InDesign has now been retired. The Liquid Layout feature is still available, but few InDesign users take advantage of it. (Liquid Layouts provide a rule-based way of resizing pages. You can read about it in “Alternate Layouts” in InDesign Magazine issue #74.) Instead, the new Adjust Layout feature is easy to use and does a surprisingly good job of making changes to page items for you.
Sending a Word (or any format document) doesn’t convert anything when it is send as an attachment. The most common culprit, from my experience, is when the document uses fonts which the receiver(s) don’t have on their computer. In that case a different similar font is used. Using only fonts which come preinstalled on all Windows versions will solve many (but not all) of the incompatibility problems. Unfortunately, this won’t work on a different OS such as MacOS or Linux. The best solution is to convert the document to .pdf and it should work on all machines.
Publish to 3D PDF with interactive viewing of 3D content in combination with other visual and text elements. Export from Corel DESIGNER to 3D PDF to generate output with all pertinent data and graphics in one document for cross-media publishing. 3D PDF files can be viewed with free PDF reader applications that are installed on almost any desktop or laptop computer.
Microsoft Publisher’s templates make publication design easy. If you need to create a quick publication with minimal effort, you can simply use one of Microsoft Publisher’s many templates. There are hundreds of easy-to-use templates to choose from, which are designed to simplify the layout and make creating your ideal publication quick and easy. If you can’t find the template you’re looking for, simply go online and you’re bound to find one you can download for free!
The text frame is fairly self-explanatory. After creating the shape for a text frame (typically a rectangle, but it could be a circle or a custom shape drawn with the Pen tool), you have two options: either type directly in the frame or import content from another document. To import, go to the File menu and choose Place (or use the shortcut: Command + D on a Mac and Control + D on Windows).
I love picas and points, and have used them almost exclusively since the early 90s (with QX, then InDesign). Of course, I use inches or cm for page sizes and such, but picas/points is just more convenient for fine-tuned positioning on the page. After all, there are almost 3 points in a single mm! I’d rather move something 1 pt than have to type .2 mm.
A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.
As it's one of the many programs that come with Microsoft Office, there is a good chance you already have Publisher on your computer. It's been included with higher-end copies of Office for almost 20 years, offered as a lightweight alternative to professional layout software such as Adobe InDesign. Though it's rarely used in a professional capacity, Publisher remains a surprisingly capable desktop publishing application. It sports excellent typography tools and one of the best template selections we've ever seen. It comes up somewhat short in the area of graphics editing support, but given its strengths, especially its usefulness in creating long-form publications, Microsoft Publisher remains a great option for at-home users, earning our Top Ten Reviews Bronze Award.
In general, change the feature settings in the dialog box, and then save the settings. Styles and presets are stored in the document in which they are created. You can use the settings from another document by importing or loading the styles and presets from that document. In addition, most presets can be exported or saved to a separate file and distributed to other computers.
[Instructions and lists abstracted from Adobe Application Manuals. Adobe, the Adobe logo, Acrobat, Captivate, FrameMaker, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, and RoboHelp are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © Adobe Systems Incorporated.]
Cons: The basic disadvantage that I find is the same as it applies to any graphic software of vector character: you must have a computer equipped with a powerful and powerful processor that allows you to perform all the calculations necessary to design with this software, a task that becomes a lot slower to the extent that the number of data rises, as more elaborate designs are desired.
Publisher's greatest weakness is its lack of graphic design tools. Where other desktop publishing packages let you craft logos or touch up photographs, Microsoft Publisher supports neither. Instead, it sticks to simpler effects such as 3D extrusions, bevels and basic quickshapes. If you're not experienced with any sort of image editing or graphic design, you might not miss those omissions, but the ability to smooth out a blemish or recolor a stock logo can make all the difference between a template and a personalized publication. If you want a program that offers more graphic design tools, you might be interested in Xara Page & Layout Designer.

If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
But not all documents can use the CMYK color mode, because it requires 4 inks. If you create a file with only two or three colors (e.g. blue and yellow) perhaps it is best to use only two or three colors (Spot Colors), such as Pantone colors. In addition, not all colors can be printed using CMYK, e.g. "Gold", "Silver", etc. Some bright colors can only be achieved by using special inks, and these cannot be achieved with CMYK. Spot colors are also important for "non-printing objects" (for example, an outline to die cut) or "overprinted objects" (such as UV varnish). It's not only vectors that can use spot colors, also bitmaps can use Spot Colors. On the Bitmap Menu go to Mode > Duotone and convert the bitmap to one ("monotone"), or more spot colors.
We recently converted to Microsoft Windows XP and Microsoft 2007 applications. Subsequently, we received larger (24-inch) monitors. When using MS Word 2007, we made the dicovery that the on-screen view (and printed version) of a document page is not necessarily the same view (and printed version) that another user will see when viewing (or printing) the same page. For example, my page 19 may be another’s page 22. My layout looks great on-screen (and printed); another user’s layout (page endings, etc.) is different and not what we want. What is the source of this problem? How do we fix this so that we can ensure that what we see is what others will see when we distribute our documents?
Pros: It has a very old-school user interface, while also being very simple learn and grasp. It has a great variety of features -- while not as many as Adobe Illustrator or as versatile as Affinity Designer -- are still plenty in general to make good art and even work with raster images. It also has a good stylus support, making it great for complex vector illustrations. And its also very stable and reliable.
As a final note, I also use this feature for my bibliography, which has about 230 references right now. (Thank goodness they finally added the capability to put text before the automatic number. InDesign CS2 is incapable of rendering an automatic list of bracketed numbers.) Anyway, the cross-referencing works great, but I run into the same problem that Dolati mentioned about having to manually change “Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4” to “Figs 2-3 and 2-4.” Changing the linked text does cause problems when you update the cross references. So, I set up a character style (invisible) that changes the text to white and changes the tracking so that the text doesn’t take up any horizontal space. That way, when I have a set of references like [5][6][7][12], I type [5-7,12] next to the references and apply the invisible character style to the linked references. Then, I don’t have to worry about the linked text giving me a warning that it needs to be updated. Also if the reference numbers change, I can (1) change the invisible character style so that I can see the text, (2) update the typed reference, and (3) put the invisible character style back how it was. This solution is far from ideal, but it works.
Few people think this feature is handy. Yet many of us frequently work with tables given to us by clients. The one I run into most often is the Excel spreadsheet of price listings and item features, which I have to make presentable for a catalog or sales collateral. Many designers recreate these tables from scratch to make them clean and attractive, but this can be time-consuming, especially with large tables.
The old (and buggy) Layout Adjustment feature found in previous versions of InDesign has now been retired. The Liquid Layout feature is still available, but few InDesign users take advantage of it. (Liquid Layouts provide a rule-based way of resizing pages. You can read about it in “Alternate Layouts” in InDesign Magazine issue #74.) Instead, the new Adjust Layout feature is easy to use and does a surprisingly good job of making changes to page items for you.
Another master layer is created for the names of the weekdays, which are also common to all pages. The sequential position of the background and the weekdays is different, which is why two master layers are needed. The weekdays layer is sixth from the bottom in the sequence of layers. This master layer must be placed on top of all layers (Figure 9).
Ensure a consistent look, style, and layout throughout your design projects with Object Styles, Color Styles and Color Harmonies. With the enhanced Object Styles in Corel DESIGNER, you can manage object styles, such as outline color, line style, line width, halo, fill type and color, and text styles. You can then create symbol libraries that can be accessed and used across projects. Reuse the style definitions that you create once and apply to the individual components in the custom symbols.

So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!


Enjoy a more natural drawing experience and achieve more expressive results with the native support for Microsoft Surface, and advanced stylus support. Take advantage of pressure, bearing, tilt, and rotation when using the touch-up tools, painting and other brush tools within the applications. Experiment with rotation, flatness and elongation settings to control your brushstrokes in any given illustration.


Publisher's greatest weakness is its lack of graphic design tools. Where other desktop publishing packages let you craft logos or touch up photographs, Microsoft Publisher supports neither. Instead, it sticks to simpler effects such as 3D extrusions, bevels and basic quickshapes. If you're not experienced with any sort of image editing or graphic design, you might not miss those omissions, but the ability to smooth out a blemish or recolor a stock logo can make all the difference between a template and a personalized publication. If you want a program that offers more graphic design tools, you might be interested in Xara Page & Layout Designer.

Workspace settings are used to save customization information in CorelDRAW. Custom toolbars, menus and shortcut keys are all saved to the workspace on exit. The next time CorelDRAW is launched, all customization from the previous session is restored. On occasion however, problems may develop with custom workspaces which affect the operation of CorelDRAW. It may be required that the workspace be reset in order to improve application performance. For information on how to reset the workspace in CorelDRAW, refer to Resetting Application Defaults in CorelDRAW® and PHOTO-PAINT® Running on Windows®

Have a customer that creates pricebooks for JohnDeer Dealers in excel then converts with acrobat & uploads them to a website. He got a virus forcing us to wipe and reload his PC. Reinstalled the same exact version of excel & everything else. But now when he opens his old excel files that he works in. The Fonts are tiny in some of his tables/cells. He has called me over and over again. I have told him to try decreasing his resolution or increasing the percentage size of items. & to check if some auto size font feature in excel is checked or unchecked. I am at a loss what else to tell him. I came across this website & The notion that maybe he used to have a special font that was lost in the wipe n reload. Is there a way to dissect one of his xls files to find out if they are calling for a font name we no longer have and it is being substituted for a different font by excel that is much smaller.
Word's numbered list feature is easy to use but modifying the results isn't always as intuitive as you might like. As is often the case with Office, knowing the right setting to use and where to find it is the key. In this article, we'll take a basic look at Word's numbering feature and then move on to two common problems—indents and alignment—that are easy to solve if you know where to look and how to alter the setting to get the results you want.
In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.

The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
Another possible solution if this is a document that has to be read by several or many people is to consider (remember we are talking about a 300 page document) creating a eBook format. Then the reader has some control over the format, or they can leave it alone. With a document this large, I would often load it onto a laptop, eReader, even a phone as the possibility of me being able to find the time to read it at one sitting without interruptions are very slim. This is not effective for all situations but I have found that when I am doing an intensive white paper, which might run into this many pages, the audience likes the ability to move it around to various device as they are reading. You can read PDF in a eReader, but by establishing it in LIT or ePub format then can comfortably read it on a phone, tablet, eReader, or laptop, as well as the main computer. Free programs like calibre will do the conversions for you, as well as be available to read it. On my android phone and tablet I use Aldiko which reads ePub, also free, and as an added bonus you can use the Calibre as a content server to download to you phone or tablet.
Ole’s tale: “Late night. The pale glow from the monochrome monitor of my Compugraphic phototypesetter. The smell of the office standard ‘French Vanilla’ coffee—warming, now, for several hours and resembling nothing so much as battery acid. The gentle snoring of one of the staff writers, who is curled up in the warmth of the unit that holds the filmstrips containing the fonts I’m using to set his story.
I’d have to know what you mean by “come apart” and exactly how you send it. If you’re actually sending a WORD document (.docx, .doc) then this article you just commented on should answer your question: word documents DON’T necessarily display the same everywhere. Generally the “right” way to publish is to save as PDF and send PDFs around — it’s actually exactly why PDF was invented. 🙂
A Vector and a Bitmap application are its main components but you also get a Font Manager, tons of clip-arts and assorted useful components such as to import and export all formats and it runs any plug-in you would use in PhotoShop, plus customised color pallets and native support for cmyk for most any kind of publishing you may want to create in it, as well as x-1A PDF export, editable presets or custom PDF settings as well.

Overall: I started learning graphic design on Corel way back when... and then I switched to Adobe and learned the ins and outs of that. Then eventually got a job that was already using Corel so I went back to it. They are very similar... I like them both in terms of Draw vs Illustrator... but Photo Paint vs Photoshop, well, Photoshop will beat them there. With that said, I can still make Photo Paint do what I want so it works.

Other sources of major problems on target computers are ‘styles’, or lack of them, and ‘lists’. It’s beyond the scope of this brief comment here to explain why but they are the source of many problems. It’s more noticeable in large documents because page numbers in cross references and table of contents are obviously wrong. On closer inspection you’ll start to notice that lists are not always correct, more noticeable with numbered lists, and that some styles are no longer correct.
Use "Format Page Numbers" for specific changes, like types of numbers and chapter headings. If you want to go the extra mile, double-click on the header or footer once again. Click "Page Numbers," then click "Format Page Numbers" under the menu that appears. From here, you can set different types of numbers, like Roman numerals or letters, as well as customize the basic appearance of numbers. It is not incredibly robust, but it works.
Although Microsoft Publisher is often associated with newsletter and brochure design, that’s not the only things it’s good for. You can use the software to create a wide range of publications including proposals, product sheets, services guides and much, much more! Whatever type of publication you’re looking to design, you can guarantee that Microsoft Publisher will help you do it.
We recently converted to Microsoft Windows XP and Microsoft 2007 applications. Subsequently, we received larger (24-inch) monitors. When using MS Word 2007, we made the dicovery that the on-screen view (and printed version) of a document page is not necessarily the same view (and printed version) that another user will see when viewing (or printing) the same page. For example, my page 19 may be another’s page 22. My layout looks great on-screen (and printed); another user’s layout (page endings, etc.) is different and not what we want. What is the source of this problem? How do we fix this so that we can ensure that what we see is what others will see when we distribute our documents?
By default, every time you open an InDesign document, the links to graphics and text files are checked. If anything is amiss, you get an alert rather than an open document. This seems slow to me, especially because I often open documents only to edit them. In many cases, I don’t even have the graphic files, so of course they are missing. InDesign is spending time checking something I already know about—and forcing me to respond with Don’t Update Links.
If activated, you likely see the Desktop Alert in the lower right-hand corner of your screen every time you receive an email, displaying a quick preview of the email. The intent is that regardless of the application you are in, you can quickly view the email by clicking on the Desktop Alert. However, for many of us, the Desktop Alert only proves to be a distraction from various tasks at hand.

As it's one of the many programs that come with Microsoft Office, there is a good chance you already have Publisher on your computer. It's been included with higher-end copies of Office for almost 20 years, offered as a lightweight alternative to professional layout software such as Adobe InDesign. Though it's rarely used in a professional capacity, Publisher remains a surprisingly capable desktop publishing application. It sports excellent typography tools and one of the best template selections we've ever seen. It comes up somewhat short in the area of graphics editing support, but given its strengths, especially its usefulness in creating long-form publications, Microsoft Publisher remains a great option for at-home users, earning our Top Ten Reviews Bronze Award.


Publisher's greatest weakness is its lack of graphic design tools. Where other desktop publishing packages let you craft logos or touch up photographs, Microsoft Publisher supports neither. Instead, it sticks to simpler effects such as 3D extrusions, bevels and basic quickshapes. If you're not experienced with any sort of image editing or graphic design, you might not miss those omissions, but the ability to smooth out a blemish or recolor a stock logo can make all the difference between a template and a personalized publication. If you want a program that offers more graphic design tools, you might be interested in Xara Page & Layout Designer.

Pros: The first advantage is that it is a vector program, with which you can work on tracings and bring the designs to embroideries, engravings, prints among others, also supports the transparency of the TIF image files which other programs do not, allows editing fast, you can perform complex tasks with very few clicks, their tools are very intuitive and easy to use.
Dark interface propbems – (sorry last post went wrong!!) Is there anyway of changing the interface colour in CS6? I would also prefer a lighter interface as can’t always see the type on the darker grey, can’t seem to find it on 6. Also does anyone know if you can make the handles on drawing objects any larger? All the designers must hace very young eyes, as a more mature designer(!!) they are REALLY difficult to see even with glasses and they stay the same size when you zoom in.
Sending a Word (or any format document) doesn’t convert anything when it is send as an attachment. The most common culprit, from my experience, is when the document uses fonts which the receiver(s) don’t have on their computer. In that case a different similar font is used. Using only fonts which come preinstalled on all Windows versions will solve many (but not all) of the incompatibility problems. Unfortunately, this won’t work on a different OS such as MacOS or Linux. The best solution is to convert the document to .pdf and it should work on all machines.
Lastly, please do not use the keyboard shortcuts in this article to achieve foot and inch marks. The true marks are in the Symbol font – or can be found in the “glyphs” palette. The other marks are prime and double prime; seasoned designers and typographers know the difference, just as they know the differences and uses between hyphens, en-dashes and em-dashes.
By default, every time you open an InDesign document, the links to graphics and text files are checked. If anything is amiss, you get an alert rather than an open document. This seems slow to me, especially because I often open documents only to edit them. In many cases, I don’t even have the graphic files, so of course they are missing. InDesign is spending time checking something I already know about—and forcing me to respond with Don’t Update Links.
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