Track essential design details and key information with dynamic callout tools. Sticky callouts will connect or "stick" to source objects as they are moved around or modified. You can also link callout text to source shape metadata. Callouts based on object metadata are dynamic, helping you efficiently and consistently implement updates and changes.
When you have a multiple-page document, such as a brochure or catalog, using master pages will save you time. Master pages are used to automatically insert layout elements on various pages. All elements of the master page are placed onto any page you choose, and these are by default not selectable, which allows you to further develop the page without worrying about accidentally modifying the pre-defined elements (such as page numbers, grids and guides, and graphic elements).

CorelDraw is quite expensive to purchase outright. This makes it difficult for an independent user to justify such a large expenditure unless the software is used frequently. For most students, grad students or researchers who lack a big software budget, open-source applications may do the job just as well. But if you need a pro-grade tool that can handle any task, then you'll do well to purchase CorelDraw.
I am just in the process of having a website designed and when I view the website on my desktop it looks fine. Everything is aligned, pictures and tables where they are suppose to be, but when I look at it on my office computer or home laptop, it looks a mess with the tables all distorted and pictures smaller and overlapping. The programmer is telling me there is nothing she can do about that….this seems strange considering I see everyone elses websites and they look consistent. I’m thinking she doesn’t have the experience to do the website. I sent her a 22 page PowerPoint presentation to use for the web design layout, but I’m not sure of what software she is using to to convert the Powerpoint file to a website. Does anyone have any suggestions? I’m really concerned about how unprofessional the site is going to look,
And I'll get there by choosing the Page that I want to affect.…In this case Page 9 and I'll double-click on that, so I can actually jump to it.…I'm going to select that page and then go to the Pages panel menu and choose…Numbering & Section Options.…You're going to also find that under the Layout menu, there it is, Numbering…and Section Options.…When you choose that, it let's you change the Page Numbers for any page you have…selected in the Pages panel, Right now it's set to Automatic Page Numbering,…
These limitations will drive some InDesign users crazy, but there is an easy solution, at least for the first two problems: to have separate footnote numbering for a table, and place the numbering under the table rather than at the bottom of the page (interspersed with other footnotes), simply place each table in a text frame of its own. Then, if necessary, you can anchor that text frame into the larger text story. That said, if the new features still don’t meet your needs, check out Peter Kahrel’s article “Going Deep with Footnotes” in InDesign Magazine issue #95.
Overall: In 1997, when I was using a x486 PC, I did SO much with this program! I did dozens of flyers for my business, for more than 5 years. I designed and sent to press a video tape sleeve for a show we produced. I made all the chyrons for the TV show! We made PoP signs for the retail shop, we made files for banners and sent them to a sign maker.!
To create an index entry which refers to another entry, select one of the cross-reference options (such as See or See also) from the Type pop‑up menu, and input the entry name in the Referenced text box, or drag the existing entry from the list at the bottom to the Referenced box. You can also customize the See and See also terms displayed in the cross-reference entries by selecting Custom Cross Reference from the Type pop‑up menu. (See Add “See” or “See also” cross-references to an index.)
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