First, add the image to your Word document, select the image, and choose Picture Tools on the Ribbon toolbar. Click Format > Wrap Text > Tight. Now, with the image still selected, click Format once more and choose Edit Wrap Points. A red line with black markers, called wrap points, will appear around the image. Adjust this line by dragging the wrap points: You can drag the wrap points inward to wrap text over the image, or drag them outward so that the text moves away from the image. Drag on the line itself to create additional wrap points, as desired. When you’re done, click away from the image, and the wrap points will disappear.
Thanks. I found this to be extremely helpful for some of those nagging annoyances in iD.  Unfortunately I have to use iD v3 at work.  All but #10 (& the part about changing the bg color in #1) were available as described.  Apparently #10 wasn’t an option until a later version – that would have been nice… but hey – I got a bunch of other awesome workable tips! 😀
      Well, there you have it. CorelDRAW has finally chosen to fall in with the rest of the software world and force users to be legal. This may seem a little harsh in tone, but this is really what they are doing. For some of you out there, the time has come for you to “pay the piper” if you choose to upgrade to a new version of CorelDRAW. To its credit, Corel will now be allowing multi-user discounts for those installs where there are a number of users. Is it right? Sorry, but yes it is. Most other software programs already have the same ELUA and TOS. Corel really is finally putting their proverbial foot down and saying, “We are going to control this in terms of each user having their own license.” If you are one of those people who buys one copy and installs it on ten computers in your office, then you will not be allowed to do this once you have upgraded to X6.1 or higher.
Pros: I know that everyone else in the world uses the Adobe suite of programs from graphic design, but I've been using CorelDraw for years and find it infinitely preferable. The layout of the program and the way various tools work I find to be much more straight forward and intuitive. What I can do in InDesign or Illustrator I can usually do in half the time, in Corel Draw.
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
I work in Microsoft Word a lot, and it just loves to try to help you out. While a lot of its help can be a hindrance, the underlining of possibly misspelled words, repeated words, and the like can be pretty handy. If you’d like to see this in InDesign, check Enable Dynamic Spelling in the Spelling panel of the Preferences dialog. (You can quickly toggle this from the Edit > Spelling menu as well.)
Another preference that mimics Microsoft Word is Autocorrect. If you type in InDesign a lot, turning it on is worth a try. Check Enable Autocorrect in the Autocorrect panel of the Preferences dialog box. Tip: You can use Autocorrect as a poor man’s macro as well. For example, a recent project used the phrase “financial capabilities program” over and over. To speed up the typing of this tedious 30-character phrase, I added a new Autocorrect entry that automatically changed “fcp” to “financial capabilities program.”
Add all of the elements that are repeated throughout most of your document: guides, page numbers, a running text box, image frames, graphic elements, etc. You can have more than one set of master pages in a document, which is particularly useful for brochures, whose content often varies (for example, with a mostly textual introduction followed by image-heavy pages).
First, add the image to your Word document, select the image, and choose Picture Tools on the Ribbon toolbar. Click Format > Wrap Text > Tight. Now, with the image still selected, click Format once more and choose Edit Wrap Points. A red line with black markers, called wrap points, will appear around the image. Adjust this line by dragging the wrap points: You can drag the wrap points inward to wrap text over the image, or drag them outward so that the text moves away from the image. Drag on the line itself to create additional wrap points, as desired. When you’re done, click away from the image, and the wrap points will disappear.
CorelDRAW, when launched will poll the Windows default printer for information specific to the device. It will seek information pertaining to the printers capabilities, such as color capabilities, printable area, duplexing options and others. If a communication problem exists between the printer and the application, a failure to create a new document, or open an existing file may occur. This is particularly true with laptops removed from the network which use a network printer as the Windows default. Other problems may occur which result in random errors or reduced performance if there is a problem with the default printer. To determine if the printer is at fault, install a generic PostScript printer driver and set it as the Windows default printer (a color Apple LaserWriter will suffice). Once installed, check to see if the problems persist. For information on how to install a printer in Windows 2000 or XP, please consult the Windows help files.
To create an index entry which refers to another entry, select one of the cross-reference options (such as See or See also) from the Type pop‑up menu, and input the entry name in the Referenced text box, or drag the existing entry from the list at the bottom to the Referenced box. You can also customize the See and See also terms displayed in the cross-reference entries by selecting Custom Cross Reference from the Type pop‑up menu. (See Add “See” or “See also” cross-references to an index.)
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