When you start working with the new Properties panel, you’ll likely find yourself frustrated because it’s just “version 1” and is a work in progress. For example, when you see an ellipsis (…) at the lower right of a section, clicking it expands the section to show additional choices. However, currently the collapsed or expanded state isn’t “sticky” between sessions, so it often closes even when you want it to stay open.
      Ok, I am no lawyer and do not want to be one. So pardon me if I miss a translation of a point with the TOS or EULA. I am not going to get into this in detail. If you are really concerned, then I suggest you type Terms of Service or EULA and CorelDRAW into Google. There are enough discussions on the web that relate to this topic to keep you going and to breed fire and brimstone in a few of you.

Why would you need another panel for applying formatting to text or objects? Adobe has found that InDesign’s plethora of panels and dialog boxes can be confusing, especially for those who are new to InDesign, or who use it less frequently. So, following the lead of Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC, the new Properties panel shows many of the relevant layout commands. And while it doesn’t offer all the same features as the Control panel (which still exists), even if you are an experienced user you may find the Properties panel faster for some of your workflows because most of your needed commands are found in one place.
Cons: The one thing i can say that i didn't pretty much like with coreldraw is that it is somehow hard to learn, it takes a long time before you get use to the user interface and also the shortcut keys are not common unlike the Microsoft shortcut keys that are straight forward, but once you get use to the system, then sky is your limit because it's fun working with coreldraw and so many wonderful things can be done on it.
Two more I always change are Appearance of Black and File Handling. I set my global default to Display and Print Blacks Accurately (I still don’t know who would not want this changed), and I constantly change my File Handling Default Relink Folder from Original Link Folder to Most Recent Relink Folder depending on what I’m doing in the file. I also ditch all of the colors from the swatches palette and set my default paragraph style to reflect my most-used font, hyphenation, h&j, etc.
Benefit from the versatile authoring tools in CorelDRAW® Technical Suite 2018 that allow you to create detailed assembly instructions, complex user manuals, multi-faceted documentation and more. Achieve unsurpassed productivity with new, high-caliber features to accelerate efficiency, and get full support for technical standards to publish, share or print with this expansive technical illustration and drafting software.
I am designing my first book on indesign for a client who wanted to turn an academic paper into a book therefore it has a lot of references in the footnotes. The format we are using is a super script number in the body text and end notes at the end of every chapter with a continuous numbering throughout the book.  I am importing text individually for every chapter but I have not managed to find a way to keep the footnote numbering continuous in this method. Also I am not very experienced in running scripts.
To make the best use of the first few pages of a newsletter, you should start a long story on one page and finish it on a later page. That way, you can fit more stories on the front page, which is what your readers will see first. You can accomplish this by placing the story in linked text boxes, so that when the first text box is full, excess text will automatically flow into the second text box.
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
Pros: The best thing about CorelDRAW is the versatility it offers when undertaking a design project as well as the variety of formats with which it is compatible. Other programs do not allow working in PDF or PSD formats, for example. This problem was solved with CorelDRAW. In the same way, the measurement systems used by the program are very intuitive, which undoubtedly facilitates the work, saving time.
Place the insertion point in the paragraph and choose Restart Numbering from the context menu or choose Type > Bulleted And Numbered Lists > Restart Numbering. In normal lists, this command assigns the number 1 (or letter A) to a paragraph and makes it the first paragraph in a list. In multi-level lists, this command assigns the first lower-level number to a nested paragraph.
Whatever the design, many times your client will ask for an alternate color scheme or additional options for fonts and text attributes. In other cases, you may want more options for your design. Spending time creating these options manually can add hours and additional costs to your project. Instead, why not use “Styles” in CorelDRAW? In this webinar, Anand Dixit, CorelDRAW Master, graphic designer and trainer will show you how to create options for your designs in minutes, including:
Ha! Thank you Anne-Marie for confirming that this is the way to do it. To not be able to reference the current section number in a numbered paragraph style, when you can do it in a footer is so mind-bogglingly irrational. I’d already worked out the work-around you suggest, but fear that some of the chapters of the project I’m working on may need way too many duplicate sets of figure-reference styles for the solution to be at all elegant. As I’m only at the very start of what will be a two-year project I thought I’d hunt for a more logical solution – I’m amazed that this issue was discussed back in 2010 and that oh-so-simple section marker in paragraph numbering is still not available in December 2014! Maybe we all need to chip in a bit more to Adobe so they can add a few more of their “just do it” feature requests!
The "Color mode" refers to the way in which we use the file, in this case, for high quality printing. The first choice is between RGB or CMYK color modes. RGB has brighter shades but is only good for web and desktop printers (for example inkjet printers) and plotters, but not for commercial printing. RGB has 16.8 million colors and CMYK only 64,000 but all commercial printers use CMYK. If you use a RGB color profile, the color mode will change when the file is sent to print, and perhaps the result will be bad or inaccurate. Then, you should choose CMYK as the "primary color mode" in both dialogues of Tools > Color Management.
I love Adobe InDesign. For multi-page documents, it’s the most flexible and complete application out there. Yet I remember how counter-intuitive some things were when I was learning it for the first time. Here are some tips I wish I had known when starting out, as well as some answers to questions that others often ask me. This is not intended to be a manual; some good ones are already out there (although I personally learned by doing). Hopefully, these tips will help you make the best of your day-to-day use of InDesign. If you are preparing a document for print, keep your margins and bleeds in mind from the beginning. Your printer will give you the measurements for the bleed, but generally 1⁄8 inch or 3 mm should suffice. Approximately the same area within the document should be kept free of text and important graphic elements (such as the logo). Set up your document for bleed in InDesign as you create it by selecting the correct settings in the document set-up box.
If you have Office professional, it comes with MS Publisher. I use that for newsletters and flyers as it’s much easier to control where the text and photos appear. You’d still need to export it as a .pdf, otherwise most people wouldn’t be able to read it. And even if they had MS Publisher, they would still need to have the same fonts installed for it to look the same.

In Japanese, Chinese, or Korean versions, by default, Arabic numerals are used for page numbers. However, if you use the Numbering & Section Options command, you can specify the style of numbering, such as Roman numerals, Arabic numerals, Kanji, and so on. The Style option allows you to select the number of digits in the page number, for example, 001 or 0001. Each part of the document that uses a different numbering style is called a section. For more information on sections, see Define section numbering.
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