- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.

In Figure 4, I placed six raster images from my sample files using the “gridify” feature, producing a 2 × 3 grid of frames. When the Make Content-Aware Fit preference was turned off, the images were placed using the Fit Content Proportionally option (in Object > Fitting). When Make Content-Aware Fit is turned on by default, the feature did a pretty good job of finding the useful content to include within the frames. Of course, you can continue to tweak the image position manually in individual frames after using the fitting command.
I first refered directly to the chapter 1-level paragraph style, but then got problems when a new chapter started on a right-page and not a left page, some picutures refered the previous chapter style. I then copied the chapter 1-paragraph style and made small text boxes with just the paragraph number on each page that starts a new chapter. I changed the text colour to no colour.

Overall: I started learning graphic design on Corel way back when... and then I switched to Adobe and learned the ins and outs of that. Then eventually got a job that was already using Corel so I went back to it. They are very similar... I like them both in terms of Draw vs Illustrator... but Photo Paint vs Photoshop, well, Photoshop will beat them there. With that said, I can still make Photo Paint do what I want so it works.
Overall: I started learning graphic design on Corel way back when... and then I switched to Adobe and learned the ins and outs of that. Then eventually got a job that was already using Corel so I went back to it. They are very similar... I like them both in terms of Draw vs Illustrator... but Photo Paint vs Photoshop, well, Photoshop will beat them there. With that said, I can still make Photo Paint do what I want so it works.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Cons: The biggest problem CorelDraw faces is that it is not advancing as quickly as its competitors. I still believe it is the best tool for the specific projects I had in the past, but if I had a project that involved solely vector illustration, or photo editing, I'm not sure if CorelDraw would be the best choice for it. It really shines in projects that would normally require a mix of PS, AI and ID. I hope that it continues to advance in the future so that it remains relevant for other types of projects as well.
On occasion, re-installing CorelDRAW may be needed to update certain application files. When reinstalling CorelDRAW, turn off all non-critical background services and startup items. This will ensure that no other program conflicts with the installation routine. To disable service and startup items, refer to the instructions previously listed in this document.

      So essentially you now have the option to pay $99 per year and always have the latest version of the software for the term of your premium membership. For example, if you pay the $99 membership fee, you will automatically receive version X7 when it is released. Or you can just buy the latest version of the software and keep the standard account. You will miss out on the so-called extra online content which, hopefully, will evolve and provide more reasons to choose the premium service.

At least 20% of the corrupted file case, the culprit comes from the Page Panel. That thing is a mess and Adobe refuse to recognize its related issues. The thing is that the Page Panel update itself LIVE while you modify the content. It’s DOUBLE the memory usage from reading the page content regardless of the size of the thumbnails and it doesn’t load its content with references to the masters, but instead with reference to individual pages. This means, if you got 75 elements per pages while 30 of those are part of the masters, those 30 are loaded multiple time in the RAM at once as its reference to each page “current” state. Turning off the Preview in the Thumbnails stabilize the document (especially when you move/add/remove pages), but come at the cost that you need to know where you are in the document with the pages numbers. Some might hate it because it requires them to use their brain a bit more (and we all know we’re already over-use it), but it’s a give to receive situation.
I’m new to InDesign, and thought I had sorted out figure numbering but am having trouble with the way that figures are numbered in my document. I set it up as described in this post, but some of my figures are in line and the captions are just another line of text in the body of the story, while others are full page graphics with text box captions that are not linked to the body of the document. Currently, the figure numbers run sequentially through the figures that are in line in the document, and then continue with the full page graphics. The problem is that the full page graphics come before any of the in line graphics, so they are out of order. Is there any way to correct this?

Now, are you thinking to yourself, “I did change that once, but it didn’t stick…?” Even experienced users can get confused by which preferences are document-specific and which ones are application-specific. For help, read A Visual Guide to InDesign Preferences. In the meantime, anytime you find yourself irritated by the state of things in InDesign, take a trip to the Preferences dialog and see if you can change a setting to better suit you, your computer and your work.

So, to create multi-level headings, you need to use the Level option just to the right of the List drop-down box. My second- and third-level headings use the same list as the first-level headings (this is necessary), except that they are changed to Level 2 and 3, respectively. Then, when numbering the section heading, you can insert the number of the previous-level heading above it. These can be selected using the arrow to the right of the Number field and selecting one of the levels under “Insert Number Placeholder.” So, the text in the Number field for my second-level heading is ^1.^#^t and it is ^1.^2.^#^t for the third-level heading. This presents the multi-level heading with dots between the numbers and a tab between the numbers and the section heading.


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Cons: The one area that CorelDRAW could use some help is in it's ability to create maps with real world measurements. For example: if I set the scale to 1" = 20', it would be nice if I could prompt a command to draw a line that is exactly 20' long. Instead, you have to manually draw the line and then measure to get it the correct length. Also, the layers feature in the Object Manager can be a bit troublesome but once you understand how it works it is okay.
Microsoft Publisher is an application that turns your computer into a desktop publishing center--allowing you and your students to create a number of professional looking documents. With Publisher, you can create a class newsletter, a flier for an upcoming fundraiser, invitations for a class function, or informational brochures on any number of topics.
Yes! As a professionally trained typographer of more than 25 years, picas and points are THE standard for good typography. By their lack of recent use, it’s indicative that instructors are glossing over this very easy and important way of understanding layout measurements (type is not done in inches, period – inches are for the document size). Doing math with picas is so much easier than in inches. Want to divide that 11″ tall (66 picas) page into thirds easily? That would be 22 picas … and in inches it’s a messy 3.66666666. That last measurement is especially fun to find when you’re placing guides in a document – but 22 picas is easy. Buy a pica gauge, which will show both picas and inches, to educate yourself on how to create exceptional type (the beauty of the words and their layout should carry a piece, not the images alone).
Using an indexing shortcut, you can quickly index individual words, a phrase, or a list of words or phrases. Adobe InDesign recognizes two indexing shortcuts: one for standard index entries; the other for proper names. The proper name shortcut creates index entries by reversing the order of a name so it is alphabetized by the last name. In this way, you can list a name with the first name first, but have it appear in the index sorted by last name. For example, the name James Paul Carter would appear in the index as Carter, James Paul.
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