Yes! As a professionally trained typographer of more than 25 years, picas and points are THE standard for good typography. By their lack of recent use, it’s indicative that instructors are glossing over this very easy and important way of understanding layout measurements (type is not done in inches, period – inches are for the document size). Doing math with picas is so much easier than in inches. Want to divide that 11″ tall (66 picas) page into thirds easily? That would be 22 picas … and in inches it’s a messy 3.66666666. That last measurement is especially fun to find when you’re placing guides in a document – but 22 picas is easy. Buy a pica gauge, which will show both picas and inches, to educate yourself on how to create exceptional type (the beauty of the words and their layout should carry a piece, not the images alone).

There is an enhanced display of choices when browsing fonts in the Control, Character, and Properties panels font family menus. When you click the Font Family menu, there are two tabs at the top left (Figure 5): the “Fonts” tab shows currently installed or activated fonts. But here’s the cool one that is easy to overlook: The “Find More” tab previews Adobe Fonts that are available to be activated. Yes, that means instant access to thousands of fonts from within InDesign, without having to visit Adobe’s website.

Once you’ve selected a Style Set, the Styles gallery on the Home tab will display a series of styles that you can use to format text in your document. To apply a style, select a block of text (such as a heading) and click an item, such as Heading 1, in the Style gallery. Typically you’ll use Normal for body text and Heading 1 for headings. You can use other styles for special elements in the document.
There it is. Page 2.…If I click inside there I can see it's actually…the word page and the number two.…So if I were to, for example, add additional pages…after page one these would labeled incorrectly…because there not using automatic page numbering.…So let's start by removing these by clicking the border,…and then hitting the Delete key on your keyboard.…
The true power of Microsoft Publisher is in the superb quality and selection of its templates. Unlike so many of its competitors, Publisher links to Microsoft Office's online template portfolio, which is regularly updated and sports crisp, clean designs that can easily jump-start your projects. The template selection isn't particularly huge – you can only expect access to about 700 different options, compared to the thousands that other software offers – but it's diverse, covering every type of project you might undertake. Microsoft hasn't tried to inflate its numbers by offering dozens of ugly variants of the same template, picking quality over quantity every time.
I have installed MS 2007 home/studen on 2 computers in my home; a desktop and a laptop. The programs do not even have all the same fonts. The laptop has some fonts that the desktop doesn’t have and visa versa. Both systems are running Vista and both were installed with the same disk. I have also seen many occasions where the document comes through totally different.
You create, edit, and preview the index using the Index panel (Window > Type & Tables > Index). The panel includes two modes: Reference and Topic. In Reference mode, the preview area displays complete index entries for the current document or book. In Topic mode, the preview area displays only topics, not page numbers or cross-references. Topic mode is used primarily for creating the index structure, whereas Reference mode is where you add your index entries.
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