One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.

If you need to create documents with drop caps, pull quotes, columns, text that wraps around images, and similar desktop publishing elements, you can do so in Word. The only problem is that these tools are scattered all across Word’s Ribbon user interface, and some are buried deep in arcane menus. I'll show you where to find them, and explain how to make the most of them.
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.

Not working on Mac, but had the same issue on my PC (both in v.13 and 14). It disappeared after uninstalling CC Desktop Application after finishing ID installation (with Adobe uninstaller – https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-cloud/help/uninstall-creative-cloud-desktop-app.html) I’m not using CC Cloud so it’s not a problem for me, but I guess it will be a problem if somebody actually needs CC Desktop APP.


When working with large files in CorelDRAW, it may be required to increase the amount of memory allocated to the application. Default memory allocation is set to 25%. This can be increased to as high as 50%, though it is not recommended to exceed this level. Increasing this setting beyond 50% will reduce the amount of RAM being used by Windows, decreasing performance of the entire computer. It may also be required to change drives being used as swap disks. Drives with a high capacity of free space are ideally suited for swap disks. It is also recommended that the primary disk be set to a drive which does not contain the Windows partition. This will improve read and write times if specifying a drive with little or no disk activity.
Pros: CorelDRAW is mostly used software in world of graphics designing in computer and printing press industry. It is the largest world using software that support approximately all languages including unicode languages. It has a lot of tool sets built in the software to design beautiful graphics. It is also using in the newspapers, magazines and books publishing markets. In Pakistan everyone who want become a designer it should have great skills on CorelDRAW. Now these days there are many free and open source softwares available for designing but CorelDRAW is beating all of them.
Microsoft Publisher is an application that turns your computer into a desktop publishing center--allowing you and your students to create a number of professional looking documents. With Publisher, you can create a class newsletter, a flier for an upcoming fundraiser, invitations for a class function, or informational brochures on any number of topics.
the tools are much better than the competition, it is easier to vectorize and edit vectors. when exporting I think it has the most extensive file support, plus I can even open Illustrator files (which I can not do vice versa) the cleaping mask option is better than another, I can edit even the bitmap colors a lot easier without worrying about damaging the original file
Another extremely useful feature for text-heavy documents is Find/Change. I don’t know about you, but in my experience, the longer the text, the greater the chance that the client will ask me to replace all occurrences of a certain phrase or title. When you have a fully laid-out 192-page book with footnotes, glossary and index, the task of manually replacing phrases is rather daunting.
That’s not exactly correct. It prints correctly on one machine but not others. So it’s not the difference between the screen version and the print version. In most cases, it prints as it looks on the screen. Read the article you are commenting on for the reasons. From my experience, the most common reason is due to the different fonts installed on the machines. I once received a document to print and the layout was all wrong. I installed the missing fonts and it printed correctly.
Despite its lack of compatibility with Adobe products, Publisher still shines as a layout tool. Custom guidelines help you align objects on the page, while master pages give you control over elements that will appear on every page of a document, like page numbers or framing blocks of color. Publisher even has full support for CMYK-optimized printing. This is the printing format used by ink printers to produce clear, high quality printing.
As far as figure or table numbering goes, the numbering needs to be done under the same list but on a different level. I use level 4 for my figures and level 5 for my tables. As an example, the figure style has this in the Number field: Figure^.^1-^#:^>. This renders any figure caption anywhere in the document correctly: Figure 3-7, Figure 5-2, Figure 1-11, depending only upon where in the text the style is applied. The ^. is a punctuation space. It’s slightly less than a regular space and keeps any cross-referenced figure instance from breaking over a line; so I’ll never see text like “…see Figure(line break)2-2 for a diagram of…” Also, the en space (^>) adds a nice distance between the figure number and the text explaining the figure.
Dear All, I have corel installed on two laptops. Both of these laptops have arabic support enabled via windows xp. I have been facing a very unusal problem, my problem is that one laptop writes digits in the Hindi numerical form (which are the digits that we use in the arabic writing), the other on doesnt, it only writes the Arabic numerical form (which are the digits used in the english langague). Both these computers have the same set of softwares on them. I have matched the settings for both on them in the control panel, and the font i use is the transparent arabic.
I’d have to know what you mean by “come apart” and exactly how you send it. If you’re actually sending a WORD document (.docx, .doc) then this article you just commented on should answer your question: word documents DON’T necessarily display the same everywhere. Generally the “right” way to publish is to save as PDF and send PDFs around — it’s actually exactly why PDF was invented. 🙂
We recently converted to Microsoft Windows XP and Microsoft 2007 applications. Subsequently, we received larger (24-inch) monitors. When using MS Word 2007, we made the dicovery that the on-screen view (and printed version) of a document page is not necessarily the same view (and printed version) that another user will see when viewing (or printing) the same page. For example, my page 19 may be another’s page 22. My layout looks great on-screen (and printed); another user’s layout (page endings, etc.) is different and not what we want. What is the source of this problem? How do we fix this so that we can ensure that what we see is what others will see when we distribute our documents?
The Classification filter (Figure 7) shows the same categories and icons that are found on the Typekit/Adobe Fonts website for filtering fonts. There are icons for each of eight classifications that were available in earlier InDesign versions, such as Serif, Script, and so on. You can also select properties for weight, width, x-height, contrast, standard or CAPS only, and Default Figure Style.
Leverage all the power you need to publish, share and output important technical documents, including a new capability to publish to WordPress. Using a diverse set of cross-media publishing and distribution capabilities, including CGM, WebCGM, SVG, PDF, and 3D PDF, you will ensure all of your important technical files will be delivered in a readable format and accessible through online, print and mobile options.
When you add a new figure, and figure caption, make sure you anchor the text from the caption box (using blue anchor box on text frames) (if its not inline with the text frame…) and it will update the figure number…. unless you anchor it, it will just become the last number in the document. You will need to do this with all figures. Just anchor them and they will flow and update when needed! Hope this helps!

Create isometric or other parallel projected technical illustrations for assembly and maintenance instructions by dynamically drawing on a projected plane. Project your existing planar objects to a desired plane instead of manually calculating the skew angle and rotation. Obtain more precision and exactness with the UI controls in Corel DESIGNER®, as users can draw and edit shapes using accurate measurements in isometric and other projected drawing modes.
      Here is what Corel has to say about the Premium service: “Premium membership is an optional benefit that only X6 users can elect to purchase annually on top of their perpetual license (it’s automatically included for current subscribers). We offer our premium members early access to new features, exclusive content and upgrades to the next major version of CorelDRAW. In the past year, we have added over 20 new features that only premium members have access to.”
Although Microsoft Publisher is often associated with newsletter and brochure design, that’s not the only things it’s good for. You can use the software to create a wide range of publications including proposals, product sheets, services guides and much, much more! Whatever type of publication you’re looking to design, you can guarantee that Microsoft Publisher will help you do it.
As it's one of the many programs that come with Microsoft Office, there is a good chance you already have Publisher on your computer. It's been included with higher-end copies of Office for almost 20 years, offered as a lightweight alternative to professional layout software such as Adobe InDesign. Though it's rarely used in a professional capacity, Publisher remains a surprisingly capable desktop publishing application. It sports excellent typography tools and one of the best template selections we've ever seen. It comes up somewhat short in the area of graphics editing support, but given its strengths, especially its usefulness in creating long-form publications, Microsoft Publisher remains a great option for at-home users, earning our Top Ten Reviews Bronze Award.
Publications by Wizard provides you with templates you can modify to suit your needs. You have several formatting choices including: Newsletter, Web Sites, Announcement, Invitations, and more. These format choices are located in the left frame of the Catalog window under the title Wizard.� Within each of these formats, you will find many styles, or designs, from which to choose.
If you are using a background, or if an image is near the edge of the page, you should add extra space around the outside. This outer margin is called "bleeding" and is very important because the cut is not always as accurate as expected. This additional margin helps the process of post-printing a lot. You can specify the size of the Bleed when you choose the size of the page. Double-click on the edge of the page, or go to Tools > Options > Document > Page Size. In the section "Bleed" you can set the desired distance (usually 3mm or 0.125"). In addition, you can make this area visible by selecting "Show bleed area".
Despite its lack of compatibility with Adobe products, Publisher still shines as a layout tool. Custom guidelines help you align objects on the page, while master pages give you control over elements that will appear on every page of a document, like page numbers or framing blocks of color. Publisher even has full support for CMYK-optimized printing. This is the printing format used by ink printers to produce clear, high quality printing.
Corel draw has a number of associated programs which are sold as a package when you purchase Corel draw and these are created to work in the same. Photo paint allows you edit photos and othe images for many purposes. A very rounded package of graphic and desktop publishing tools. Corel draw allows you to save and export files in a wide range of types.

New in this version is a Healing tool, which enables the quick editing of blemishes; a Perspective correction tool that gives you a grid-based dialog to fix distortions in photos; and a Gaussian Blur lens a paintable mask that enables you to blur areas of your images non-destructively. There's quite a bit going for photo paint; its creative tools are solid and its typography options excellent.
One thing I find a little odd is if you break apart a line into two or more segments they are still considered part of each other. In other words, once it is broken apart, if you select one of the new segments, it will select all of them. I ended up deleting the others and making new separate one. It isn't a big deal, just a little weird when you first encounter it.
Add context to your technical projects by using 3D views and models in your technical illustrations. With XVL Studio Corel Edition, integrated with CorelDRAW Technical Suite 2018, you can create high-quality renderings from 3D views that are imported from DWG, 3DS, or IGES 3D model files. You can easily transform these 3D views into vector illustrations by using the enhanced “Send to Corel DESIGNER” feature.
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
Other features that may be expected include find and replace, which replaces one word with another, and the ability to import [import: A good or service which enters a country. ] graphics [graphics: visuals intended to brand, inform, illustrate or entertain, eg photographs, drawings, maps, diagrams etc. ], eg from a clip art [clip art: clip art is a library of images, photos and sounds provided by Microsoft as part of its office suite ] library. Headers and footers and page numbering are also very useful.
When you generate the index, each topic is listed, along with the page on which it was found. The topics are sorted alphabetically, typically under section headings (A, B, C, and so on). An index entry consists of a topic (the term readers look up) paired with either a page reference (page number or range) or a cross-reference. A cross-reference, preceded by “See” or “See also,” points the reader to other entries in the index, rather than to a page number.
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