In 1995-6 I “wrote a book” on my Shakespearian laptop (already out of date at the time!). Now laptop is “broken” (no display on screen), how can I “read” this old format programme? (Old Word prog) Also have it on floppy disc but of course current PC’s have no floppy input, and please I don’t want to have to spend any money on new kit ‘cos I don’t have any spare! Many thanks, Hilary

This simple technique makes quick work of a single-level numbered list and accommodates multiple lists within the same document. However, it doesn't work with multilevel lists. If you must work with an existing document, modify the heading style as shown above. Then, select each heading and apply the heading style that you modified by adding a numbering scheme. As I mentioned, this isn't possible if the existing document already employs the heading style. But if you face numbering headings in a document, you know you've got the request covered—and you won't lose a minute's composure. Just tell them, "Yes, I can do that."
Cons: Perhaps the only limitation I find in CorelDRAW is the need to innovate in terms of using simpler commands for users who are not as skilled. Sometimes having to look in the menu of the program with the mouse cursor, it becomes somewhat uncomfortable for those who are not so professional and are approaching the world of graphic design for the first time.
My point is, if you (like myself) often work with large and/or highly complicated graphics, you may want to hold off on changing any global “Display Performance” settings and instead adjust the quality on a per-graphic basis. If you do change the global settings to “High-Quality Display” and start to notice the program lagging a bit, you should turn down the display settings of each graphic (starting with the largest) to “Typical Display” until that lag goes away. If you want to see a preview of what your graphics will ultimately look like use the “Presentation” (Shift+W) preview. Hope these tips help!
The PSD image format deserves special mention. Being able to import PSD files into InDesign is extremely useful when working with elaborate graphics that have transparent or semi-transparent elements, especially if they are to be placed over colored backgrounds or textures. Another useful feature is the ability to turn the layers in a PSD file on and off directly in InDesign (i.e. without having to open Photoshop).
However, note that just because you choose a font doesn’t mean your audience will see it. Fonts used for list or combo boxes are embedded (so the final viewer will definitely see them in the correct font). However, fonts you choose for text fields are not embedded in the PDF, and so the end user will only see the correct font if they’re using Adobe Acrobat or Reader and have those fonts active on their computer. If the fonts aren’t present, Acrobat and Reader will substitute Adobe Serif MM or Adobe Sans Serif MM.
Enjoy a more natural drawing experience and achieve more expressive results with the native support for Microsoft Surface, and advanced stylus support. Take advantage of pressure, bearing, tilt, and rotation when using the touch-up tools, painting and other brush tools within the applications. Experiment with rotation, flatness and elongation settings to control your brushstrokes in any given illustration.
Theory is great, and articles like this one can give you quick useful tips, but the best way to learn is by practice. If you are new to InDesign, try this: use an existing layout as a guide (anything you want: a page from a magazine, a poster or a business card), and try to recreate it from scratch. Familiarize yourself with the tools, menus and options. If you get stuck, you can always search for tips and tutorials or ask a friend.
Instantly find images on your local network and search online portals and websites, and easily access content using built-in content assistant Corel® CONNECT. Organize assets by type or project in trays that are shared between Corel DESIGNER, CorelDRAW, Corel PHOTO-PAINT and Corel CONNECT for maximum efficiency. Utilize the Content Exchange and the tray synchronization option with Microsoft OneDrive.
The PSD image format deserves special mention. Being able to import PSD files into InDesign is extremely useful when working with elaborate graphics that have transparent or semi-transparent elements, especially if they are to be placed over colored backgrounds or textures. Another useful feature is the ability to turn the layers in a PSD file on and off directly in InDesign (i.e. without having to open Photoshop).

As far as figure or table numbering goes, the numbering needs to be done under the same list but on a different level. I use level 4 for my figures and level 5 for my tables. As an example, the figure style has this in the Number field: Figure^.^1-^#:^>. This renders any figure caption anywhere in the document correctly: Figure 3-7, Figure 5-2, Figure 1-11, depending only upon where in the text the style is applied. The ^. is a punctuation space. It’s slightly less than a regular space and keeps any cross-referenced figure instance from breaking over a line; so I’ll never see text like “…see Figure(line break)2-2 for a diagram of…” Also, the en space (^>) adds a nice distance between the figure number and the text explaining the figure.
Pros: It has a very old-school user interface, while also being very simple learn and grasp. It has a great variety of features -- while not as many as Adobe Illustrator or as versatile as Affinity Designer -- are still plenty in general to make good art and even work with raster images. It also has a good stylus support, making it great for complex vector illustrations. And its also very stable and reliable.
To create a running list—a list that is interrupted by other paragraphs or that spans multiple stories or documents—create a paragraph style and apply the style to paragraphs that you want to be part of the list. For example, to create a running list of the tables in your document, create a paragraph style called Tables, make a defined list part of the style, and then apply the Tables paragraph style to all paragraphs you want in your Table list.

One of the most common issues is related to the image quality. For example, if you download an image from the internet, such as a wallpaper, it will be good for viewing on your screen but not for printing. Most of the images on the internet are low-quality (for example 72 dpi or 96 dpi), because it makes uploading the images to the web faster. But this resolution is not good for printing, because the image will be "pixelated" with jagged edges and the printed result will be bad.
CorelDRAW Technical Suite 2018 Enterprise license customers gain exclusive additional collaboration and sharing benefits from the new connectivity of Corel DESIGNER and CorelDRAW to Microsoft SharePoint sites, giving you direct access to your organization’s Document Management System (DMS) right from within the visual communication authoring applications.
Word is not designed for handling large document collaboration, which includes sending clients reports. As Leo has suggested, create the PDF of your report and send that your client. If they want changes, have them communicate them back and you make the necessary changes and then PDF the revised report again. It’s the only way that you can be absolutely certain that your client sees what you intended.
Another common mistake: be careful when enlarging or reducing the size of the images. If you import an image, for example 15x10 cm at 300 dpi, but want to enlarge it to 45x30 cm, the resolution decreases proportionally (in this example, it's going to 100 dpi), so the quality will be affected. On the contrary, if you reduce the image to 3x2 cm the resolution will increase proportionally (in this example, 1500 dpi). Both are bad, so you should be careful with the resolution. Remember, 300 dpi should be the resolution at real size, not before enlarging or reducing.

You create, edit, and preview the index using the Index panel (Window > Type & Tables > Index). The panel includes two modes: Reference and Topic. In Reference mode, the preview area displays complete index entries for the current document or book. In Topic mode, the preview area displays only topics, not page numbers or cross-references. Topic mode is used primarily for creating the index structure, whereas Reference mode is where you add your index entries.
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