I am editing a lengthy document (140 pages) in Spanish. At the beginning of the document I could right click on a word and get a list of synonyms and had the option in most cases of looking at a thesaurus as well. But as I progressed in the document, the synonym / thesaurus function stopped appearing as a option. I’m using MSOffice 2013. How can I get it back?
Choose from a variety of workspaces designed for different proficiency levels and specific tasks: Page Layout and Illustration, a Classic option for longtime users, a Lite option for new users, Technical Illustration for pros doing isometric illustrations, Diagramming for pros using flowcharts and diagrams, and workspaces with the look and feel of Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator.
8 Oct 1996[13] 7 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 5, 6, 7 95, NT 4 Context-sensitive Property bar, Print Preview with Zoom and Pan options, Scrapbook (for viewing a drag-and-dropping graphic objects), Publish to HTML option, Draft and Enhanced display options, Interactive Fill and Blend tools, Transparency tools, Natural Pen tool, Find & Replace wizard, Convert Vector to Bitmap option (inside Draw), Spell checker, Thesaurus and Grammar checker. The suite included Corel Scan and Corel Barista (a Java-based document exchange format).

Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
And I'll get there by choosing the Page that I want to affect.…In this case Page 9 and I'll double-click on that, so I can actually jump to it.…I'm going to select that page and then go to the Pages panel menu and choose…Numbering & Section Options.…You're going to also find that under the Layout menu, there it is, Numbering…and Section Options.…When you choose that, it let's you change the Page Numbers for any page you have…selected in the Pages panel, Right now it's set to Automatic Page Numbering,…

In Figure 4, I placed six raster images from my sample files using the “gridify” feature, producing a 2 × 3 grid of frames. When the Make Content-Aware Fit preference was turned off, the images were placed using the Fit Content Proportionally option (in Object > Fitting). When Make Content-Aware Fit is turned on by default, the feature did a pretty good job of finding the useful content to include within the frames. Of course, you can continue to tweak the image position manually in individual frames after using the fitting command.


To line up images relative to each other across the page, select the images and click the Picture Tools tab on the Ribbon; then click Format > Align > Align Selected Objects. Finally, click Format > Align once more, and click Align Top (to align their top edges) or Align Bottom (to align their bottom edges). When you click Format > Align, you’ll see that you can also choose Distribute Vertically or Distribute Horizontally to space images evenly down the page margin or space them evenly relative to each other (depending on whether you select Align to Page or Align Selected Objects).
Another common mistake: be careful when enlarging or reducing the size of the images. If you import an image, for example 15x10 cm at 300 dpi, but want to enlarge it to 45x30 cm, the resolution decreases proportionally (in this example, it's going to 100 dpi), so the quality will be affected. On the contrary, if you reduce the image to 3x2 cm the resolution will increase proportionally (in this example, 1500 dpi). Both are bad, so you should be careful with the resolution. Remember, 300 dpi should be the resolution at real size, not before enlarging or reducing.
As a magazine design, the process is similar but with a few differences. The first step, as always, is to define the format of the magazine. Suppose the finished magazine should measure 19x27 cm then double-click on the page border (this takes us to: Tools > Options > Workspace > Document > Page Size), and choose the size of two pages together: 38x27 cm (the bleed as always, should be 3mm but can be more if preferred).
Like the Control panel, the Properties panel changes based on what’s selected. The mode you’re working in (for example, Text Insertion or Linked File) appears listed at the top of the Properties panel. The rest of the panel is grouped into sections. For example, if you are editing text, the panel configures itself to show sections for Text Style, Appearance, Character, Paragraph, Bullets and Numbering, and Quick Actions (Figure 1).

Choose the figure number paragraph style in the list on the left, and the specific figure you’re pointing at in the list on the right. Then set the Format to Paragraph Number — after all, there’s no text in the paragraph; you just want its “number.” Don’t forget to set Appearance to Invisible so that you don’t have incredibly ugly black rectangles all over your document.
InDesign can import many image formats (including JPEG, PNG, EPS, PICT, PDF, PSD and TIFF). If you are preparing a file for print, make sure the images are in an acceptable format. If you’re using a file format that allows for low-resolution settings, such as JPEG, check that the images have a resolution of 300 pixels per inch (PPI) and are saved in CMYK color mode.

      Again, as I have mentioned in numerous articles about CorelDRAW, the bottom line is: Is it worth the upgrade? Is it worth it to pay significantly more money to get the latest version? I think some of you will definitely need to think harder about that. As some of you are aware, I am not a big fan of how the recognition and identification industry has to take a back seat in terms of features that Corel makes available. Maybe this will change with the new policy but then again, maybe not. If everyone has to pay, then maybe they will finally bring some specific features to our industry that we need to make our workflow a lot easier and more efficient.


Making an index in InDesign has always been hard, but here are two little changes that help: first, the size of the New Cross-Reference field in the Index panel has been enlarged, providing more space to find and locate index entries. Second, there’s now a Find field in the same dialog box to search within the index entries. Simply type the search term in the field, and use the Find Next Entry and Find Previous Entry buttons (arrows) to view the index entries.
Microsoft’s own Publisher program is a step down from those applications in both power and price, but not every version of Office includes Publisher, and it costs $140 to purchase separately. However, chances are good that you already own a copy of Microsoft Word, and that software has a host of desktop publishing tools that you can use to produce pages that rival the output of the best layout artist.
Guess what happened? It’s likely you accidentally hit a keyboard shortcut that toggles off this preference. Check Use Typographer’s Quotes again, then lock it down by changing the keyboard shortcut. (Do you really need to toggle this off? If you need foot and inch marks, just use those keyboard shortcuts: Command+’/Command+Shift+” or Ctrl+’/Ctrl+Shift+”.)

Changing the sort order affects the sort order in the Index panel and in the index stories that are generated afterwards. You can create multiple indexes with different sort orders. For example, you can generate an index in German, change the sort order, and then generate a separate index in Swedish — just make sure Replace Existing Index isn’t selected when you generate the index.
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