Publication design shouldn’t have to be complicated and if you use Microsoft Publisher, it won’t be. The software has a great drag and drop feature that allows you to quickly insert photos and other media into your publications. The drag and drop feature will save you no end of time. You can even drop content directly from your social media pages into your document!
A quick way to create a bulleted or numbered list is to type the list, select it, and then click the Bulleted List or Numbered List button in the Control panel. These buttons let you turn the list on or off and switch between bullets and numbers. You can also make bullets and numbering part of a paragraph style and construct lists by assigning styles to paragraphs.

The same happens with the styles of text and graphics. Suppose that we are working on a magazine, and we use Garamond, 24 pts for titles and Times New Roman, 11 pts for the body of the text. But after we have finished, our customer wants to change the fonts, and asks us to use Humanist777 - 30 pts for the titles and HelveticaNeue LT Pro 55 Roman - 12 pts for the body of the text. Although you can change it manually if we edit the Style of the titles it will change on all the pages in a second.

Lastly, please do not use the keyboard shortcuts in this article to achieve foot and inch marks. The true marks are in the Symbol font – or can be found in the “glyphs” palette. The other marks are prime and double prime; seasoned designers and typographers know the difference, just as they know the differences and uses between hyphens, en-dashes and em-dashes.


Multi-level numbering is quite easy, once you’ve figured out how to do it. I am using InDesign CS4 to write a technical dissertation, and it works great with my multi-level headings, such as “3.4.1 Partial Transient…”, and figures and tables throughout each section (or chapter). I do have the whole document in one file, but it’s not too large since the images are all linked.

The true power of Microsoft Publisher is in the superb quality and selection of its templates. Unlike so many of its competitors, Publisher links to Microsoft Office's online template portfolio, which is regularly updated and sports crisp, clean designs that can easily jump-start your projects. The template selection isn't particularly huge – you can only expect access to about 700 different options, compared to the thousands that other software offers – but it's diverse, covering every type of project you might undertake. Microsoft hasn't tried to inflate its numbers by offering dozens of ugly variants of the same template, picking quality over quantity every time.
I have a document which was created in Word and has 226 pages. When I send it to a client who is using a later version of Word, it looks totally different and has over 330 pages. How can I send the client the document without it changing? Also, they wanted a pdf version, which looks nothing like the Word document. How can I get the Word document to look like the pdf?

Another master layer is created for the names of the weekdays, which are also common to all pages. The sequential position of the background and the weekdays is different, which is why two master layers are needed. The weekdays layer is sixth from the bottom in the sequence of layers. This master layer must be placed on top of all layers (Figure 9).


If you use the same page size and language for most of your documents, you can change these defaults with no document open. For example, to change the default page size, close all documents, choose File > Document Setup, and select a desired page size. To set a default dictionary, close all documents, choose Edit > Preferences > Dictionary (Windows) or InDesign > Preferences > Dictionary (Mac OS), and select an option from the Language menu.

And I'll get there by choosing the Page that I want to affect.…In this case Page 9 and I'll double-click on that, so I can actually jump to it.…I'm going to select that page and then go to the Pages panel menu and choose…Numbering & Section Options.…You're going to also find that under the Layout menu, there it is, Numbering…and Section Options.…When you choose that, it let's you change the Page Numbers for any page you have…selected in the Pages panel, Right now it's set to Automatic Page Numbering,…
When making an index for Japanese text, the yomi for index entries in the Topic Level box should be entered in the Yomi box using full-width hiragana and katakana. It is not necessary to input the yomi for full-width hiragana, katakana, alphanumeric characters, some symbols, half-width alphanumeric characters, or index entries that only have symbols in the Yomi box. Entries input in the Topic Level box are sorted. In some cases, when full-width and half-width symbols are mixed in an entry, sorting may not take place as expected. An appropriate, yomi should be entered in these cases.
When you generate the index, each topic is listed, along with the page on which it was found. The topics are sorted alphabetically, typically under section headings (A, B, C, and so on). An index entry consists of a topic (the term readers look up) paired with either a page reference (page number or range) or a cross-reference. A cross-reference, preceded by “See” or “See also,” points the reader to other entries in the index, rather than to a page number.
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