When you click More Options in the Generate Index dialog box, formatting options appear that let you determine the style and appearance of the generated index. InDesign includes a number of built‑in paragraph and character styles that you can select to format the generated index, or you can create and select your own styles. After you generate the index, you can edit these styles in the Paragraph Styles and Character Styles panels.

The old (and buggy) Layout Adjustment feature found in previous versions of InDesign has now been retired. The Liquid Layout feature is still available, but few InDesign users take advantage of it. (Liquid Layouts provide a rule-based way of resizing pages. You can read about it in “Alternate Layouts” in InDesign Magazine issue #74.) Instead, the new Adjust Layout feature is easy to use and does a surprisingly good job of making changes to page items for you.
Anyway, there's a good alternative: create a PDF. To do this, you can go to File > Publish to PDF (or go to File > Export (CTRL+I), and there choose PDF). But it is not enough just to create a PDF, since not all the PDF's have the same configuration. For example, a PDF for the web will produce a PDF of low quality but it will be a small file, suitable for attaching to an email or using on a web page. But for printing, we need the opposite: images of high quality and resolution. PDF settings is also a topic that requires a lengthy explanation, but this excedes the scope of the current tutorial. There are many different configurations, according to each company's work flow. But we propose a simple format that should work with most of the job outputs: choose PDF X-3 in the PDF Presets drop-down list, then go to "Settings" and change the "Compatibility" to Acrobat 8.0 or higher. Why? Because the PDF X-3 is a good standard but it has a default compatibility with Acrobat 4.0, which does not support transparencies and lenses. This problem is solved by changing the compatibility.

Excellent stylus support (including the ability to adjust stylus tilt, bearing and rotation in real time). A quick editing workflow. Each node has a distinct appearance depending on the handle or selection type, and the size, colours and shapes of the editing points are customisable via Options. More intuitive interactive sliders for gradients, blends, transparency and so on wrap up a decent release. desktop numbering using indesign
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