There is nothing more igniting to create a firestorm of debate than those issues that surround a TOS or EULA. If I only had a dollar for every time I listened to a podcast or read an article that related to the constant debate on this TOS and that TOS. I can tell you that people just hate it when a company or government even comes close to taking away or even treading close to their rights.
      When you install the update or service pack, you are prompted to log in or create an account. Figure 1 shows the log in screen that you are presented with when you install CorelDRAW or a new update. You do not have to create an account but if you don’t, you will not receive updates to your software. For this reason, you really do need to create an account. To create an account, click on the blue “Create an Account” button.
You can see, it's not only about the Font name and size, there are a lot of text attributes that can be used in the same style, including colors. And you can have several color styles, i.e. for footnotes, headers, etc. Editing a style will change the entire document in just one step. Remember that as with Color Styles, it is necessary to apply the style to an object/objects, so that replacing or editing a style that uses Garamond will change all text objects that have had this style applied, not each and every Garamond text object.
If you are sending the original .CDR file, you must provide all the required information. The best way to do this is to go to File > Collect for Output…, which creates a new folder with a copy of the .CDR file, the fonts used and the color profile. If you are using externally linked images, these files will be also be included. Optionally, you can also create a PDF.

You could include things like empty spaces and paragraph breaks in your search if you know, for example, that the word that has to change is followed by a space. Insert these special characters by clicking the “@” arrow to the right of the Find box, or search for a particular glyph by going to the Glyph tab. Replacing glyphs one by one might be best, so that you can monitor your work and progress.
8 Oct 1996[13] 7 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 5, 6, 7 95, NT 4 Context-sensitive Property bar, Print Preview with Zoom and Pan options, Scrapbook (for viewing a drag-and-dropping graphic objects), Publish to HTML option, Draft and Enhanced display options, Interactive Fill and Blend tools, Transparency tools, Natural Pen tool, Find & Replace wizard, Convert Vector to Bitmap option (inside Draw), Spell checker, Thesaurus and Grammar checker. The suite included Corel Scan and Corel Barista (a Java-based document exchange format).
These limitations will drive some InDesign users crazy, but there is an easy solution, at least for the first two problems: to have separate footnote numbering for a table, and place the numbering under the table rather than at the bottom of the page (interspersed with other footnotes), simply place each table in a text frame of its own. Then, if necessary, you can anchor that text frame into the larger text story. That said, if the new features still don’t meet your needs, check out Peter Kahrel’s article “Going Deep with Footnotes” in InDesign Magazine issue #95.
A Vector and a Bitmap application are its main components but you also get a Font Manager, tons of clip-arts and assorted useful components such as to import and export all formats and it runs any plug-in you would use in PhotoShop, plus customised color pallets and native support for cmyk for most any kind of publishing you may want to create in it, as well as x-1A PDF export, editable presets or custom PDF settings as well.

Changing the sort order affects the sort order in the Index panel and in the index stories that are generated afterwards. You can create multiple indexes with different sort orders. For example, you can generate an index in German, change the sort order, and then generate a separate index in Swedish — just make sure Replace Existing Index isn’t selected when you generate the index.

As it's one of the many programs that come with Microsoft Office, there is a good chance you already have Publisher on your computer. It's been included with higher-end copies of Office for almost 20 years, offered as a lightweight alternative to professional layout software such as Adobe InDesign. Though it's rarely used in a professional capacity, Publisher remains a surprisingly capable desktop publishing application. It sports excellent typography tools and one of the best template selections we've ever seen. It comes up somewhat short in the area of graphics editing support, but given its strengths, especially its usefulness in creating long-form publications, Microsoft Publisher remains a great option for at-home users, earning our Top Ten Reviews Bronze Award.
I have found that even the same letter fonts within word vary from installation to installation. If you want to establish a estandar in portable documents definetely use PDF but if you MUST MUST be able to see a word document exactly as it is seen in another computer (because you have put a lot of work already fixing it and its too long) what you can do is in the original computer where the the documents looks right, go to c:/windows/fonts then copy all fonts and paste them to a pendrive. then go to the computer where the document is not been seen right and install all fonts anew. It will say that some fonts are already installed, its ok if you do not install them and install everything else. This way you ensure that every font used in the original computer is also in the other one and no sustitue is being used. Good luck!
One thing I find a little odd is if you break apart a line into two or more segments they are still considered part of each other. In other words, once it is broken apart, if you select one of the new segments, it will select all of them. I ended up deleting the others and making new separate one. It isn't a big deal, just a little weird when you first encounter it.
Using an indexing shortcut, you can quickly index individual words, a phrase, or a list of words or phrases. Adobe InDesign recognizes two indexing shortcuts: one for standard index entries; the other for proper names. The proper name shortcut creates index entries by reversing the order of a name so it is alphabetized by the last name. In this way, you can list a name with the first name first, but have it appear in the index sorted by last name. For example, the name James Paul Carter would appear in the index as Carter, James Paul.
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